Author Archive

Fanfiction and Student Learning, MediaCommons Front Page Collection

March 18, 2015

Fanfiction and Student Learning

MediaCommons Front Page
mediacommons.odu@gmail.com

The MediaCommons Front Page Collective welcomes responses to the survey question: How can fanfiction studies enrich student learning in the classroom and within their own reading and writing practices?

This survey question seeks to explore the pedagogical and research values within intersections of fanfiction studies. Some questions that may arise: How might fanfiction be used as a teaching tool and to what end? In what ways can fanfiction and online fanfiction communities assist second language learners? How can fanfiction studies be used to deepen students’ understandings of media and their effects on audience members? How do other forms of fanfiction (such as fanvideos and fanart) change and/or challenge our perspectives on fanfiction studies?

Responses may include, but are not limited to:
-Pedagogical value for writing students and reluctant readers
-Fanfiction and transmedia adaptation
-Pedagogical value for K-12 classrooms
-Issues of copyright, intellectual property, and plagiarism
-Fanfiction and second language learning
-Fanfiction as a site for exploring identity (gender, nationality, sexuality, ethnicity)
-Stereotypes regarding who writes fanfiction (Is it a female-dominated community? Perceptions of male writers who write from female perspectives?)

The project will run from April 6th to April 24th. Responses are 400-600 words and typically focus on introducing concepts for larger discussion, with the idea that interested individuals will read and respond daily to engage authors in digital conversation. Proposals may be brief (a few sentences) and should state your topic and approach. You may submit as an individual or offer up a special cluster of responses with others. Submit proposals to mediacommons.odu@gmail.com by April 1st to be considered for inclusion in this project.

MediaCommons is an experimental project created in 2006 by Drs. Kathleen Fitzpatrick and Avi Santo, seeking to envision how a born-digital scholarly press might re-conceptualize both the processes and end-products of scholarship. MediaCommons was initially developed in collaboration with the Institute for the Future of the Book through a grant from the MacArthur Foundation and is currently supported by New York University’s Digital Library Technology Services through funding from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation and the National Endowment for the Humanities. The site regularly receives tens of thousands of unique readers a month.

Please visit MediaCommons at: http://mediacommons.futureofthebook.org/

CFP: 2015 Midwest Popular Culture Association Conference, October 1-4, 2015, Cincinnati

March 18, 2015

FAN STUDIES

2015 Midwest Popular Culture Association Conference

October 1-4, 2015

Hilton Cincinnati Netherland Plaza

Cincinnati, OH

Deadline: April 30, 2015

Submissions.mpcaaca.org

Topics can include, but are not limited to, fan fiction, multi-media fan production, fan communities, fandom of individual media texts, sports fandom, or the future of fandom. Case studies are also welcome.

2015 Special Panels dealing with fan harassment, fan shaming, and diversity in fandom.

Please upload 250 word abstract proposals on any aspect of fandom to the Fan Studies area section of the MPCA submission site: http://submissions.mpcaaca.org

Any questions? Please email Katie Wilson at KateMarieWilson@gmail.com

More information about the conference can be found at http://www.mpcaaca.org/

Please note the availability of graduate student travel grants: http://mpcaaca.org/conference/travel-grants/

Transformative Works and Cultures – new special issue on Performance and Performativity in Fandom

March 15, 2015

The new issue of Transformative Works and Cultures, Vol 18, is now out!

Vol 18 (2015)

Performance and performativity in fandom, guest edited by Lucy Bennett (Cardiff University) and Paul J. Booth (DePaul University)

http://journal.transformativeworks.org/index.php/twc/issue/view/19

Table of Contents

Editorial
Performance and performativity in fandom
Lucy Bennett, Paul J. Booth

Theory
Self-representation in literary fandom: Women’s leisure reader selfies as postfeminist performance
Dawn S. Opel

Fannish tattooing and sacred identity
Bethan Jones

Bound princes and monogamy warnings: Harry Potter, slash, and queer performance in LiveJournal communities
Darlene Rose Hampton

Toward new horizons: Cosplay (re)imagined through the superhero genre, authenticity, and transformation
Ellen Kirkpatrick

Praxis
The digital fandom of Na’vi speakers
Christine Schreyer

Doctor Who–themed weddings and the performance of fandom
Jessica Elizabeth Johnston

Audience reaction movie trailers and the Paranormal Activity franchise
Alexander Swanson

Simblr famous and SimSecret infamous: Performance, community norms, and shaming among fans of The Sims
Ruth A. Deller

The remediation of the fan convention: Understanding the emerging genre of cosplay music videos
Nicolle Lamerichs

Symposium
Exploring nonhuman perspectives in live-action role-play
Rafael Bienia

Finding truth in playing pretend: A reflection on cosplay
Shelby Fawn Mongan

My football fandoms, performance, and place
Abby Waysdorf

Zombie walks and the public sphere
Brendan Riley

What is global theater? or, What does new media studies have to do with performance studies?
Abigail De Kosnik

Interview
Exploring fandom and the performance paradigm: An interview with Kurt Lancaster, author of Interacting with “Babylon 5″
Paul J. Booth, Lucy Bennett

Interview with Hello Earth Productions
Cameron Salisbury

Review
Fandom unbound: Otaku culture in a connected world, edited by Mizuko Ito, Daisuke Okabe, and Izumi Tsuji
Nele Noppe

Work/text: Investigating “The Man from U.N.C.L.E.,” by Cynthia W. Walker
Francesca Coppa

Registration for Spirited Discussions: Exploring 30 Years of Studio Ghibli conference (Cardiff University, 18 April 2015) now open

March 9, 2015

Registration for the Spirited Discussions: Exploring 30 Years of Studio Ghibli conference is now live

JOMEC, Cardiff University, UK, 18 April 2015
(in collaboration with the University of East Anglia)

For 30 years, Studio Ghibli has produced some of Japan’s most popular and profitable films, and yet, beyond the work of famous film director Hayao Miyazaki, many of Studio Ghibli’s achievements remain unknown outside of Japan. This one-day conference is the first of its kind, and aims to investigate the meanings of Studio Ghibli, and its significance to Japanese and global culture.

Our speakers are international, coming from Japan, Europe and the UK, and our Keynote speaker, Professor Susan Napier, is one of the world’s leading experts on anime, whose work is widely available in Japanese as well as in English. In bringing these speakers together, we aim to offer new understandings of Studio Ghibli’s complex Japanese industrial and cultural history to those outside Japan who rarely see these sides of Japan’s most famous film studio.
Surprisingly little is known about Studio Ghibli, despite the high profile international success of its director Hayao Miyazaki. Not all of the Studio’s films have been released in the UK, nor are its regular contributors – from director Isao Takahata to producer Toshio Suzuki – well-known in the West. Our main aim is to improve academic and public knowledge about Studio Ghibli, and by doing so, to improve understanding of how Japanese animation operates and how it has come to be popular at home and abroad.

The conference offers a key moment for rethinking the debates around Studio Ghibli, marking not only 30 years since the Studio began, but also the year of its impending closure. We intend to ask what this might mean for the future of animation in Japan, and reflect on the the Studio’s incredible global success.

Our contributor’s papers will explore cultural, economic, historical and industrial concepts that seek to interrogate Studio Ghibli’s meanings in relation to broader aspects of Japanese culture and society. In this way, we hope to improve understandings of both, and to begin a deeper discussion about how anime works within Japanese culture.

https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/spirited-discussion-exploring-30-years-of-studio-ghibli-tickets-16033263924

#FSN2015 Conference – Registration now open!

February 12, 2015

Registration is now open for FSN2015, the third annual Fan Studies Network Conference.

CLICK HERE TO REGISTER FOR FSN2015

CLICK HERE TO READ THE CURRENT DRAFT OF THE CONFERENCE PROGRAMME

THE FAN STUDIES NETWORK 2015 CONFERENCE
27-28th June 2015
University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK

Keynote Speakers:
Dr Lincoln Geraghty (University of Portsmouth, UK)
Dr Suzanne Scott (The University of Texas at Austin, USA)

For three years the Fan Studies Network has provided an enthusiastic and welcoming space for academics in all stages of study interested in fans and fandom to connect, share resources, and develop their research ideas. Following the success of our first two conferences, we are delighted to announce our third annual event: FSN2015, taking place over two days at the University of East Anglia, 27-28th June 2015.
FSN2015 will feature two keynote speakers, both of whom have made a dynamic impact on the field. The first will be Dr Lincoln Geraghty, author of Living with Star Trek: American Culture and the Star Trek Universe (IB Tauris, 2007), American Science Fiction Film and Television (Berg, 2009) and Cult Collectors: Nostalgia, Fandom and Collecting Popular Culture (Routledge, 2014). The second keynote will be Dr Suzanne Scott, who, in addition to her published work on fandom in journals such as New Media & Society and Transformative Works and Cultures, is currently working on her forthcoming book Revenge of the Fanboy: Convergence Culture and the Politics of Incorporation.

Talk about the event on Twitter using #FSN2015.

 

CFP: JAWS 40th Anniversary Symposium, De Montfort University, Leicester, UK, 17 June 2015

February 10, 2015

Proposals for 20 minute papers are invited for a One-Day Symposium to mark the 40th Anniversary of Steven Spielberg’s JAWS.

The Symposium takes place on Wednesday 17 June 2015 from 10.00 – 6.00 in HA 0.08 at De Montfort University, Leicester, UK.

The Symposium is part of the Faculty of Technology Research Seminar Series and is hosted at the Leicester Media School by The Cinema and Television History (CATH) Research Centre and The Centre for Adaptations, De Montfort University, Leicester, UK.

Keynote speakers include Nigel Morris, author of Steven Spielberg: Empire of Light and editor of The Blackwell Companion to Steven Spielberg.

Brief proposals, biographies and a note of institutional affiliation should be sent to Professor Ian Hunter: iqhunter@dmu.ac.uk. The deadline for proposals is 31 March 2015.

Papers could be on *any* related topic such as but not restricted to:

Jaws – influences, production, interpretation, publicity, reception, reissues, video and DVD releases and extras.
Jaws 2, Jaws 3D and Jaws the Revenge
Peter Benchley
John Williams, Verna Fields, cast and crew
USS Indianapolis
Jawsploitation rip off films from Piranha and Grizzly to Great White, This Ain’t Jaws XXX and Bait / novels / comic strips / TV shows
Novelisations and adaptations
Video games and toys, memorabilia, collectables and collecting
Jaws and Spielberg / the New Hollywood / the modern blockbuster
Jaws fandom, memes and memories
Jaws and cult
Theme part rides
Jaws and sharks in myth, the media and wildlife documentaries
Jaws, sharks and ecology and shark conservation

The attendance fee will be £20 / £10.

CFP: ‘Symfrozium’: A study day on Frozen, University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK, 12 May 2015

February 5, 2015

‘Symfrozium’: A study day on Frozen (2013)
12th May 2015
University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK

Released in 2013, Frozen has become the most successful animated film of all time. Widely touted in popular discourse as Disney’s ‘first foray into feminism’ the film’s apparent privileging of female kinship over heterosexual romance has been seen as marking the film out from its precursors in the Disney ‘princess’ franchise. Whilst academic scholarship on Frozen will no doubt be forthcoming, such claims are yet to be subject to sustained interrogation. Indeed, whilst the film’s apparently unprecedented popularity and cultural impact has garnered significant attention in popular media discourse, the film’s significance for Film, Media, Cultural studies and beyond has yet to be visibly debated. Thus, this free one day event will offer the opportunity to take up this interrogation and to reflect upon the issues and questions raised by the film in the context of its significant cultural moment since 2013.

Topics may include – but are not limited to:

Representations of gender, sexuality, race and class
Critical reception
‘Queer’ readings
The role of the soundtrack, both textually and extra-textually
Merchandising and commodification
Marketing
Industrial context
Relationship to Disney princess precursors
Social media and audience uses
Fan communities
Girl culture
Circulation within ‘parent’ culture
Issues of adaptation (given that the film was loosely based on The Snow Queen [1844])
Negative responses to the ‘cultural assault’ of Frozen
Brozen

Abstracts of no more than 250 words should be emailed to either Su Holmes(susan.holmes@uea.ac.uk) or Sarah Godfrey (s.godfrey@uea.ac.uk) by Monday 9th March. Please include your institutional affiliation and brief bio. Questions welcome.

CFP: POPCAANZ Conference, Wellington, New Zealand, 29 June – 1 July 2015

February 3, 2015

The Popular Culture Association of Australia and New Zealand

6th Annual International Conference June 29-July 1, 2015

Massey University Campus Wellington, New Zealand

CALL FOR PAPERS
Deadline for abstracts: March 1, 2015

Proposals for both panels and individual papers are now being accepted for all aspects of Fan Culture including, but not limited to, the following areas:
•Fan Fiction

•Fan/Creator interaction

•Race, Gender and Sexuality in Fandom

•Music Fandom

•Reality Television Fandom

•The Internet and Fandom

•Fan Communities

•Fan Media Production

•Fans as Critics

•Cosplay

•Fan crafts

•Fan pilgrimages

We invite academics, professionals, cultural practitioners and those with a scholarly interest in popular culture, to send a 150 word abstract and 100 word bio to Katherine Larsen at fandom@popcaanz.com.
Panel proposals should include one abstract of 200 words describing the panel,
accompanied by the abstracts (250 words) of the individual papers that comprise the panel.  Graduate students are encouraged to submit proposals.

CFP: Twenty-First Century TV: Television in the Digital Era Postgraduate Conference, University of Northampton, UK, 12 May 2015

January 29, 2015

Twenty-First Century TV: Television in the Digital Era
Postgraduate Conference
12 May 2015
The University of Northampton

This one day conference aims to bring together postgraduate students working on all aspects of television in the digital, or post-digital, age. Television today can be online, on demand, downloaded, streamed, live, timeshifted, watched on multiple screens across multiple platforms. Producing and consuming television might involve games, apps, extended narratives, social media and a range of ancillary products. Have recent changes in technology radically transformed TV, or do traditional means of making and watching TV still persist?

Proposals are invited on (but not limited to) the following topics:

· Overflow and paratexts

· Online content

· User-generated content

· Social media

· Red button

· Regional and local TV

· International TV

· Branding

· Authorship, collaboration

· Marketing

· Advertising

· Platforms and delivery

· Multi screening

· Time shifting and recording

· Archiving

· HD, 3D

· CGI, special effects

· Production, consumption

· Communities, audiences, fans

We welcome contributions from students registered on any postgraduate degree, and perspectives are invited from different disciplines.

Please send proposals (250 words) for 20 minute papers plus a brief biography (100 words) to Lorna Jowett and Michael Starr by 12 March 2015: TVCultures@northampton.ac.uk
Website: http://www.culttvonline.com/workshop-events/

The Cult TV: TV Cultures Network is funded by the Arts & Humanities Research Council (AHRC) as part of the Digital Transformations in the Arts and Humanities theme and is affiliated with the Centre for Contemporary Narrative and Cultural Theory (CCN&CT) in the School of the Arts at the University of Northampton.

CFP: Transmediality in Modern Popular Culture, Poland, 18-20 June 2015

January 29, 2015

Transmediality in Modern Popular Culture – Call for Submissions

The 9th Annual Conference of NECS – European Network of Cinema and Media Studies (www.necs.org) will take place in Łódź (Poland) on 18-20 June 2015. In reference to one of the conference’s sub-themes “The archive of popular culture” a workshop on the history of transmediality in modern popular culture will be held. It will focus on the exploration of cross-media business synergies in the entertainment industry and on the history of media convergence in the 19th and the first half of the 20th century popular culture.

The workshop will consist of two parts:

· 17 June: a preconference with a keynote lecture (Dr. Matthew Freeman, Birmingham City University) and a seminar

· 18-20 June: a set of dedicated panels during the NECS conference

SCOPE
Media convergence is one of the widely debated concepts in contemporary media research. As conceptualised by Henry Jenkins, convergence manifests itself i.e. in transmedia storytelling (Jenkins, 2006: 334). The investigation of transmediality, however, most often concentrates on contemporary networked digital media. As concerns the historical research of popular culture, transmediality is limitedly explored (however not entirely unexamined). Yet that kind of cross-textual practices can be traced as early as the modern culture industry came into existence. For example, according to Matthew Freeman, at the beginning of the 20th century in the USA we can find examples of “cross-textual self-promotion and cross-media branding (…), grounded in such cultural factors as turn-of-the-century immigration, new forms of mass media – such as, most notably, newspapers, comic strips, and magazines – and consumerism and other related textual activities” (2014: 2).

Therefore, we would like to explore the transmedial dimension of pop culture in the 19th and the first half of the 20th century. How did motives, characters, narratives circulate between various media platforms and cultural circuits? What was the transmedial dimension of the emerging global culture industry? How did mediatization processes impact on local practices (especially in the peripheral media environments)?

POSSIBLE TOPICS
Going beyond traditional notions of adaptation, remediation and intermediality, we would like to reconsider dominant history of media in modernity and to examine the constitution of the transmedia dimension of culture industry and entertainment. We are interested in transmedia flows, business synergies and connections between different media and cultural spheres:

· literature

· radio

· cinema

· music

· stage (cabaret, revue, vaudeville, variété)

· popular press

· comic strips

· graphic design and advertisement

· modern art

Submission may include, but are not limited to, the following themes:

· circulation of texts, motives, etc. in the 19th and early 20th century (i.e. vaudeville and radio relations)

· business synergies between film, radio, press, phonographic industry, etc.

· local histories of the proliferation of the technical media (especially in the peripheral and semi-peripheral countries)

· relations between “transmedia” and theories of intertextuality, adaptation, etc.

· vernacular practices of media producers and audiences

· vernacular reception and grassroot practices of fans

Theoretical and historical contributions concerning all geographical areas before 1939 are welcomed.

SUBMISSIONS & DETAILS
Please address abstracts (max. 200 words) along with institutional affiliation and a short bio (max. 150 words) to: lukasz.biskupski@swps.edu.pl

Deadline for submission: 31.01.2015. Confirmation will follow shortly thereafter.
The workshop language is English.
Workshop attendance is free, but valid NECS-membership is required to participate, see: http://necs.org/user/register.

Organizers: Łukasz Biskupski (University of Social Sciences and Humanities SWPS in Warsaw), Mirosław Filiciak (University of Social Sciences and Humanities SWPS in Warsaw) and Michał Pabiś-Orzeszyna (University of Łódź).

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT
The organization of the workshop is supported by the Polish National Center for Science under Grant DEC-2012/07/E/HS2/03878.


Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 2,580 other followers