#FSN2015 Conference

February 12, 2015 by

The 3rd annual FSN Conference took place at the University of East Anglia on 27-28th June 2015. Keynoted by Lincoln Geraghty (University of Portsmouth, UK) and Suzanne Scott (The University of Texas at Austin, USA), the event featured scholars from around the world presenting on many different aspects of fan studies. You can view the conference programme here.

The event was widely talked about on Twitter using the #FSN2015 hashtag. You can view an interactive, searchable archive of all the tweets sent during the event here.

We look forward to seeing you at FSN2016!

 

The Fan Studies Network: About Us

April 27, 2013 by
Formed in March 2012, the Fan Studies Network was created with the idea of cultivating an international friendly space in which scholars of fandom could easily forge connections with other academics in the field, and discuss the latest topics within fan studies. Having attracted close to 300 members across the world, the network is already fostering a sense of community and engendering fruitful debate.
In May 2013 a special section of Participations journal was dedicated to the FSN. You can read all the articles here:
http://www.participations.org/Volume%2010/Issue%201/contents.htm
You can also find us on Twitter at @FanStudies, on the discussion list at http://jiscmail.ac.uk/fanstudies and on the Facebook group at https://www.facebook.com/#!/groups/507241072647146/
To contact the FSN, please email Lucy Bennett (bennettlucyk@gmail.com) and/or Tom Phillips (T.Phillips@uea.ac.uk)

CFP: Sex and Sexualities in Popular Culture: Feminist Perspectives

August 24, 2015 by

Sex and Sexualities in Popular Culture: Feminist Perspectives

Call for Papers for a 1-day postgraduate symposium hosted by the Digital Cultures Research Centre

Abstract deadline: September 27th, 2015

Conference date and location: November 7th, 2015, Digital Cultures Research Centre, The Watershed, Bristol

Eligibility: Postgraduate students (MA/MSc onwards) and creative practitioners

Send abstracts to:milena2.popova@live.uwe.ac.uk and bethanvjones@hotmail.com

Popular culture, as can be seen through the GamerGate controversy for one example, has a profound impact on feminist issues and discourses. Representations of sex and sexualities influence public opinion and individual attitudes and perceptions. Discussions – in both media and academia – are continuing to take place about the impact of Fifty Shades, sexism and misogyny in computer game and comic book fandom, the sexualisation of girls and the sexual desires of both young and adult women. Moral panics abound surrounding Fifty Shades and the “irrational” behaviour of One Direction fans, while LGBTQIA+ identities and sexualities are often represented tokenistically at best. Creative practitioners can easily come under fire for poor representations of sex and sexualities, as evidenced most recently by the reception of Joss Whedon’s treatment of Black Widow in The Avengers: Age of Ultron; equally they can be celebrated for their efforts, as was the case with BioWare’s inclusion of a consent negotiation scene in Dragon Age: Inquisition.

This one-day symposium will open up debates and explore the nuances of sex and sexualities within popular culture and will afford a platform for postgraduate students (MA/MSc onwards) and creative practitioners exploring these areas to meet peers, share work and learn from each other. We aim to create a space safe for experimentation – both with new ideas and with presentation formats. We therefore encourage a range of submissions, including workshops, discussions, pecha kucha, as well as the traditional 20-minute paper format.

Possible topics include but are not limited to:
– Representations of women’s desire and sexualities in popular culture
– Non-cis- and heteronormative sexualities in popular culture, especially beyond “gay and lesbian”
– Representations of sex work
– Infertility and sexual dysfunction
– Sexual intersections: race, disability, religion, class and socioeconomic status, gender
– Sex and sexualities in gaming
– Sexual pleasure in popular culture
– Invisibility: (a)sexualities unrepresented
– Sex, sexualities and social media
– Sex and sexualities in fan and transformative works

Please submit a 300-word abstract and a 100-word bio to milena2.popova@live.uwe.ac.uk and bethanvjones@hotmail.com by September 27th, 2015.

Call For Papers: Virtual/Physical Fan Spaces for Special Edition of the Journal of Fandom Studies

July 21, 2015 by

CFP: Virtual/Physical Fan Spaces for Special Edition of the Journal of Fandom Studies

As proven by the popularity of this year’s San Diego Comic Con, fan spaces are increasingly important culturally and financially. Media creators and producers have come to acknowledge the significance of their fans and the need to communicate with them, particularly through social media. Fans, however, also insist upon their own self-contained spaces where they can share their opinions and observations, as well as their transformative works, metatexual analyses, and cosplay. These spaces exist both physically (as, for example, fan run or commercial conventions, fan meet ups, and pilgrimage sites) and virtually through social media platforms such as Tumblr, twitter, and Archive of our Own.

Papers on virtual and physical fan spaces are being sought for a proposed Special Edition of the Journal of Fandom Studies. Possible topics may include, but are not limited to:

-creating or delineating fan spaces
-fan shrines or pilgrimage sites
-for-profit conventions such as San Diego Comic Con, Wizard World, or any run by Creation
-fan run conventions such as Otakon, 221bCon, or GallifreyOne
-policing and harassment in fan spaces
-virtual fan spaces including Tumblr, twitter, Archive of our Own, and fanfiction.net
-fan spaces functioning as or failing to function as “safe spaces”
-cosplay and crossplay
-authenticity of mediated and live fan spaces
-language of fan spaces
-theorizing fan spaces
-differences/similarities between virtual and physical fan spaces

Priority will be given to papers that go beyond introductory level treatment of their topics. In order to round out our existing selection of papers, priority will also be given to those focusing on the physical side of fan spaces. We are especially interested in articles dealing with conventions.

Abstract submissions should be sent to elizabeth.j.nielsen@gmail.com by 1 November 2015 and should include the author’s CV, a short biography (100-150 words), and their abstract (250-500 words).

Articles will be due 1 March 2016. For more information on the Journal of Fandom Studies, check out http://www.intellectbooks.co.uk/journals/view-Journal,id=213/view,page=0/

CFP: Moomin Collection

July 17, 2015 by

Call for papers

Moomin collection

The Moomins, created by Tove Jansson, have delighted and enlightened adults and children for generations, and have been translated into several languages. In all, nine books were published , together with five picture books and a comic strip, between 1945 and 1993. The Moomins have since been the basis for numerous television series, films and even a theme park called Moomin World in Naantali, Finland.

At the centennial anniversary of their creator’s birth, a new film has been released and more of Jansson’s works are now being translated from Swedish into various other languages, including, finally, her work for older readers. This has put the Moomins back on the map, and created a second ‘Moomin boom’, which is, in itself, worthy of analysis. Her works have often been regarded in terms of potential autobiographical readings – an approach perhaps encouraged by Jansson’s much-famed ‘island’ lifestyle – but the time is ripe for revaluations and reconsiderations. This collection therefore seeks to extend the work already done in the field, and to take into consideration as many of the different variations, and incarnations, of the Moomins as it is possible to cover in a book-length study, it aims to have an open focus, and to begin conversations about The Moomins, their roles, impact and influences as children’s characters, and their status as ambassadors of a greener, more bohemian, lifestyle.

I am seeking contributions of 5000 words and envisage that the collection will comprise entries on the books, comic strips, theatre productions, TV series (Soviet & Japanese) and film, and even the theme park. At present I do not have a publisher for this book but will be approaching Palgrave, Bloomsbury et al once I have some more contributors and potential chapter abstracts to submit. Themes might include (but are not limited to):

Ecological elements

Philosophical aspects

Gender

Narrative structure

Grief and loss

Legacy (commercialisation)

If you would like to contribute, please send an abstract of not more than 500 words by October 30th 2015 to Dr Nicola Allen at: N.allen2@wlv.ac.uk

Call for submissions: An edited collection on the work of Joni Mitchell

July 14, 2015 by

Call for submissions: An edited collection on the work of Joni Mitchell.

Editor: Dr. Ruth Charnock [University of Lincoln, UK].

Joni Mitchell is widely recognised as an innovative, influential, much-loved and much-imitated artist. From her debut album Song to a Seagull to her most recent Shine, Mitchell’s music: her tunings, her lyrics, her scope have drawn critical and popular acclaim. And yet, scholarly attention to her work has been relatively limited. This edited collection will attend to Mitchell as a figure worthy of sustained critical thought and appreciation, with a major publisher having already expressed interest.

Essay proposals that mix personal with critical, historical, musicological, or cultural-studies analyses are welcome. Topics may include but are not limited to:
• Considerations of the relationship between Mitchell’s visual art and her music.
• Politics and political activism in Mitchell’s music [for example: Mitchell as reluctant feminist, Mitchell’s ecocriticism].
• Race in Mitchell’s work.
• Low affect in Mitchell’s work [disappointment, boredom, ennui, alienation].
• High affect in Mitchell’s work [joy, desire, excitement, enchantment].
• Commodification, stardom, the market and fame.
• Cover versions and reworkings.
• Mitchell’s milieu.
• The politics of space and travel in Mitchell’s work.
• Mitchell in popular culture.
• Mitchell’s histories.
• Queer Mitchell.

Please send 350-500 word chapter proposals to Dr Ruth Charnock by 30th September, 2015.
If your essay is selected for the collection, a first draft of 5,000-6,000 words will be due on 1st February, 2016.

Please direct all enquiries to Dr Ruth Charnock: rcharnock@lincoln.ac.uk

http://courtandsparksymposium.wordpress.com/

CFP: The Fantastic in a Transmedia Era: New Theories, Texts, Contexts, 24 & 25 November 2015, University of Southern Denmark

July 3, 2015 by

The Fantastic in a Transmedia Era: New Theories, Texts, Contexts

November Tuesday 24 and Wednesday 25, 2015
International two-day conference at the University of Southern Denmark, SDU

Keynotes and speakers include Prof. Cristina Bacchilega, Prof. Martin Barker, Prof. Kathy Fowkes, Prof. Angela Ndalianis, Prof. Anne Gjelsvik, Senior Lecturer Stephanie Genz, Ass. Prof. Rikke Schubart

The fantastic is today’s most popular and significant genre in entertainment media. Among its developments are George R.R. Martin’s fantasy book series A Song of Ice and Fire and its HBO adapted series Game of Thrones; the Hunger Games film series based on Suzanne Collins’ books; The Walking Dead in comics and television; the new Disney princesses in Brave and Frozen; the rebooted superheroes emerging in games, comics, and film series; religious-themed stories in blockbuster cinema; among games are LOL and WOW. The fantastic has reached new audiences and achieved mainstream status.

Fantastic genres include fantasy, science fiction, horror, and the fairy tale, and today’s transmedia storytelling generates new versions, hybrid forms, and new audience engagements. Multiple media platforms and participatory audiences call for new theorizations of the fantastic as it expands, transforms, and migrates across media, be they grand cinemas or intimate cell phones. This raises questions about medium specificity: what does the fantastic look and feel like in different media and how do stories – affectively and aesthetically – behave when changing form? What significant developments demand our attention, from mash-up narratives to TV genre hybrids? How do audiences engage with the fantastic across media? How does the increase of female authors and female characters influence the fantastic? And, finally, the relation between imagination and the fantastic calls for re-conceptualization: Is the fantastic conservative or subversive, or can its appeal be explained by other factors?

You can go to the conference site here and read more about keynotes and speakers:

http://sdu.dk/en/Om_SDU/Institutter_centre/Ikv/Konferencer/Konferencer+2015/The+Fantastic

For questions contact: thefantastic@sdu.dk

CALL FOR PAPERS – FAN CULTURE AND THEORY POPULAR CULTURE ASSOCIATION

July 3, 2015 by

CALL FOR PAPERS – FAN CULTURE AND THEORY

POPULAR CULTURE ASSOCIATION NATIONAL CONFERENCE

SEATTLE, WASHINGTON – MARCH 21-25, 2016

Proposals for both panels and individual papers are now being accepted for all aspects of Fan Culture and Theory, including, but not limited to, the following areas:

Fan Fiction

Fan/Creator interactions

Race, Gender and Sexuality in Fandom

Music Fandom

Reality Television Fandom

Social Media and Fandom

Individual Fan Communities

Fans as critics

Fan videos and films

Fan crafts

Fan pilgrimages

Comics fandom

Ethics and responsibilities of academics working within fan studies

Global fan practices

Please submit abstracts of 100-250 words with relevant audio/visual requests online.  Click here for instructions for doing so. Deadline for proposals is October 1, 2015.

Panel proposals should include one abstract of 200 words describing the panel, accompanied by the abstracts (100 – 250 words) of the individual papers that comprise the panel.

Graduate students are encouraged to submit proposals.

All proposals & abstracts must be submitted through The PCA Database. Please submit a proposal to only one area at a time. Exceptions and rules.

If you are unsure whether your proposal fits in this area, please contact the area chair, Katherine Larsen at klarsen@gwu.edu

CFP: Shame, Gender, and Cultural Capital: The Problems of Reading and Writing Fan Fiction

July 1, 2015 by

This is a call for participants for a Fan Studies panel at PCA 2016. We’d like to put together a diverse group of speakers, ideally acafans who are also active in their fandoms and aware of the intersectional issues that occur when it comes to responses to fannish reading and writing.

There are very specific histories and stigmas associated with women’s writing and reading. Whether it’s a question of popular reading or canon formation, the responses are still the same: “that’s not good for you!”/ “that’s trashy!” / “why can’t you read Serious Literature?” The big questions we would like to especially consider are: “Why is reading and writing fic a problem for some people?” and “Where does reading fit into participatory culture?” It seems that in the scholarship fic is viewed is as something women write, and that we as scholars read critically–but we seldom to never consider how fans read fic for pleasure as leisure activity.With the increasing mainstream knowledge of and exposure to fanworks, this topic is especially pertinent, given public attacks on women’s writing (and especially young women’s writing) in television and news media.This roundtable would like to discuss how the fan models of women’s writing and its reception is complicated both through genre and fan history. And finally: Why must women always defend what we want to read and write?

We would like to add 3-4 additional participants to the three scholars already assembled (myself, Candace Benefiel from Texas A&M, and Katherine Larsen from George Washington University).

Please send a statement of interest of no more than 250 words to cait.coker@gmail.com by September 1, 2015.

CFP: Journal of Fandom Studies special issue on ethics in fan studies

June 28, 2015 by

SPECIAL ISSUE ON ETHICS IN FAN STUDIES CALL FOR PAPERS

In November 2014 an article by Adrienne Evans and Mafalda Stasi appeared in Participations calling for us as a field to consider whether a unified methodology is necessary or desirable for the field. In April 2015 the conversation at the Journal of Fandom Studies roundtable during the annual Popular Culture Association conference quickly turned to the dual (and perhaps inextricably related) topics of methodology and ethics in fan studies.

This month that conversation will continue at the Fan Studies Network 2015 conference during a workshop on ethics.  As the description of that workshop suggests, there are several questions we have all been grappling with for quite some time, questions that have become perhaps more pressing in the light of increasing use of social media by fans and increasing attention from the media on fan activities.  The four questions posed during this workshop: “what should ethics in fan studies look like, do we need a standard ethical framework; how should fan studies scholars approach ethical issues in their work; what does the future of the field hold” all raise discreet questions of their own.

This special issue of The Journal of Fandom Studies aims to examine these and related questions.  How do we define privacy? Do we need to re-examine the notion of the aca-fan? Where are our boundaries as researchers? As fans? When do we need IRB approval? To what extent might our desire to “protect” fans actually being doing a disservice to the fans and the field?

Please submit proposals for papers (250-400 words) by August 15, 2015 to journaloffandomstudies@gmail.com.

Call for Chapter Proposals: Doctor Who and History

June 25, 2015 by

Deadline: 1 September 2015 (contributors will be notified within two weeks of the deadline)

When Sydney Newman created a new family-orientated show for the BBC back in early 1963, he envisioned it as being, in John Reith’s terms, to “educate, inform and entertain”, one in which all stories “were to be based on scientific and historical facts as we knew them at that time”. It was no coincidence therefore that consequently the Doctor took on board the TARDIS a science teacher and a history teacher to learn from and share in his travels. “How wonderful,” Newman would later recall, “if today’s humans could find themselves on the shores of England seeing and getting mixed up with Caesar’s army in 54 BC, landing to take over the country; be in Rome burning as Nero fiddles; get involved in Europe’s tragic 30 years war, etc.” There would be no bug-eyed monsters, Newman warned, and the Doctor was not allowed to interfere in history, only to observe.

Over fifty years later, Doctor Who has itself become part of the cultural history of Britain, and its many stories across television, audio plays and books – whether set in the past or populated with the inevitable bug-eyed-monsters – have engaged directly and indirectly with important contemporary and historical issues, characters and events.

We invite contributions for an edited volume that focuses on Doctor Who and History: A Cultural Perspective. While there have been many publications recently celebrating the show’s longevity, or those reflecting on the programme as a product of the BBC as British institution, this volume focuses specifically on the topic of history. This publication promotes a scholarly and interdisciplinary approach to Doctor Who, exploring how the programme reflects on and contributes to notions of history. 

Doctor Who engages with history in multifarious ways and can therefore reveal much about how history is practised, produced, consumed and remediated. Chapter proposals may therefore seek to explore Doctor Who from a diverse range of academic approaches (e.g. media studies; reception theory; fan studies; education) and should draw on and identify appropriate historiographical methods and debates. It is envisaged that the collection will speak both to the programme and to history as a subject area.

Your contribution may focus on the classic series, the reboot (or both), the Big Finishaudios, original novels, or fan fiction.

That said, your contribution might focus on some aspect of

*Reflections in the programme of particular social and political eras and events

*How the show engages with historical cultural icons

*How the show expresses a continuing dialogue with literature, folklore, and mythology

*Tensions between academic and ‘public history’, between history from above and below

* How changing approaches to history and alterations in understanding of historical fact have impacted upon the show

*Non-canonical historical travels or themes

*The interaction of media and technologies in how they inform the practice of history in the programme

*Developments in the Doctor’s strict policy of non-intervention – or not

*Case studies of the ‘pure historicals’/pseudo historicals/celebrity historicals

Topics already under consideration include the depiction of Nero and the early Roman Empire in 1965’s The Romans, imagery of the Holocaust, focalisation techniques in lost story Marco Polo, and an investigation into the cultural practices and social sign-posting in The Awakening

Proposals/abstracts should be 300-350 words in length and sent as a Word file. Accepted proposals will be developed into5000-8000 word essays (including notes and references). Please send your abstract (and all correspondence) to Carey Fleiner, University of Winchester (carey.fleiner@winchester.ac.uk) James A. Jordan, University of Southampton (J.A.Jordan@soton.ac.uk) and Dene October, University of Arts London (d.october@lcc.arts.ac.uk

See https://doctorwhoandhistory.wordpress. for details

Special TWC Issue CFP: Queer Female Fandom

June 24, 2015 by

Special TWC Issue CFP: Queer Female Fandom

This special issue is the first dedicated to femslash, and it aims to collect and put in dialogue emerging research and criticism on the subject, from histories of lesbian fandom to current fan activities around queer female characters and pairings.

F/F, girlslash, altfic, saffic, and most commonly, femslash: the multiplicity of terms for female same-sex pairings attests to the heterogeneous and variable history of these fannish subcultures. While the male variety (occupying the default label, slash) has received sustained scholarly attention since the 1980s, femslash as a distinct phenomenon continues to exist on the margins of both media fandom and fan studies.

As mainstream representation and online platforms have evolved, fan practices around female-female couples are becoming increasingly vibrant and visible, and a proliferation of explicitly lesbian or bisexual characters in film and television has captivated fans and researchers alike. This work points the way to a productive investigation of the turbulent boundaries between canon and subtext, between femslash and slash communities, between erotic and political interventions, and between different methodological approaches to queer female audiences (broadly conceived) – boundaries that femslash itself troubles.

Topics may include, but are not limited to:

case studies of femslash
subcultures and fanworks
femslash dynamics and demographics
platforms, archives, and communities
diachronic or comparative analyses
feminist investments in centering women
debates about queerbaiting and the politics of visibility
queer female authorship in gift/commercial economies
transnational circulation of queer female texts
yuri (girls’ love) and other non-western femslash iterations

Submission guidelines
Transformative Works and Cultures (TWC, http://journal.transformativeworks.org/) is an international peer-reviewed online Gold Open Access publication of the nonprofit Organization for Transformative Works copyrighted under a Creative Commons License. TWC aims to provide a publishing outlet that welcomes fan-related topics and to promote dialogue between the academic community and the fan community. TWC accommodates academic articles of varying scope as well as other forms that embrace the technical possibilities of the Web and test the limits of the genre of academic writing. 



Theory: Conceptual essays. Peer review, 6,000–8,000 words.
Praxis: Case study essays. Peer review, 5,000–7,000 words.
Symposium: Short commentary. Editorial review, 1,500–2,500 words.


Please visit TWC’s Web site (http://journal.transformativeworks.org/) for complete submission guidelines, or e-mail the TWC Editor (editor AT transformativeworks.org).

Contact
Contact guest editor Julie Levin Russo (The Evergreen State College) and Eve Ng (Ohio University) with any questions or inquiries at queerfemalefandom[AT] gmail.com.

Due date
Contributions are due March 1, 2016.


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