Author Archive

CFP: Fan Studies Network North America Conference 2019, Chicago, 24-26 October

March 4, 2019

Call for Papers
Fan Studies Network North America Conference 2019

October 24 – 26, 2019

College of Communication, DePaul University, Chicago, IL

We are delighted to announce the second FSN North America Conference, which will take place October 24-26, 2019 at DePaul University in Chicago. Proposals are now being accepted on all aspects of fandom, including (but not limited to):

fandom and sports
fandom and music
media fandoms
theatrical fandom
anime and manga fandom
video game fandom
K-pop and K-drama fandom
celebrity fandoms
historical fandoms
literary fandoms
fandom and identity
anti-fandom and toxic fandom
fandoms and material culture
politics in/and fandom
fan studies methodologies
interdisciplinarity in/and fan studies
transnational/transcultural fan studies
fandom platforms and networks
representations of fans
We particularly encourage proposals that engage with race, sexuality, gender, ethnicity, class, age, disability, and other aspects of power and identity as they intersect with fan communities, practices, activities, and/or identities.

First-time attendees, fan-scholars and researchers at all stages of study are invited to submit proposals for:

Individual papers (500 words)
Pre-constituted panels (500 words for each paper, plus 250 word panel proposal, 3-4 participants)
Roundtables (500 words)
Workshops (500 words)
Speedgeeking (250 words; speedgeeking involves making a short ‘elevator pitch’ about an idea you’re working on to several groups of 5-7 people, who then give feedback. It’s been a popular part of FSN conferences in the UK, and we had a great time with it at our own first conference last year!)
In response to feedback following our inaugural conference, we are aiming to reduce the ‘silo effect’ in panels by both encouraging submissions of pre-constituted panels and requiring 3-5 keywords for individual paper proposals. We encourage you to think creatively about the different ways your paper(s) might intersect thematically with others.

Proposals are due no later than May 1, 2019, using the submission form HERE. For questions, please contact us at fsnna.conference@gmail.com. Information about our venue and lodging options is available on our website: http://fsn-northamerica.org

Keynote Speakers: Coming Soon!

Conference Organizers: Paul Booth, Lori Morimoto, Louisa Stein, Lesley Willard

Follow us on Twitter!

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Call for Chapters: Sartorial Fandom: Fashion, Beauty Culture, and Identity

March 1, 2019

Call for Chapter Proposals for Anthology

Title: Sartorial Fandom: Fashion, Beauty Culture, and Identity

Editors: Elizabeth Affuso (Pitzer College) and Suzanne Scott (University of Texas at Austin)

In recent years, geeks have become chic and the fashion and beauty industries have responded to this trend with a plethora of fashion-forward merchandise aimed at this audience.  This cultural ascendence can be seen in the glut of pop culture t-shirts lining the aisles of big box retailers as well as the proliferation of geek culture lifestyle brands and digital retailers over the past decade. While fashion and beauty have long been integrated into the media industry with tie-in lines, franchise products, and other forms of merchandise, there has been limited study of fans’ relationship to these industries.  Fashion and beauty cultures are significant areas for study due to their role as markers of identity and position as industries that prop up forms of hegemony along the lines of race, gender, age, ability, size, and so on. We are particularly interested in how fan fashion and beauty cultures reflect larger socio-cultural trends related to normative values, consumer culture, capitalism, and identity performance.

This collection seeks to think about fashion and beauty as related to fandom across a range of modes of practice including retailers, branded products, fan-made objects, and fandom of these.

Fan fashion and fan-oriented beauty products also offer a space to productively expand what we consider to be a “fan object,” as media texts, musicians, sports teams, celebrities, and retail lines all involve distinct forms of sartorial fan expression. These forms of expression range from purchasing and collecting to wearing and sharing (often via social media) and frequently convey messages about imagined or desirable fan identities, bodies, and demographics. This collection pointedly uses the word “fashion,” rather than the more general designation of “fan merchandise,” to acknowledge both the industrial specificities of the fashion and beauty industries, as well as the cultural significance of style. Just as Dick Hebdige and others have engaged subcultural style as a politically charged space, this collection aims to address both the affective and performative dimensions of fan fashion, as well as the identity politics that inform sartorial expressions of fan identity.

Our goal is to explore how fan fashion has evolved over time, and how it is performed in a wide array of fan communities and cultures, from early fan magazines to sports arenas to comic book conventions to theme parks to music venues. We also welcome considerations of digital incarnations of fan fashion, from hair/make-up tutorial videos on YouTube to analyses of specific social media accounts (e.g. Instagram, Tumblr) of fan fashion influencers, brands, or subcultures. Centrally, essays in this collection will explore how identity (broadly defined) intersects with fan fashion and beauty culture as a consumer lifestyle brand.

Potential topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Historical approaches to fan fashion (or histories of fan-oriented fashion and beauty products)
  • Fan cultures surrounding celebrity fashion and beauty lines  (e.g. Fenty, Yeezy, Ivy Park, Goop, etc.)
  • Fantrepreneurialism and fashion
  • Fashion and/as performance of fan identity (gender, class, age, sexuality, and so on)
  • The legalities of fan fashion (licensing, copyright, trademark, etc.)
  • Fan culture retailers and lifestyle brands (Thinkgeek, Her Universe, Jordandene, Espionage Cosmetics, etc.)
  • Fan fashion and merchandise subscription services (and unboxing or “haul” videos)
  • Cosplay (or Everyday Cosplay, Disneybounding, etc.)
  • Auctions and fashion and/as memorabilia
  • Fan-centric Jewelry and Accessories (purses, hairbows, etc.)
  • Couture fan fashion and class
  • Identity and model selection for fan fashion lines
  • Fan lingerie and intimates
  • Fan-produced fashion (Etsy, crafting cultures, etc.)
  • Fan-oriented make-up and hair tutorials
  • Fan fashion shows
  • Fandom or geek culture as fashion “trend”
  • Fandoms around specific products or brands (sneakerheads, hypebeasts, etc.)

Proposal guidelines:

  • Seeking essays of 5000-6000 words, inclusive of references
  • Proposals should contain the following:
    • Contributors’ contact information (name, title, affiliation, email, highest degree obtained)
    • Chapter title
    • Chapter abstract of 250-500 words that illustrate the chapter’s
      • a) topic/subject matter
      • b) methodological approach
      • c) conclusions/argument
  • Proposals are due March 1, 2019.
  • Proposals or questions should be emailed to Elizabeth Affuso (Elizabeth_Affuso@pitzer.edu) and Suzanne Scott (suzanne.scott@utexas.edu)

 

Fan Studies Network 2019 Conference: Portsmouth, UK, 28-29 June 2019

February 1, 2019

CALL FOR PAPERS: Fan Studies Network Conference 2019

Fan Studies Network Conference 2019

28th & 29th June 2019

School of Film, Media and Communication, University of Portsmouth, UK

Keynote Speakers:

Dr Nicolle Lamerichs, HU University of Applied Sciences, Utrecht, The Netherlands

Dr Lori Morimoto, Independent Researcher, USA

In 2019 the Fan Studies Network will be travelling to the UK’s south coast and the historic naval city of Portsmouth. We are delighted to announce that the seventh annual Conference is taking place in the School of Film, Media and Communication at the University of Portsmouth. Offering a diverse two-day programme our conference will sit alongside historic sites such as the Dockyards, HMS Victory and the Mary Rose while also attracting presenters to explore our cult fan trail which includes comic book, collectibles and record stores, video and board game lounges, and museum exhibits. Fans of Arthur Conan Doyle’s Sherlock Holmes can see a permanent collection of artefacts and fans of Charles Dickens can visit his birthplace. The conference will continue FSN’s long-standing tradition of offering an enthusiastic space for interdisciplinary researchers at all career stages to connect, share resources, and further develop their research ideas. In addition to panel presentations, the two days will feature a variety of social events, workshop discussions, and our famous speed-geeking sessions.

We are honoured to have Nicolle Lamerichs and Lori Morimoto as our keynote speakers for 2019. Both have contributed hugely to the field of fan studies, leading the community in new and important directions. Nicolle is senior lecturer and team lead at Creative Business at HU University of Applied Sciences, Utrecht. She is the author of Productive Fandom: Intermediality and Affective Reception in Fan Cultures (Amsterdam UP, 2018) and co-editor of Fan Studies: Researching Popular Audiences (interdisciplinary.net, 2014). Lori is an independent researcher who has published widely on transcultural and transnational media fandoms in a range of seminal collections and leading journals, including: Fandom: Communities and Identities in a Mediated World, Second EditionThe Routledge Companion to Media Fandom, and A Companion to Media Fandom and Fan Studies; Participations, Transformative Works and CulturesEast Asian Journal of Popular Culture and Mechademia: Second Arc. We are very excited to have both of them come to Portsmouth as keynotes for FSN2019.

We invite abstracts of no more than 300 words for papers that address any aspect of fandom or fan studies. We also welcome collated submissions for pre-constituted panels of four papers. We encourage new members, in all stages of study, to the network and welcome proposals for presentations on, but not limited to, the following possible topics:

  • The business of fandom (entrepreneurs, affective economics)
  • Branding fandom (promotional culture, marketing and PR)
  • Fandom, copyright and the law
  • Links between fandom, participatory culture and the political moment
  • Forms of anti-fandom, non-fandom or toxic fandom
  • The intersections between celebrity and fandom
  • Fan activism in response to contemporary political/world events
  • Fan space, place and geographies
  • Fandom and material cultures
  • Fan Studies methodologies
  • Fandom and controversies
  • Producer/fan interactions and relationships
  • Fan conventions
  • Fan labour
  • Sports fandom

In connection with our location and keynotes, the following topics may be of interest:

  • Music fandom
  • Literary fandom (Sherlock Holmes/Dickens)
  • Subcultural identities
  • Cult movies and filming locations
  • Transcultural and transnational fandom
  • Fandom, race and ethnicity
  • Cosplay and productive fandom
  • The use of social media and its language (e.g. memes, hashtags, GIFs)

We also invite short abstracts (100-200 words) from anyone wishing to present as part of our popular ‘speed geeking’ session. This would involve each speaker presenting a short discussion on a relevant topic of their choosing to a number of small groups, and then receiving instantaneous feedback, making it ideal for presenting in-progress or undeveloped ideas. If you have any questions about this format of presentation, please don’t hesitate to contact us.

Please send any abstracts/enquires to: fsnconference@gmail.com by the end of Sunday 24th March, 2019. Please include up to three keywords for your submission, which will help us to place your paper in an appropriate panel, and a short biographical note.
You can join the discussion about the event on Twitter using #FSN2019, follow us @FanStudies or visit http://www.fanstudies.org.

Dr Lincoln Geraghty
Reader in Popular Media Cultures
School of Film, Media and Communication
University of Portsmouth
Eldon Building North
Winston Churchill Avenue
Portsmouth
PO1 2DJ
Lincoln.Geraghty@port.ac.uk

 

 

FSN North America 2018 Conference Programme

October 19, 2018

Dear all,

The final programme for the inaugural FSN North America conference is here!
The conference takes place on Thursday Oct 25-Saturday Oct 27 2018 at DePaul University, College of Communication, Chicago, IL USA. You can find more information on the conference here: https://fsn-northamerica.org

The keynote is Abigail De Kosnik, from UC Berkeley, and the conference features speed geeking, a vid show, two full days of panels, and a roundtable about future directions of fan studies.

The organisers (Paul Booth, Kristina Busse, Lori Morimoto, Louisa Stein, and Lesley Willard) have put together an outstanding programme and you can download it here:

FSN NA 2018 Programme

For those who can’t make it, the hashtag to follow is #FSNNA18. This will be an unmissable event!

Fan Studies Network Inaugural North America Conference, DePaul University, Chicago, 25-27 October 2018

September 14, 2018
Dear all,
We wanted to offer a reminder that the inaugural FSN North America conference takes place this year! Registration closes on 15 September 2018. You can register here: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/fan-studies-network-north-america-tickets-46167991706 and find more information on the conference here: https://fsn-northamerica.org
The conference takes place on Thursday Oct 25-Saturday Oct 27 2018 at DePaul University, College of Communication, Chicago, IL USA
The keynote is Abigail De Kosnik, from UC Berkeley, and the conference will feature speed geeking, a vid show, two full days of panels, and a concluding roundtable about future directions of fan studies. This promises to be an exciting event not to miss!
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Call for applications: Australian PhD scholarship opportunity in fan studies

May 25, 2018
PhD Scholarship

One PhD Scholarship is available through the Faculty of Education and Arts at the University of Newcastle, Australia, for a research program in celebrity and fan cultures under the supervision of Dr Joyleen Christensen.

Expressions of interest are being sought from highly motivated and enthusiastic applicants interested in pursuing an intensive PhD program in the field of celebrity and fan cultures. Projects focusing on fan cultures based on individual celebrities and/or specific films or television series are particularly welcome. The scholarship is provided by the University of Newcastle under the Early Career Researcher (ECR) Higher Degree Research (HDR) Candidate Scholarships scheme. As part of the conditions of this scholarship, the candidate will be required to complete six-monthly progress reports. The selected HDR candidate must be a domestic candidate and must commence their program no later than the 31 March 2019. Information on the scholarships and application process can be found through the University of Newcastle’s Graduate Research office.

PhD Scholarship details

Supervisor: Dr Joyleen Christensen

Available to: Domestic

Eligibility Criteria

This scholarship is suited to a student with an Honours degree in Film, Media, and Cultural Studies (or similar).
The successful applicant must meet the University of Newcastle’s admission eligibility criteria.

Application Procedure

Interested applicants should send an email expressing their interest, including scanned copies of their academic transcripts, CV, a brief statement of their research interests and a proposal that specifically links them to the research project, to Joyleen.Christensen@newcastle.edu.au by 29 June 2018 at 5pm.

Applications Close 29 June 2018


Contact Dr Joyleen Christensen
Phone +61 2 4348 4190
Email Joyleen.Christensen@newcastle.edu.au

CFP: Eating Fandom: Intersections between Fans and Food Culture

May 24, 2018

Call for Chapter Proposals for Anthology

Title: Eating Fandom: Intersections between Fans and Food Culture

Editors: CarrieLynn D. Reinhard (Dominican University), Bertha Chin (Swinburne University of Technology, Sarawak, Malaysia) and Julia E. Largent (McPherson College)

Rationale: An emerging field of fan studies looks at how fans interact with different aspects and elements of food cultures. This collection seeks to address the myriad ways that fandom and food culture intersect.

A food culture refers to the individuals, networks, and institutions involved in the production, distribution, and consumption of food, as well as the norms, beliefs, artifacts and activities that constitute and circulate through that culture. Food cultures vary across nations, societies, cultures, and historical periods, with trends and techniques adapting and shaping attitudes, practices, and consumption habits. Thus, a food culture can be dependent upon, and influential to, a specific community. As a fandom can represent such specific communities, fan studies scholars are now turning more attention to how fan communities view and use food as part of the practices and values that constitute that collective; or how fan practices are being replicated in the relationship between foodies and producers.

Additionally, with the perception of fan identities as involving certain affective, cognitive, and behavioral components, the conceptualization of what is a fan can be extended to understand individuals within a food culture and see them identifying as a “fan” of a specific food, culinary school, technique, and so forth. Both professionals and foodies could thus be classified as fans, and the networks and institutions that constitute the food culture could be studied for how they create and maintain such food-based fandoms.

This anthology seeks to gather research studies that examine the different ways fandoms and food cultures intersect. The goal would be for a collection of empirically-based essays that utilize a range of theoretical and methodological perspectives from different disciplines. The collection would hopefully serve to inspire other scholars on the range of intersections available to study as well as how to study such intersections. It would also hopefully serve to expand on the ways in which fan studies’ theoretical frameworks could be applied to other fields of research.

We are looking for essays that consider the relationships and roles of food in fandoms as well as the view of food cultures as fandoms. Potential topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Foodies as fans
  • Food production as fan activity
  • Food consumption as fan activity
  • Fandom-related foods
  • Chefs, culinary professionals as fans
  • Convergence culture and food culture
  • Fans of food shows
  • Fans of food celebrities
  • Fans and cooking, food literacy
  • Food community as fan community
  • Fans and food activism
  • Importance of food in fan collectives
  • Negotiating food fan identities

Chapter proposal guidelines

  • Seeking empirically-based essays of 6000-7000 words, inclusive of references (APA citation style)
  • Proposals should contain the following:
    • Contributors’ contact information (name, title, affiliation, email, highest degree obtained)
    • Chapter title
    • Chapter abstract of 250-500 words that illustrate the chapter’s
      • a) topic/subject matter
      • b) methodological approach
      • c) conclusions/argument
  • Proposals are due June 30, 2018
  • Proposals, and questions, should be emailed to CarrieLynn at creinhard@dom.edu

CfP Special issue of Transformative Works and Cultures: Fan Studies Methodologies

April 30, 2018

Fan studies is an interdisciplinary field, with scholars in disciplines ranging from cultural studies to law, from sociology to library science, all bringing their unique perspectives to bear on research about fans. As a result, fan studies is methodologically eclectic: approaches can include a combination of quantitative, qualitative, highly theoretical, practice-based, online, offline, archival, legal, textual, and/or community-centred methods, and this is far from an exhaustive list. This gives the field flexibility to address a huge variety of research questions while also posing challenges with regards to methodology selection and compatibility, different perspectives on rigour, as well as ethics and researcher positionality. The ways we do fan studies are as different, interesting, and challenging of academic norms as the things and people that we study.

The goal for this special issue of Transformative Works and Cultures, therefore, is to set a common but varied ground for doing research as a fan studies scholar. While it is clear that fan studies does use specific methodologies, those methods aren’t always explicitly stated or considered (Evans and Stasi, 2014). We recognize the variety of disciplines that make up fan studies scholarship, and seek to express a common sense of ethics, practices, stances, without privileging one as ‘the’ methodology. Despite being interdisciplinary and methodologically eclectic, the tradition of scholarship in the model of Textual Poachers has shaped what we see as “fan studies” (Ford, 2014), though other approaches have also emerged, such as Chin and Hitchcock-Morimoto (2013) who argue for an affective definition of transcultural fans, and Reid (2009) who highlights the queer practices of non-normative fans and fandoms.

We seek submissions that address or challenge that shaping, and explore and theorize key methodological challenges and approaches within fan studies. We encourage articles that address not just the how-to of a method, but also why — theoretically, ethically, fannishly — that method is a good choice (or, perhaps, why it is not a good choice in some cases), and we particularly encourage articles that consider the ethical dimension as an essential and integral part of research methodology. We welcome submissions from scholars with experience within academia as well as those working outside academic institutions, and those who conduct research on fans while primarily identifying as fans rather than scholars. Potential topics include but are not limited to:

  • The dual positionality of those who study fans, as both fans and researchers (aka the “aca-fandom” question)
  • The theory and practice of interdisciplinarity in fan studies
  • Conducting research outside the support structures of academic institutions
  • Negotiating disciplinary and institutional requirements with personal, fannish ethics
  • Researching fans online and offline
  • Practice-based research methodologies
  • Feminist and other caring approaches to the relationship between researcher and researched in fan studies
  • Quantitative and mixed methods approaches to fan studies
  • The place of qualitative scholarship in fan studies
  • Fan perspectives on fan studies methodologies
  • Community building among fans and scholars
  • Citational practices in fandom and fan studies
  • Embedding intersectional practices in research methods
  • The challenges/solutions to studying underrepresented fandoms, fans, and fannish phenomena
  • The role of (mitigating) shame in fan studies methods
  • “Bringing in” and “working out towards” adjacent fields, for instance Porn studies, Queer Studies, Critical Race Studies, etc.

We also welcome shorter pieces showcasing specific practical challenges, methods, and tools for the contemporary fan studies scholar.

Works cited

* Chin, Bertha, and Lori Morimoto. “Towards a theory of transcultural fandom.”Participations 10, no. 1 (2013): 92–108.

* Evans, Adrienne, and Mafalda Stasi. “Desperately seeking methods: New directions in fan studies research.” Participations 11, no. 2 (2014): 4–23.

* Ford, Sam. “Fan studies: Grappling with an ‘Undisciplined’discipline.” Journal of Fandom Studies 2, no. 1 (2014): 53–71.

* Reid, Robin Anne. “Thrusts in the dark: slashers’ queer practices.” Extrapolation 50, no. 3 (2009): 463–483.

Submission guidelines

Transformative Works and Cultures (TWC, http://journal.transformativeworks.org/) is an international peer-reviewed online Gold Open Access publication of the nonprofit Organization for Transformative Works copyrighted under a Creative Commons License. TWC aims to provide a publishing outlet that welcomes fan-related topics and to promote dialogue between the academic community and the fan community. TWC accommodates academic articles of varying scope as well as other forms that embrace the technical possibilities of the Web and test the limits of the genre of academic writing.

Theory: Conceptual essays. Peer review, 6,000–8,000 words.

Praxis: Case study essays. Peer review, 5,000–7,000 words.

Symposium: Short commentary. Editorial review, 1,500–2,500 words.

 

Please visit TWC’s Web site (http://journal.transformativeworks.org/) for complete submission guidelines, or e-mail the TWC Editor (editor AT transformativeworks.org).

Contact—Contact guest editors Julia Largent (@julialargent), Milena Popova (@elmyra), and Elise Vist (@visticuffs) with any questions or inquiries at FSMethodologies@gmail.com. You are welcome to approach us on Twitter with informal inquiries.

Due date—January 1, 2019, for estimated March 15, 2020 publication.

Call for Papers: An Anthology on Carrie Fisher

April 26, 2018

Call for book chapters for a proposed edited collection

Following her death in 2016, the public mourning of Carrie Fisher revealed the breadth of her impact as star, feminist icon, and mental health advocate. We are seeking abstracts for essays to be included in an anthology on Fisher that will appeal not only to academics, but also to her fans.

In addition to analyzing Fisher’s work as a performer, writer, comedian, and advocate, this anthology aims to provide insight into the role of celebrity in social issues of gender inequality, mental health, substance addiction, and political resistance. We welcome work from a wide variety of academic approaches and fields of study, including audience & fan studies, feminist theory, queer theory, autobiography studies, celebrity studies, comedy studies, media studies, and scholarship in public health/mental health.

Possible topics may include but are not limited to:

* Adaptation

* Ageism

* Authorship

* Autobiography

* Bright Lights Starring Carrie Fisher and Debbie Reynolds

* Comedic Style

* Drug Addiction

* Fan bases

* Fan Collections

* Feminist activism

* Gender Inequality

* Mental Health

* Public Mourning

* Fisher’s work as script doctor

* Social Media Use

* “Space Mom”

* Wishful Drinking stage play

A university press is interested in this collection and looks forward to a proposal from the editors after contributors and topics are finalized. Please direct any questions and 300-500 word abstracts along with a 150-word bio to Linda Mizejewski (mizejewski.1@osu.edu) and Tanya D. Zuk (tzuk1@gsu.edu) by May 25, 2018. We will respond by June 6, 2018.

Final essays will be approximately 5,000 to 7,000 words and will be due January 2, 2019.

Editors:

Linda Mizejewski, a professor at Ohio State University, is the author of five books on women and popular culture and is the co-editor of Hysterical! Women in American Comedy (2017), winner of the Susan Koppelman Award from the Popular Culture Association.

Tanya D. Zuk, a Ph.D. candidate at Georgia State University, is an editor at In Media Res a web publication out of GSU. She has also published work in the Journal of Transformative Works & Cultures, and Journal of Religion and Popular Culture. Her research focuses on fandom, LGBTQ+ new media, and collaborative authorship.

CFP for Mechademia 12.1, Transnational Fandoms

April 26, 2018

The CFP for Mechademia 12.1, Transnational Fandoms, is now available. The issue will explore the global consumption, creative (re)production, and widespread redistribution of East Asian popular culture.

The CFP will close on June 1, 2018. Questions and submissions may be directed to the Submissions Editor at submissions [at] mechademia.net.

In tandem with the 2018 Mechademia conference in Minneapolis, this volume of the Second Arcjournal will focus on the theme of Transnational Fandoms. It will explore the global consumption, creative (re)production, and widespread redistribution of East Asian popular culture, including, but not limited to, fan cultures surrounding manga, anime, popular cinema, music, fashion, and gaming. Authors are invited to submit papers of 5000-7000 words by June 1, 2018.

Media fandoms arose in Japan and the United States contemporaneously, growing out of the proliferation of mass media in the twentieth century, particularly after the spread of the television in the 1950s and 1960s. As the work of scholars such as Marc Steinberg has made clear, the origins of what is known in Japan as the “media mix” and in the United States as “convergence” or “transmedia” (after the work of communications scholar Henry Jenkins) lay in the rise of Astro Boy and its associated merchandising in the 1960s. From the cross-cultural science fiction fandom scene of Worldcon, brought home to Japan in the 1970s, to the European obsession with Takemiya Keiko, Hagio Moto and the Izumi Salon in the same decade, fandom in the broadest sense has always been transnational. In the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s, and with increasing simultaneity of access enabled by the rise of fandom cultures online since, transnational fandoms focused on East Asian media have proliferated globally. At the same time, the media mix model has increasingly conquered Hollywood, as is evident in the global success of the “Marvel Cinematic Universe” at the box office.

Transnational fan cultures have played an active role in these developments, and professional creators continue to evolve in their attempts to court and to corral fandom approval and fan production. Friction between these groups, and the slippages among them evident in the doujin goods networks of Japan, the webstores of fan artists worldwide, and the growing approbation for established creators working on tie-in media, are some of the most interesting sites of study for transnational fandoms in the twenty-first century.

We welcome papers treating, among other themes:

  • The transnational networks and community formations of fan cultures
  • Transnational fandoms of specific media in anime, manga, gaming, film, toys, and literature
  • Identity formation in relation to media pertaining to gender, sexuality, class, race, ability, and age, among other social factors in transnational fandoms
  • Fans in the media (Depictions of otaku, BL fans/fujoshi, female gamers, etc. in film, television, manga, journalism, and digital media)
  • Legal issues pertaining to fan cultures and/or remix
  • Fan service by content creators in response to fandoms
  • Amateur and semi-professional fan media (Doujin goods, “Amerimanga,” fan fiction, AMVs, fanart)
  • Performative communities (Cosplay, Nico nico Douga dance parties, anime theme song group dances, practices of fan pilgrimage)
  • Historical examples of transnational fandoms predating television

Please send papers to submissions [at] mechademia.net by June 1, 2018. The Mechademia Style Guide and Essay Parameters is available on the Mechademia website.

All interested scholars are also invited to present about their work on Transnational Fandoms at the associated Mechademia Conference in September 2018. The deadline for submitting conference papers is April 15, 2018. For more information, please consult the conference CFP.