CFP: Children, Childhood Studies, and Popular Culture, MAPACA Conference, Nov 2013

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The Children and Childhood Studies Area of the Mid-Atlantic Popular and American Culture Association invites you to participate in the annual MAPACA conference. Papers in this area examine the impact of popular culture on children and childhood, as well as the role of children and young adults as influencers and creators of popular and American culture. Work from the world of Fan Studies would be most welcome in this area!
For this area, Fans need not be children. Adult fans of work that might be considered “for children” are of great interest. We’d love to hear about Bronies, adult fans of superheros, cartoons…

Single papers, panels, roundtables, and alternative formats are welcome. Proposals should take the form of 300-word abstracts. The deadline for submission is Friday, June 14, 2013. This year’s conference will be in Atlantic City, NJ, Nov. 7-9, 2013. For the complete call as well info on how to submit a proposal, please see http://mapaca.net/. Please direct any questions about the Children and Childhood Studies area to area chair Patrick Cox at ptcox@camden.rutgers.edu

MAPACA welcomes proposals on all aspects of popular and American Culture. For a list of MAPACA’s other areas and area chair contact information, visit Subject Areas. Fan Studies work would fit in many of them, and note there is a specific area for Fan Fiction. General questions can be directed to mapaca@mapaca.net

MAPACA is an inclusive professional organization dedicated to the study of popular and American culture in all their multi-disciplinary manifestations. The association is comprised of college and university faculty, independent scholars and artists, and graduate and undergraduate students. It is a regional division of the Popular Culture and American Culture Association, which, in the words of Popular Culture Association founder Ray Browne, is a “multi-disciplinary association interested in new approaches to the expressions, mass media and all other phenomena of everyday life.”

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