The Fan Studies Network: About Us

April 27, 2013 by
Formed in March 2012, the Fan Studies Network was created with the idea of cultivating an international friendly space in which scholars of fandom could easily forge connections with other academics in the field, and discuss the latest topics within fan studies. Having attracted close to 300 members across the world, the network is already fostering a sense of community and engendering fruitful debate.
In May 2013 a special section of Participations journal was dedicated to the FSN. You can read all the articles here:
http://www.participations.org/Volume%2010/Issue%201/contents.htm
You can also find us on Twitter at @FanStudies, on the discussion list at http://jiscmail.ac.uk/fanstudies and on the Facebook group at https://www.facebook.com/#!/groups/507241072647146/
To contact the FSN, please email Lucy Bennett (bennettlucyk@gmail.com) and/or Tom Phillips (T.Phillips@uea.ac.uk)
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CALL FOR PAPERS: Fan Studies Network 2018 Conference

December 8, 2017 by

FSN CFP imageCALL FOR PAPERS: The Fan Studies Network 2018 Conference

Fan Studies Network 2018 Conference
29th & 30th June 2018
School of Journalism, Media & Cultural Studies (JOMEC), Cardiff University, Wales, UK

Keynote Speakers:

Dr Mark Duffett, Reader, University of Chester, UK
Professor C. Lee Harrington, Miami University, USA 

As our global network continues to grow, with inaugural conferences held for FSN Australasia in 2017 and FSN North America hosting an event in October 2018, we are delighted to announce that the sixth annual Fan Studies Network Conference is taking place at the School of Journalism, Media and Cultural Studies (JOMEC) at Cardiff University in the UK. Offering a diverse two-day programme during June 2018, the conference will find its home in a city already well-known as a destination for fans of television shows such as Doctor Who, Torchwood, and Sherlock. The conference will continue FSN’s long-standing tradition of offering an enthusiastic space for interdisciplinary researchers at all career stages to connect, share resources, and further develop their research ideas. In addition to panel presentations, the two days will feature a variety of social events, workshop discussions, and our famous speed-geeking sessions.

We are delighted to welcome Dr Mark Duffett and Professor C. Lee Harrington as our keynote speakers. Mark is the author of Understanding Fandom (Bloomsbury, 2013) and Elvis Presley (Equinox Press, 2017) and editor of Popular Music Fandom (Routledge, 2014) and Fan Identities and Practices in Context (Routledge, 2016). C. Lee Harrington, with Denise D. Bielby, is the author of Soap Fans: Pursuing Pleasure and Making Meaning in Everyday Life (Temple University Press, 1995) and Global TV: Exporting Television and Culture in the World Market (New York University Press, 2008). She is also the co‐editor of several anthologies on popular culture, fan studies, soap opera, and aging and media. We are very excited to have both speakers as keynotes for FSN2018.

We invite abstracts of no more than 300 words for papers that address any aspect of fandom or fan studies. We also welcome collated submissions for pre-constituted panels of four papers. We encourage new members, in all stages of study, to the network and welcome proposals for presentations on, but not limited to, the following possible topics:

  •      – Links between fandom, participatory culture and the political moment
  •        – Forms of anti-fandom or non-fandom
  •        – The intersections between celebrity and fandom
  •        – Fan activism in response to contemporary political/world events
  •      – The use of social media and its language (e.g. memes, hashtags, GIFs)
  •        – Fannish places and spaces, both physical and virtual
  •        – Fandom and material cultures
  •        – Music fandom
  •        – The ethics of studying participatory culture and fandom
  •        – Fan Studies methodologies
  •        – Sports fandom
  •        – Transcultural and transnational fandom
  •        – Fandom and race and ethnicity
  •        – Producer/fan interactions and relationships
  •        – Fandom and controversies

We also invite short abstracts (100-200 words) from anyone wishing to present as part of our popular ‘speed geeking’ session. This would involve each speaker presenting a short discussion on a relevant topic of their choosing to a number of small groups, and then receiving instantaneous feedback, making it ideal for presenting in-progress or undeveloped ideas. If you have any questions about this format of presentation, please don’t hesitate to contact us.

Please send any abstracts/enquires to: fsnconference@gmail.com by the end of Monday 12th February 2018. Please include up to three keywords for your submission, which will help us to place your paper in an appropriate panel, and a short biographical note.

You can join the discussion about the event on Twitter using #FSN2018, follow us @FanStudies or visit http://www.fanstudies.org.

Conference Organisers: Lucy Bennett and Tom Phillips (FSN chairs)
Bertha Chin, Bethan Jones, Richard McCulloch, Rebecca Williams (FSN board)

CFP: Queerbaiting collection

November 29, 2017 by

CFP Short Pieces on Queerbaiting

Fans use the term ‘queerbaiting’ to account for a (primarily) television tactic whereby producers deliberately insert homoerotic subtext between characters in order to capture a queer viewership, yet never actualise this subtext on screen. This is a call for short, forum-style thought  pieces on queerbaiting for an edited book collection being prepared for submission to University of Iowa Press’ Fan Studies series.

Pieces of 500–1500 words (inclusive of references) are invited on all aspects of the topic. These pieces will appear alongside chapter-length investigations of the topic and are envisioned as shorter observations, views on developments, and debates or issues related to the topic of queerbaiting. These pieces are designed to offer readers a glimpse into a range of specific cases, or in-depth readings of single queerbait scenes. Some suggested topics include, but are not limited to:

– a short theoretical piece on the term itself or a single related term;
– a reading of a single fan text that responds to instances of
queerbaiting in some way;
– an investigation of a single campaign to boycott a series that
queerbaits, such as on Twitter (i.e., the response to #AskSupernatural);
– a personal narrative on the effects of queerbaiting;
– a textual reading of a specific scene or pivotal episode from a series
accused of queerbaiting, such as from Supernatural, Sherlock, Merlin,
Rizzoli & Isles, Teen Wolf;
– a consideration of a single character or key pairing in the context of
the queerbaiting debate;
– a reading of an individual film that queerbaits (i.e., Victor
Frankenstein);
– a reading of a lesser known series or form of queerbaiting (i.e., a
video game, a music video);
– an exploration of queerbaiting as evidenced in the marketing of a
particular program;
– a specific case of cast and producer response to accusations of
queerbaiting;
– a discussion of a text that exists beyond the confines of/predates the
term (i.e., Xena);
– a single counter-argument to the queerbaiting concept.

The collection is being compiled by Dr Joseph Brennan
(joseph.brennan@sydney.edu.au) and contributions should be submitted in  full together with a 150-word bio to the editor for consideration by December 17, 2017. Authors will be informed of the outcome of their submission by the end of 2017, with successful entries being included in the manuscript submitted to the publisher for external review.

Informal correspondence with the editor on proposed pieces prior to the
submission deadline is encouraged.

Fan Studies Network Australasia conference launches this week

November 29, 2017 by

We are delighted that taking place this week, between 30th November – 1st December 2017, at the University of Wollongong, New South Wales, Australia, is the first ever Fan Studies Network Australasia conference.

The conference is organised by Dr. Bertha Chin (Swinburne University, Malaysia), Dr. Renee Middlemost (University of Wollongong, Australia), Prof. Sue Turnbull (University of Wollongong, Australia) and Dr. Ika Willis (University of Wollongong, Australia).

The keynote is Professor Matt Hills, from the University of Huddersfield and Dr. Ika Willis, from the University of Wollongong.

You can follow the exciting event and Australasian branch on Twitter here: @FSNAusAsia

The final programme is now available here: FSNFinalProgramWEB

CFP: A Celebration of Slashers

November 28, 2017 by

A  Celebration  of  Slashers #DePaulSlashers (DePaul  University,  April  28,  2018)  
Now accepting  submissions  and  ideas  for  the  sixth  annual  Pop  Culture  Colloquium  at  DePaul  University in  Chicago!  

DePaul  University’s  College  of  Communication  is  hosting  a  one-day  celebratory  colloquium in  honor  of  the  Slasher  genre  on  Saturday,  April  28, from  9am-6pm.  More  details  can  be  found  at popcultureconference.com.  

This  event  will  feature  roundtable  discussions  from  scholars  and  fans  of  slasher  films  (topics  do  not  have to  focus  on  Halloween),  including  the  Friday  the  13th, Nightmare  on  Elm  Street,  and  other  franchises, films,  television  series,  video  games,  graphic  novels,  or  et  al.  

Our  keynote  speaker  is  Rachel  Talalay, director  of  Nightmare  on  Elm  Street 5  as  well  as  multiple  television  series  (Doctor  Who,  Sherlock, Riverdale,  Flash,  Supernatural,  Reign…the  list goes  on.)  

Participants  may  propose  panels  and  topics  about  a  broad  array  of  ideas  related  to  the  genre  and  its cultural  impact.  The  Pop  Culture  Conference  does  not  feature  formal  paper  presentations,  but  speakers  are invited  to  have  roundtable  discussions  themed  around  these  topics.  The  audience  for  this  event  is  both graduate  and  undergraduate  students,  both  fans  and  scholars.   If  you’re  interested  in  speaking  on  a  roundtable, or  want to  propose  a  panel with  3-5  people,  or  have  ideas for  other  events/lectures, please  send  a  300  word  abstract  that  proposes  a  significant  topic  of discussion  and  a  CV/resume  to  Pop  Culture  Conference  (popcultureconference@gmail.com)  by  Jan 15,  2018. Please  aim  your  abstracts  for  a  more  general audience  and  for  a  discussion  rather  than traditional scholarly  paper  presentation.  We  will  also  have  the  opportunity  to  publish  a  longer  version  of your  talk  in  an  update  to  our  Time  Lords  and  Tribbles  book. 

Potential  topics  include  (but  are  not  limited  to): 

Slashers  and  gender 

Slashers  and  race 

Narrative  and  genre  theories  of  slashers 

Changes  in  the  horror  genre 

Slasher/horror  fandom 

The  impact of  particular  directors, writers, or  actors  on  the  genre 

Teaching  horror/slashers 

Adaptation  within  the  slasher  canon 

Case  studies  of  slasher  films 

What  counts  as  a  slasher? 

For  more  information,  please  check  out  popcultureconference.com,  and  sign  up  for  updates  on  Facebook (search  “A  Celebration  of  Slashers”).  

We  hope  that  you  will  be  able  to  join  in  the  discussion  and celebration! 

CFP: Global TV Horror 

October 31, 2017 by

Global TV Horror – edited collection call for abstracts ed. Stacey Abbott and Lorna Jowett
When Stacey Abbott and Lorna Jowett hatched the idea for a book on TV Horror in the early 2000s, they had only a sense that by the time the book was published in 2012 there would be many more horror TV series to watch, write about, and discuss. In this follow up to TV Horror, the first full-length examination of horror on television, they take aim at global TV horror.

Television audiences and horror fans across the world may be most familiar with the latest big brands in TV horror such as The Walking Dead (US, 2010-), yet horror has always had a truly international reach. From anthology series to children’s drama, Belphegor [Phantom of the Louvre] (France, 1965), Historias para no dormir [Stories to Keep You Awake] (Spain, 1966–82), Children of the Stones (UK, 1977), Riget [The Kingdom] (Denmark, 1994-1997) and Goosebumps (Canada, 1995-98) terrified viewers, imprinted themselves on memories, and influenced the contemporary boom in horror on TV. With the expansion of TV channels, view on demand and streaming services, more and more content is needed, and niche productions with distinctive characteristics are more welcome than ever. The last five years have given us the moody and atmospheric Les Revenants [The Returned] (France, 2012-), adaptations of novel series like Bitten (Canada, 2014-16), contemporary reimaginings of queer horror classics in web series Carmilla (Canada, 2014), cross-genre Scandi series Fortitude (UK, 2015-) and Jordskott (Sweden, 2015-), films remade as TV, such as Wolf Creek (Australia, 2016-), original Amazon series like Tokyo Vampire Hotel (Japan, 2017-), one-off miniseries such as Au-delà des Murs [Beyond The Walls] (France/ Belgium, 2016), and American Netflix animated series Castlevania (US, 2017-) based on a series of Japanese video games. Horror on television shows no signs of abating, and more and more global productions are reaching audiences as national boundaries are eroded by digital technologies.

We seek proposals that address the full range and scope of ‘horror’ and ‘television’ in a global context, historical and contemporary. Chapters may engage with, though are not restricted to, the areas below.

• Global production and co-production, commissioning

• Distribution and global circulation via import/ export or illegal downloading

• Platforms and delivery: VoD, streaming, inter/national branding

• Translation, subbing, and dubbing

• Adaptations and remakes

• Forms and formats: serial drama, webisodes, webseries, miniseries, TV movies, long and short forms, non-fiction horror TV

• Aesthetics: visual and aural style, FX and make up; music and soundscapes

• Crossing over: international stars and creators

• Consumption and reception: global audiences and fandoms

• Cultural and national horrors: reimagining horror tropes in inter/national markets

• Inter/national representations and identities

• Horror v. terror

• Genre splicing and global TV trends

• Children’s international horror television

• Global transmedia horror: paratexts, overflow, narrative extensions

Proposals of 300 words, along with a short biography, should be submitted to both editors (s.abbott@roehampton.ac.uk and lorna.jowett@northampton.ac.uk) by 28 February 2018.

CFP: The Future of Fandom 

August 3, 2017 by

Transformative Works and Cultures CFP: The Future of Fandom (1/15/18; 9/15/18)


This special 10th anniversary issue of Transformative Works and Cultures seeks to explore the future of fandom while looking back to its past. How might scholarship on fandom’s past and present invite speculation about its future? And what might the
possible futures invoked by technological, ecological, and political discourses mean for fandom’s communities and practices? Science fiction in particular–the field whose strategies spawned fandom, and the genre in which much fan activity occurs–has used
imagined futures to shed new light on the present and the past. In turn, studying where we are and where we have been allows us to imagine where we may be heading.

We invite essays that seek to historicize and contextualize fans, fan works, and fandoms across past, present, and future. Scholarship on fandom’s futures can open connections between technology and interfaces, fannish discussions and trends, fictions of imagined
futures, and cultural and political changes in order to illustrate how fandoms may be understood in their historical contexts and cultural interactions.

This issue will feature a special section, “Predictions,” that will allow fans and academics to imagine fannish futures. We particularly invite personal and creative responses, including essays from the future, documenting trends that haven’t yet come to be.

Possible topics include but are not limited to:
 * How have interfaces affected fannish communities and production, and how may these change in the future?
 * How do demographic shifts in fandom and new voices change fan works and communities? How have new generations of fans changed fandom?
 * How have the intersection and interactions between industry and audiences changed, and how may they change in the future?
 * How do fannish futures look from different global locations, and what will transnational landscapes of fandom look like in the future?
 * How is the fannish future gendered and racialized? How have fans created or imagined different futures for queerness, transness, disability?
 * How have fandoms engaged with Afrofuturism, Chicanafuturism, Indigenous futurism, and other literary, cultural, and social movements challenging the whiteness of the imagined future?
 * How has the commercialization of fan works changed over time, and how will it play out in the future legally, economically, or socially? Is there still a clear distinction between fan and pro writers?
 * How have social and cultural changes affect the intersections between politics and fandom? How do these changes connect to fannish social activism?
 * What changes in the source material and media, in fannish social organization, platforms, and technology, in fannish access, culture, and demographics do we see emerging as we look ahead?
 * How does the increasing mainstreaming of fannish behavior affect fannish identities and behaviors? How does it alter mainstream audiences’ engagement with fannish subcultures and media industries.
 * What will fandom be 10 years from now, or 20? Are there some things that never change, that make us what we are––and if so, what?

Submission guidelines: Transformative Works and Cultures (TWC,
http://journal.transformativeworks.org/
) is an international peer-reviewed online Gold Open Access publication of the nonprofit Organization for Transformative Works copyrighted under a Creative Commons License. TWC aims to provide a publishing outlet that
welcomes fan-related topics and to promote dialogue between the academic community and the fan community. TWC accommodates academic articles of varying scope as well as other forms that embrace the technical possibilities of the Web and test the limits of
the genre of academic writing.

    Theory: Conceptual essays. Peer review, 6,000–8,000 words.
    Praxis: Case study essays. Peer review, 5,000–7,000 words.
    Symposium: Short commentary. Editorial review, 1,500–2,500 words.

Contact: Please visit TWC’s Web site (http://journal.transformativeworks.org/) for complete submission guidelines, or e-mail the TWC Editor (editor@transformativeworks.org).

Due date: January 15, 2018, for estimated September 15, 2018 publication.

CFP: Investigating Identities in Young Adult (YA) Narratives: Symposium

August 1, 2017 by

Investigating Identities in Young Adult (YA) Narratives

Symposium on the 13/12/2017 at The University of Northampton UK

From JK Rowling’s Harry Potter series to Stephenie Meyer’s Twilight, Young Adult (YA) narratives have grown exponentially over the past twenty years. Adopting a range of genres and platforms including the Bildungsroman and the coming of age teen drama, YA narratives represent a significant cultural means to explore the formation of identity in all its varied aspects. This one day symposium at the University of Northampton will investigate the representation of identity constructions in relation to narrative form in YA narratives both past and present.

Suggested topics may include, but are no means limited to:

–          Representations of racial/ethnic identity in YA narratives

–          Representations of gender and/or sexual identity in YA narratives

–          The representation of identity in YA narratives in relation to the notion of class

–          Interrogations of YA narrative’s treatment of LGBTQIA+ identities

–          The effect of trauma on identity in YA narratives

–          YA narratives and the notion of the outsider or other

–          The relationship between genre and the notion of identity in YA narratives

–          The representation of non-binary identities in YA narratives

–          The transition from childhood to adulthood in classic (children’s) literature

–          The representation of disability in relation to the notion of identity in YA narratives

–          The use and function of supernatural identities in YA narratives

Being an interdisciplinary symposium focused on narrative, papers from across the subject areas of literature, screen studies, history, popular culture and education studies are invited. The symposium welcomes papers on both YA literature and screen adaptations, and from scholars working on earlier periods as well as contemporary culture.

The symposium invites papers from academics, early career researchers and postgraduate research students alike.

Abstracts of no more than 250 words should be sent to both sonya.andermahr@northampton.ac.ukand anthony.stepniak2@northampton.ac.uk by the 8th October 2017.

CFP: FANS OF COLOR, FANDOMS OF COLOR 

July 26, 2017 by

Special Issue TWC CFP: FANS OF COLOR, FANDOMS OF COLOR (3/1/18; 3/15/19)

In a 2015 essay in Transformative Works and Cultures, Rebecca Wanzo calls for “a new genealogy of fan studies” to begin to remedy the systemic oversight of race in fan studies. Drawing mostly from scholars who may not claim or be claimed by fan studies, Wanzo
offers a genealogy of black popular culture theorists who have engaged in “black fan criticism and acafandom.” 

We welcome authors who wish to build on this genealogy of black fandom scholarship or to create parallel and intersectional genealogies of fan scholarship. Recent discussion of race and fandom has addressed issues of media representations of characters of
color (Warner 2015), fannish responses by and to fans of color and the conversations surrounding race in fan works (Pande 2017), and racebending and “racial revision” in fan productions (Thomas and Stornaiuolo 2016, carrington 2016). This issue seeks to
expand on these lines of investigation, and to promote new ones.
The editors invite the submission of short and long scholarly essays by and about people of color who self-identify as fans (“fans of color”), and about fan communities that have formed around media characters and texts that predominantly or prominently
feature characters of color (“fandoms of color”). The editors are particularly eager to review contributions that involve methodological innovation, and/or draw on sources from historical periods other than the contemporary.

As both the scholars and objects fan studies have, to date, been predominantly white, we seek work from fan scholars of every ethnicity about their own experiences, and the experiences of people of color, in and with fandom. Here are additional topics that
authors might wish to explore for this special issue:

  • The fannish and transformative practices of audience members of color.
  • How a community of color is fannish about performers of color or about media texts that primarily feature people of color.
  • How a predominantly white community is fannish about performers of color or about media texts that primarily feature people of color.
  • Fans, “stans,” and stanning.
  • Close readings of the performances or public personae of stars or characters of color, or of specific media texts about communities of color.
  • First-person essays: what it feels like to be a fan of color, or what it feels like to be in a fandom that is mostly comprised of fans of color, or what it feels like to be a fan of an ethnic performer/text who is not the same ethnicity of that performer/text.
  • Revisiting key concepts of fan studies or race/ethnicity studies in the context of fans of color/fandoms of color.
  • Being a fan (or non-fan or anti-fan) of racially problematic/racist texts.
* Actors of color who play white characters or other cases of actors portraying an ethnicity other than their own.
  • “White savior” texts or whitewashing in film/television casting.
  • Race/ethnicity in fan casting (“racebending”).
  • Diversity (or lack thereof) in awards shows.
  • Black Girl Nerds or “blerds” in general.
  • Fans of color in/and Diaspora, or other transnational audience communities.
  • Fansubs, or other transformative/interpretive practices, and language, nationality, race/ethnicity.
  • Mixed-race and racially ambiguous characters/actors.
  • Ships of color, slash, and other fan fiction/art featuring characters of color.
  • Interracial ships, brotps, BFFs.
  • Intersections between race/ethnicity and gender, sexuality, class, nationality, and/or religion in fan communities, fan practices, or the experiences of individual fans.
  • Transformative works, reception, and fandom in the scholarly fields of East Asian, South Asian, Pacific Islander, and Asian American Studies; Indigenous/First Nations Studies; Africana/Black Studies; Latinx Studies; Middle Eastern, Islamic Studies, and
    other fields.

Works cited
carrington, andré. 2016. Speculative Blackness: The Future of Race in Science Fiction. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press.
Pande, Rukmini. 2017. “Squee From the Margins: Investigating the Operations of Racial/Cultural/Ethnic Identity in Media Fandom.” Ph.D. Dissertation, The University of Western Australia.
Thomas, Ebony Elizabeth and Amy Stornaiuolo. 2016. “Restorying the Self: Bending Toward Textual Justice.” Harvard Educational Review, Vol. 86, No. 3, pp. 313-338.
Wanzo, Rebecca. 2015. “African American Acafandom and Other Strangers: New Genealogies of Fan Studies.” Transformative Works and Cultures, Vol. 20.

http://journal.transformativeworks.org/index.php/twc/article/view/699/538
.
Warner, Kristen. 2015. The Cultural Politics of Colorblind TV Casting. New York: Routledge.

SUBMISSION GUIDELINES

Transformative Works and Cultures (TWC,
http://journal.transformativeworks.org/
) is an international peer-reviewed online Gold Open Access publication of the nonprofit Organization for Transformative Works copyrighted under a Creative Commons License. TWC aims to provide a publishing outlet that
welcomes fan-related topics and to promote dialogue between the academic community and the fan community. TWC accommodates academic articles of varying scope as well as other forms that embrace the technical possibilities of the Web and test the limits of
the genre of academic writing.

Theory: Conceptual essays. Peer review, 6,000–8,000 words.

Praxis: Case study essays. Peer review, 5,000–7,000 words.

Symposium: Short commentary. Editorial review, 1,500–2,500 words.

Please visit TWC’s Web site (http://journal.transformativeworks.org/) for complete submission guidelines, or e-mail the TWC Editor (editor@transformativeworks.org).

CONTACT—Contact guest editors Abigail De Kosnik (adekosnik@berkeley.edu) and andré carrington (profcarrington@drexel.edu). 

DUE DATE—March 1, 2018, for estimated March 2019 publication.

CFP: Wentworth is the New Prisoner – 5 & 6 April 2018, RMIT University, Melbourne, Australia

July 21, 2017 by
Wentworth is the New Prisoner
A two-day international conference
Thursday 5th and Friday 6th April 2018RMIT University, Melbourne, Australia

Confirmed keynote speakers and panellists:

Professor Sue Turnbull (University of Wollongong, Australia);
Kim Akass (University of Hertfordshire, UK);
Kate Hood (actress, writer and director, aka Prisoner’s Kath Maxwell);
Jan Russ (casting director, PrisonerNeighbours, etc.)

Wentworth (aka Wentworth Prison) is an award-winning Australian prison drama series now in its fifth season and recently renewed for a sixth season. It screens in Australia on Foxtel, in the UK on Channel 5 and in the USA on Netflix. The series was inspired by Prisoner (aka Cell Block H), a groundbreaking drama produced between 1979 and 1986, which was internationally successful and led to a cult following. Set in a women’s prison in contemporary Melbourne, Wentworth dramatises current cultural and political issues, and provides a rich example of creative and industrial screen practice that can often be read in the context of its predecessor, Prisoner.

This conference will unite those who study and are fans of Wentworth and Prisoner, with those who are or who have been involved in making the series.

We invite abstracts for papers (critical or creative, 20 minutes) from academics, practitioners or those who are both, including research degree candidates and early career researchers. All topics related to Wentworth and Prisoner will be considered, with the aim of generating a lively exchange of critical and creative ideas. Our intention is that selected papers from the conference will lead to a publication (most likely an edited collection).

Conference organising committee:

Associate Professor Craig Batty (RMIT University); Dr Tessa Dwyer (Monash University); Dr Radha O’Meara (University of Melbourne); Dr Stayci Taylor (RMIT University).

Please email your 300-word paper abstract, along with a 100-word biography, to governorwentworth@gmail.com by Monday 30 October 2017.

Potential paper and panel topics include, but are not limited to:

●      Gender in Wentworth/Prisoner

●      Sexuality and Queerness in Wentworth/Prisoner

●      Class in Wentworth/Prisoner

●      Prison industrial complex in Wentworth/Prisoner

●      Race and ethnicity in Wentworth/Prisoner

●      Diversity behind bars

●      Nation in Wentworth/Prisoner

●      Violence in Wentworth/Prisoner

●      Substance abuse in Wentworth/Prisoner

●      Mental health and mental illness in Wentworth/Prisoner

●      Aesthetics of Wentworth/Prisoner

●      Serial narrative and Wentworth/Prisoner

●      Performance in Wentworth/Prisoner

●      Wentworth as reboot or remake of Prisoner

●      Television genre and the prison drama

●      Prestige TV and prison dramas 

●      Reception of Wentworth/Prisoner

●      Wentworth/Prisoner fans, fan practices and fandoms

●      Distribution of Wentworth/Prisoner

●      Creative practice in the development and production of Wentworth/Prisoner

●      Industrial practice in the development and production of Wentworth/Prisoner

●      Wentworth/Prisoner and transnational TV and format trade

●      Activism, Social Change and Wentworth/Prisoner

●      Music and lyrics in Wentworth/Prisoner

Transmedia Literacy International Conference, 22-24 March 2018, Universitat Pompeu Fabra – Barcelona, Spain

July 21, 2017 by

Join us on March 22-24, 2018, for the Transmedia Literacy International Conference. This event brings together a vibrant and global community of media and education researchers and innovators. The conference is organized as a part of the dissemination activities of the TRANSLITERACY H2020 action, a project that involves researchers from Europe, Latin America and Australia. Beyond the paper sessions and the keynotes the Transmedia Literacy International Conference will include workshops and short presentations by education innovation leaders. The main objective of the conference is to share research outputs and practices around the following topics:

Transmedia literacy
Transmedia education
Transmedia skills and informal learning strategies
Media literacy
Educommunication
Student-generated contents
Collaborative cultures and education
Fan cultures and education

Transmedia Literacy International Conference will be held at the Universitat Pompeu Fabra – Barcelona, and will feature a series of workshops for teachers as well as two days of paper sessions and a special event around Transmedia Literacy. We hope you can join us!

This event has received funding from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement No 645238

Deadlines:
Proposals submission: October 31, 2017
Notifications: December 15, 2017

Registration:
With accepted proposals: from December 15 to February 15, 2017
Other participants: from February 16, 2017
Keynote speakers:
David Buckingham – University of Loughborough (United Kingdom)
Divina Frau-Meigs – Université Sorbonne Nouvelle (France)
Alejandro Piscitelli – Universidad de Buenos Aires (Argentina)
Other keynote speakers will be confirmed as soon as possible.
PROPOSALS

The Transmedia Literacy Conference will accept the following formats:

Research Papers: participants must send research papers (extension: 6,000 -8,000 words) before October 31, 2017. The Transmedia Literacy International Conference will accept proposals tailored to the diverse forms of research in the field of transmedia literacy, transmedia education, transmedia skills and informal learning strategies, media literacy, educommunication, student-generated contents, collaborative cultures and education, and fan cultures and education.
Paper parallel sessions will be held on March 22 (afternoon) and March 23 (morning & afternoon).
If you are interested in presenting a Research Paper, please fill and submit a proposal in English (download the Paper Guidelines) to the following email: transliteracyconference@upf.edu, clearly indicating that is a Research Paper proposal in the subject. Please send a MS Word file (.doc, or .docx); do not send PDF documents.
Deadline: October 31, 2017.
Innovative Educational Practices: participants must send before October 31, 2017 an extended abstract (extension: 1,200-1,500 words) describing a real educational experience in primary/secondary schools involving transmedia storytelling, collaborative practices in social media, student-generated contents o any other educommunicational activity.
Innovative educational practices sessions will be held on March 22 (afternoon) and March 23 (morning & afternoon).
If you are interested in presenting an Innovative Educational Practice, please fill and submit a proposal in English (download the specific guidelines here) to the following email: transliteracyconference@upf.edu, clearly indicating that is an Innovative Educational Practice proposal in the subject. Please send a MS Word file (.doc, or .docx); do not send PDF documents.
Deadline: October 31, 2017.
Workshops: the Transmedia Literacy International Conference will accept a short number of workshops oriented to high-school teachers/professors. The workshops should be designed for short groups (no more than 20 people) and the duration should be 4 hours (240 minutes including a break); they could explore different uses and experiences around transmedia storytelling and collaborative cultures in the classroom.
Workshops will be held on March 23 (morning & afternoon) and, eventually, on March 24 (morning).
Workshops can be in English, Spanish or Catalan (Los talleres pueden ser en inglés, castellano o catalán / Els tallers poden ser en anglès, castellà o català).
English: If you are interested in organizing a Workshop, please fill the following Workshop proposal (extension: 1,500-2,000 words) (download the specific guidelines here) and submit it to: transliteracyconference@upf.edu, clearly indicating that is a Workshop proposal in the subject. Please send a MS Word file (.doc, or .docx); do not send PDF documents.
Castellano: Si estás interesado en organizar un Taller, por favor completa la siguiente propuesta (descargar la guía) (extensión: 1.500-2.000 palabras) y envíala a: transliteracyconference@upf.edu, indicando claramente que es una propuesta de Taller. Por favor, envía un archivo MS Word (.doc o .docx); no envíes documentos PDF.
Catalán: Si estàs interessat a organitzar un Taller, per favor completa la següent proposta (descarregar la guia) (extensió: 1.500-2.000 paraules) i envia-la a: transliteracyconference@upf.edu, indicant clarament que és una proposta de Taller. Per favor, envia un arxiu MS Word (.doc o .docx); no enviïs documents PDF.
Deadline: October 31, 2017.
PROGRAM OF THE CONFERENCE (work in progress)

Thursday, March 22, 2018

09.00 – 13.00 Registration
10.00 – 13.00 Special opening event (live and streaming)
13.00 – 14.30 Lunch
14.30 – 15.30 Keynote conference
15.30 – 16.00 Coffee Break
16.00 – 18.00 Paper / Innovative Educational Practices Sessions
Friday, March 23, 2017

09.00 – 13.00 Registration
09.30 – 10.30 Keynote conference
10.30 – 11.00 Coffee Break
11.00 – 13.00 Paper / Innovative Educational Practices Sessions
13.00 – 14.30 Lunch
14.30 – 15.30 Keynote conference
15.30 – 16.00 Coffee Break
16.00 – 18.00 Paper / Innovative Educational Practices Sessions / Workshops
Saturday, March 24, 2017

10.00 – 14.00 Workshops
10.30 – 11.00 Coffee Break
11.00 – 12.30 Teacher’s Kit presentation

Important details

This conference is supported by the TRANSLITERACY Project / H2020 Research and Innovation Programme under Grant Agreement No. 645238. The registration is free and includes coffee breaks.
Participants with accepted papers, innovative experiences or workshops will have priority for registration. The registration will then be opened to other participants.
All conference rooms will be equipped with standard Wi-Fi broadband service, PC, Power Point / Adobe PDF software, AV projection, sound, and VGA adapters. We will not provide additional bandwidth capacity or provide other special equipment.

COMMITTEES

Scientific Committee

Carlos A. Scolari – Universitat Pompeu Fabra (Spain)
Elisenda Ardévol –Universitat Oberta de Catalunya (Spain)
Rosalía Winocur – Universidad de la República (Uruguay)
Gladys Ceretta – Universidad de la República (Uruguay)
Sara Pereira – Universidade do Minho (Portugal)
Raine Koskimaa – University of Jyväskylä (Finland)
Rebecca Enyon – Oxford Internet Institute (United Kingdom)
Simona Tirocchi – Università degli Studi di Torino (Italy)
Carlos Barreneche – Pontificia Universidad Javeriana (Colombia)
Gabriella Taddeo – Istituto Nazionale Documentazione Innovazione Ricerca Educativa (Italy)
Heather Horst – University of Sidney (Australia)
Sarah Pink – RMIT University (Australia)
Organization Committee

Carlos A. Scolari – Universitat Pompeu Fabra
Maria-Jose Masanet – Universitat Pompeu Fabra
Mar Guerrero-Pico – Universitat Pompeu Fabra
María-José Establés – Universitat Pompeu Fabra
Elisenda Ardèvol – Universitat Oberta de Catalunya
Israel Márquez – Universitat Oberta de Catalunya
Débora Lanzeni – Universitat Oberta de Catalunya
Arnau Gifreu – Universitat de Vic
Ruth Contreras – Universitat de Vic

The conference