The Fan Studies Network: About Us

April 27, 2013 by
Formed in March 2012, the Fan Studies Network was created with the idea of cultivating an international friendly space in which scholars of fandom could easily forge connections with other academics in the field, and discuss the latest topics within fan studies. Having attracted close to 300 members across the world, the network is already fostering a sense of community and engendering fruitful debate.
In May 2013 a special section of Participations journal was dedicated to the FSN. You can read all the articles here:
http://www.participations.org/Volume%2010/Issue%201/contents.htm
You can also find us on Twitter at @FanStudies, on the discussion list at http://jiscmail.ac.uk/fanstudies and on the Facebook group at https://www.facebook.com/#!/groups/507241072647146/
To contact the FSN, please email Lucy Bennett (bennettlucyk@gmail.com) and/or Tom Phillips (T.Phillips@uea.ac.uk)

UPDATED CFP: Sex, Subversion and Bodily Boundaries: The Darker Side of Slash Fan Fiction

February 15, 2017 by

 

UPDATED CFP: Sex, Subversion and Bodily Boundaries: The Darker Side of Slash Fan Fiction

 

Proposals are invited for essays exploring the depiction of (and engagement with) “non-normative” eroticism within online slash and femslash fan fiction.

 

Following the publication of Hellekson and Busse’s groundbreaking edited collection Fan Fiction and Fan Communities in the Age of the Internet (2006), academic interest in slash fiction has continued to document the evolution and development of the genre as a whole. It is generally proposed that slash fiction enjoys a simultaneous intertextual function – partly a subversive cultural dialogue and partly an unapologetically playful approach to literary convention – but a function which is ultimately more complex and nuanced than a traditional incorporation/resistance paradigm would suggest. 


This collection aims to engage directly and explicitly with some of slash fiction’s less gentle aspects in order to explore the following question: in a text which not only deliberately creates but
 maintains unstable, unequal and ungentle paradigms, can the same critical frameworks that depict slash fiction as a valorised form of egalitarian romance still be applied? If a text refuses to moving towards the gradual equality and intimacy inherent within Romantic convention, can the ending only be an unhappy one?
This collection of essays aims to supplement existing fan academia with a small insight into what is an underrepresented but no less prolific or popular facet of slash fiction. With this is mind, proposals are invited for essays of c.8500 words exploring the following in erotic slash fiction:

·         The exploration, portrayal and reception of BDSM encounters and relationships.

·         The portrayal of cisgender characters which challenge heteronormative patterns of behaviour, either by non-compliance or by excessive performativity. Particular interest in the dynamics generated by two ‘butch’ or ‘girly’ characters in sexual scenes and how violence is used to regulate and code ‘unacceptable’ behaviours and desires.

·         Xenofetishism and the treatment of alternative bodily configurations such as external breeding, hermaphroditic characters in slash fiction.

·         Fame and infamy within fan writing; the perks and perils of having a reputation for pushing the boundaries.

·         The treatment of trans* characters, non-binary gender, genderqueer and genderfluid characters in overtly sexual situations – both in canon and in fan texts.

·         The portrayal of abusive behaviours, rape scenes and toxic relationships and the appeal of the themes.

·         The treatment of and audience response to taboo relationships – incest, guardian/ward, underage characters and exploited characters.

·         Discussions and debates within fan communities regarding explicitly non-normative sexuality within slash fiction as a whole, particularly in regard to participation in kinkmemes, Shipping Olympics, Kink Bingo, fic requests -+etc.

·         Non-monogamy and non-monogamous characters and relationships, non-normative femininity/masculinity and any explorations thereof.

These lists are far from complete and should be taken only as a starting point, rather than definitive. 

 

Generally speaking, texts under discussion should have been produced, published and released within the last twenty years, although if a text beyond this timeframe is particularly significant this can be discussed – please do get in touch with your ideas. Source media includes but is not limited to: role-playing video games, webcomics, TV episodes and series, comics and graphic novels, novels and short stories, and films. Proposals are also welcome for essays exploring the unique deictic nature of slash fan fiction as an ongoing dialogue between canon, text and audience. Particular interest will be given to papers exploring how digital accessibility has contributed to its popularity as a genre, and the cultural impacts generated by the popularity of made-to-order fan fiction commissions, such as kinkmemes, Shipping Olympics, Kink Bingo, fic requests etc.

 

Final inclusion in the published volume will be subject to peer review.

 

Please send proposals of approximately 500 words plus a short biography to ashtonspacey@gmail.com by Wednesday 22nd February 2017.

 

CFP: Queer/ing Animation

February 15, 2017 by

The University of Hull is pleased to announce the Queer/ing Animation Symposium!

When: 26 July, 2017

Keynote Speaker: Nichola Dobson from the University of Edinburgh will be presenting the keynote speech, discussing her biographical work on animation master Norman McLaren and the impact his sexuality had on his life and work.

Official Call for Papers:

In his article “No Place Like Home: The Transgendered Narrative of Leslie Feinberg’s Stone Butch Blues,” Jay Prosser states that “queerness effects an opening of the borders between genders, disturbs the discrete categories of lesbian, gay, man, woman – undoing their identity narratives – and, as a result, enables the formation of new political, cultural, and social coalitions” (486).  In Prosser’s view, “queer” is a call for plasticity, for flexibility, within society’s heteronormative understand of gender and sexuality.  Those who identify as “queer” frequently use their identities to criticize and disrupt these notions, demanding acknowledgement when society ignores them, representation when they and other LGBT+ individuals are erased.
Animation operates in a similar way: its plasticity allows the medium to move freely between the realism of Walt Disney to the absurdity of Jan Švenkmajer, constantly searching for new possibilities of expression.  Paul Wells explains, ‘the animated film has the capacity to redefine orthodoxies of live-action narrative and images, and address the human condition with as much authority and insight as any live-action film’ (1993: 4).  In other words, animation’s elasticity opens a realm where ideas of normalcy are disrupted and hidden potentials are revealed much in the same way that queer theory disrupts common understandings of gender and sexuality to explore other options in regards to embodiment and expression.
How, then, can concepts of queerness be applied to animation?  If queer and LGBT+ individuals are frequently erased, where can they be found in animated films and animation history?  This conference seeks to answer these questions and more.  Applicants are invited to submit papers on the following topics:

  • Queer animators (i.e. erasure of queer identity, impact sexuality or identity has on their work)
  • Studios’ relationship with queer communities (ex. treatment of queer employees, interaction with queer fans, marketing practices aimed specifically at the queer community)
  • Queer representation within animation (ex. positive representation, gaps in representation, possible examples of queerbaiting)
  • Animation as a tool for queer activism
  • Applications of queer theory to animation as a medium
  • Queer fan communities and their relationship to a particular animated text (ex. queer interpretations of a character, slash and femslash communities)

Please send a 250-word abstract and a 100 word bio to Kodi Maier atqueeringanimation@outlook.com

The deadline for abstracts is 14 April 2017.

Call for Essays: Stranger Things: Eighties Nostalgia, Cynicism and Innocence

February 14, 2017 by

 

Call for Essays: Stranger Things: Eighties Nostalgia, Cynicism and Innocence

I am looking for proposals for chapters for a book on the Netflix series Stranger Things to be published by McFarland & Company. As the book title suggests, the overarching theme of the volume is how the series creates, evokes, uses and exploits the eighties, eighties culture and contemporary nostalgia for both. Successful proposals will link an aspect of Stranger Things with an eighties counterpart and explore how the series engages that aspect of Reagan-era culture.

What makes this project unique is that we will wait until season two premieres to finalize the essays, so that information on and analysis of the second season will be included in the book’s essays.  The individual essays will be 5000-7000 words each, with each essay focused on a specific aspect of the series and its intersection with the eighties.

 

The Deadlines:

  • I will accept abstracts on a rolling basis up until April 30, 2017. Those whose abstracts are accepted will be sent the style guide and information regarding the preparation of manuscripts.
  • I plan to submit the manuscript 6-8 weeks after the premiere of season two of Stranger Things. The second season will premiere on Halloween, 2017.
  • Contributors must submit the first draft of their essays to me by the premiere of season two and then final draft by November 30. While this is a tight turnaround time, if the contributors have drafts in earlier that outline their theses and season one analyses, and then have four weeks to view and add in season two analyses, then we should be able to get the final manuscript to McFarland by late December.
  • Please note, no extensions can be given once the show premieres, so please only submit abstracts if you are certain you can adhere to this timetable. The deadline for manuscript submission is set, so the expectation is that final essays will be in by the above dates.

 

I already have essays on:

Synthwave music

Eighties Frankenstein films (Reanimator, Weird Science, etc.)

The monstrous feminine

Nuclear War / Cold War anxieties

Dungeons and Dragons and moral panics

 

I am looking for essays on any other topic relating to the volume’s theme.

Possible topics include but are not limited to:

Eighties teen films and S.T.

The centrality of the school to S.T. and its antecedents

The relationships between S.T. and specific eighties texts

Winona Ryder as eighties echo in S.T.

Echoes of eighties Stephen King in S.T.

            S.T. as echo of Reagan’s eighties

Echoes and uses of eighties visual culture

S.T. Fan studies and fandom

The influence of John Carpenter, Stephen Spielberg, Dan O’Bannon or other eighties filmmakers

Eighties pop music in S.T.

 

Please submit 200-500 word abstracts with a brief bio to: kwetmore@lmu.edu by April 30.

Call for respondents: The International Game of Thrones audience project

February 7, 2017 by

“Winter Is Coming”.  A slogan on anti-Erdogan posters in Turkey.  A banner carried by women at anti-Trump demonstrations.  A hand-written poster held up by desperate refugees held at the Greek border. The title of a book by former chess champion Gary Kasparov warning the West about Vladimir Putin.

The wide spread of the most popular slogan from the book and TV series Game of Thrones is truly remarkable.  It is being used by many to voice fears, anger and resistance to cruelty and inhumanity in many places.  Even George RR Martin declares ‘Winter is coming’ after Donald Trump’s victory.  But elsewhere the slogan is also being used as a quick reference point for sales brochures, training sessions, and policy initiatives.

What’s going on? How is this fiction series being taken up and used by so many different groups – far beyond its ‘fantasy’ world?  A major international project is right now trying to find out.  A team of 40 researchers in 12 countries is recruiting responses to a specially designed survey, gathering all kinds of people’s responses to Game of Thrones.  Already, 4,000 have completed the survey – which could throw light on the wide significance of this game-changing storyworld. Go to www.questeros.org to take part in the project, and see who we are.

To know more about the research and its purposes, contact Professor Martin Barker (mib@aber.ac.uk).

CFP: Transformative Works & Cultures: Tumblr & Fandom special issue

February 7, 2017 by

http://journal.transformativeworks.org/index.php/twc/announcement/view/34

Over the past five years, more and more English language transformative fandoms have gravitated to the social networking site Tumblr, moving from online communities such as LiveJournal, Dreamwidth, and Yahoo! Groups. Thus many fan communities have shifted organization structures to adapt to Tumblr’s multiple points of entry and seemingly anti-hierarchical framework. Some fans describe Tumblr as a fandom free-for-all without clear rules for engagement. Others describe this uncertain multiplicity as one of the platform’s strengths. Still others have pointed to Tumblr’s comparatively more visual interface as enabling greater global participation in heretofore monolingual fandom spaces. All of which is to say, Tumblr means many things to many people, encompassing a diversity of fandom experiences.

This special issue of TWC seeks to explore Tumblr as a (not infrequently contested) fandom platform, in which cultures of age, gender, sexuality, race, dis/ability, class, nationality, religion, language, and so on connect and sometimes clash in the contact zones of fandoms. Topics may include, but are not limited to:

* Tumblr’s influence on the production and consumption of fan fiction
* Transcultural and/or transnational fan practices and interactions on Tumblr
* Convergence of fandom and social justice concerns on Tumblr
* Tumblr fandom as a site for media literacy
* Tumblr fandom and non-normative/socially marginalized identity and community
* Marketing, media producers, and Tumblr fans
* Media discourse surrounding Tumblr fandom
* Developing aesthetics of fan work on Tumblr
* Tumblr’s role within transmedia fandom flow across platforms
* Tumblr’s cultural/discursive positioning as a youth/millennial fandom platform
* History and politics of transitioning from fandom communities (e.g. LiveJournal) to Tumblr
* How Tumblr’s interface has impacted and/or driven inter-fandom interactions and transfandom (e.g. Superwholock)

Submission guidelines

Transformative Works and Cultures (TWC, http://journal.transformativeworks.org/) is an international peer-reviewed online Gold Open Access publication of the nonprofit Organization for Transformative Works copyrighted under a Creative Commons License. TWC aims to provide a publishing outlet that welcomes fan-related topics and to promote dialogue between the academic community and the fan community. TWC accommodates academic articles of varying scope as well as other forms that embrace the technical possibilities of the Web and test the limits of the genre of academic writing.

Theory: Conceptual essays. Peer review, 6,000–8,000 words.

Praxis: Case study essays. Peer review, 5,000–7,000 words.

Symposium: Short commentary. Editorial review, 1,500–2,500 words.

Please visit TWC’s Web site (http://journal.transformativeworks.org/) for complete submission guidelines, or e-mail the TWC Editor (editor AT transformativeworks.org).

Contact—Contact guest editors Lori Morimoto, Louisa Stein, and Allison McCracken with any questions or inquiries (tumblrfandomtwc AT gmail.com).

Due date—May 1, 2017, for estimated June 2018 publication.

CFP: In Media Res: Fan Tourism

February 7, 2017 by

Fan tourism, “location vacations,” or pop-culture tourism is a growing industry across the world, changing local economies, culture, and ambiance. Fans of various pop texts and icons have been making pilgrimages to real-world locations for decades, from Abbey Road to Forks, Washington, from 221B Baker Street to Graceland, Tennessee. In Media Res is looking for explorations into fan tourism as a general cultural practice. Investigations can be through a case study of a particular fandom, location, or behavior, taking into consideration the ways that fan tourism can be beneficial and detrimental to real world economies, infrastructures, and local cultures.

Among the topics that might be examined:
Case studies of fan pilgrimages
Economic or industrial investigations of fan tourist trade
Pedagogical approaches toward teaching/studying fan tourism
Impact of fans on “destination locations” (economically/culturally/ecologically)

Proposals may be brief, but do be sure to describe the topic and key question(s) to be explored. Please submit your proposal by February 20th. If interested, please contact In Media Res (inmediares@gsu.edu) with topic proposals or for more information about the theme. Be sure to include the name of the theme week you would like to be involved within the subject line of the email.

Academics, journalists, critics, media professionals and fans are all welcome to submit proposals.

The actual piece will include either a 30-second to 3-minute clip, an image, or a slideshow that will be accompanied by a 300 to 350 word response to/contextualization of your clip, image, or slideshow. In addition to your piece, you will be expected to engage the other pieces presented that week to encourage discussion and further flesh out the individual topic in relation to the week’s theme.
About In Media Res: http://mediacommons.futureofthebook.org/imr/

CFP: QUEER SCREENS CONFERENCE 2017

January 31, 2017 by

September 2nd and 3rd 2017

The Institute of the Humanities and the Gendered Subjects Research Group at Northumbria University, Newcastle Upon Tyne, UK

Keynote speaker: Prof. Jack Halberstam (University of Southern California)

We invite submissions which tackle diverse aspects of queer representation, and that question the extent to which the new influx of queer on-screen visibility works at once both to liberate
and obfuscate certain queer identities and cultures. How, for example, should we perceive representations of the legalization of gay marriage in numerous countries, while taking into account that these changes in law also mark the entrance of queer individuals
into reproductive and familial time? In England and Wales, 2017 marks the 50th anniversary of the Sexual Offences Act, which decriminalized private homosexual acts between male individuals aged 21 or over. As such, this anniversary comes at what is arguably
a troubling time; one where right-wing nationalism spreads across the US and Europe and ‘homonationalism’ (Puar, 2007) allows for the appropriation of queer and feminist discourses so as to legitimize xenophobia and contemporary colonialism.

We encourage submissions dealing with queer representation in any on-screen form (ranging from the established forms of film and TV to gaming, music videos, advertisement,
web-series, and social media, amongst others) in what can be broadly defined as a contemporary context, promoting both explorations of the historical development of queer visibility and of its recent media examples. Additionally, we welcome further explorations
of what it means to be ‘queer’ on screen, to gaze queerly, and the value of queerness as not only a political but aesthetic term. Topics may include yet are not limited to:

● Queer intersectionality on contemporary screens
● Queer temporalities and geographies
● Specific regional, national or transnational contexts of queer representation
● The relationship between various media platforms and queer visibility
● Representations of queer activism and the (re)framing of activist debates
● The queer body and its relationship to the neoliberal context
● Adaptations and appropriations that queer canonical authors and texts
● Queering notions of success and failure in neoliberalism
● Homonationalism and its role in representation
● Queer anarchism. Queerness as a vehicle for change. Queer utopias and potentialities.


Organizers: Anamarija Horvat (anamarija.horvat@northumbria.ac.uk) &
Inmaculada N. Sánchez-García (inmaculada.garcia@northumbria.ac.uk)


Please send 300-word abstracts for 20-minute presentations and a biographical note to queerscreens2017@gmail.com by May 1st 2017.

For further information check our website: https://queerscreens2017.wixsite.com/conference


Follow us on:

https://twitter.com/queerscreens17

https://www.facebook.com/queerscreens17/

CFP: Transmedia Earth Conference 

January 31, 2017 by

TRANSMEDIA EARTH CONFERENCE: 

GLOBAL CONVERGENCE CULTURES

Hosted by EAFIT University, Medellín, Colombia

In Association with Bath Spa University, UK,

Bournemouth University, UK &
University of Vic – Central University of Catalonia, Spain

3-Day International Conference: 11th – 13th October 2017

http://the-transmedia-earth-conference.webflow.io

Confirmed Speakers:
Carlos A. Scolari, Universitat Pompeu Fabra

Dan Hassler-Forest, Utrecht University
Matthew Freeman, Bath Spa University

William Proctor, Bournemouth University

In an age where the distribution and sharing of content across multiple platforms is increasingly accessible – and the attention span of audiences even more divided as a result – transmediality has become a key strategy for engaging audiences across media.
Much has been written about the role of transmediality in a Hollywood context, with scholars defining forms of transmedia intertextuality (Kinder 1991), transmedia storytelling (Jenkins 2006; Evans 2011) and transmedia storyworlds (Scolari 2009; Wolf 2012),
with others exploring the related roles of transmedia fans (Hills 2015; Booth 2016) and models of transmedia brand advertising (Tenderich 2015; Freeman 2016). And yet different countries, cultures and peoples around the globe are now beginning to define increasing
uses for transmediality, adapting this phenomenon in unique ways to different cultures, communities, businesses and industries – be it in sectors of film, television, publishing, journalism, leisure, radio and beyond, emerging in cultural arenas as diverse
as creative writing, museums, apps, virtual reality, activism and education.

With this in mind, the Transmedia Earth Conference aims to internationalise both the study and the practice of transmediality by providing a global platform for showcasing and
exploring the many manifestations of contemporary and historical transmediality around the world. The conference benefits from a network of international partner institutions, and is a collaboration between the Media
Convergence Research Centre
 at Bath Spa University, the Department of Social Communication at EAFIT University, the Centre
for the Study of Journalism, Culture and Community
 at Bournemouth University, and the Konekto
Research Group
 at the University of Vic – Central University of Catalonia.
The inaugural conference – hosted by EAFIT University in Colombia – seeks to map emerging understandings of transmediality and global convergence cultures. We are interested in hearing from both scholars and practitioners about research that examines emerging
contexts and meanings of transmediality as well as from interested parties about cutting-edge social and technological shifts related to media convergences. We invite proposals for formal presentations and performative, digital or video based works. Proposal
topics may address, but are not limited to:

  • Transmedia storytelling and writing
  • Transmedia branding and marketing
  • Transmedia distribution and activism
  • Transmedia apps and online games
  • Transmedia web series and mobile devices
  • Transmedia audiences and fandom
  • Transmedia politics and education
  • Transmedia heritage and leisure spaces
  • Transmedia documentary and non-fiction
  • Transmediality as a transnational phenomenon

Please send proposals (300 words) along with a short biography to the conference coordinators: Matthew Freeman (m.freeman@bathspa.ac.uk), William Proctor (bproctor@bournemouth.ac.uk),
Mauricio Vásquez (mvasqu23@eafit.edu.co) and Camilo Andrés Tamayo Gómez (ctamay12@eafit.edu.co) by no later than 31 March 2017.

We are also hosting an ‘Adaptive Storyworld Challenge‘ in partnership with Conducttr, the world’s favourite transmedia storytelling engine for the creation of adaptive, interactive, multi-channel
experiences. We are looking for people that understand how to build storyworlds, and we invite submissions for an altered reality storyworld experience that is delivered to audiences across multiple media platforms. In return, Conducttr will award three winners
with a 1-year Conducttr Indie subscription, 2 hours mentorship on your project via Skype, and the projects showcased in Conducttr’s transmedia Newsletter. Full competition details and submission instructions for Conducttr’s Adaptive Storyworld Challenge can
be found here. You have until 30 September 2017 to complete your work and submit your presentation for consideration. Winners will be announced
at the Transmedia Earth Conference.
The spoken languages for the conference will be English and Spanish, with translation facilities provided.

Full conference website: http://the-transmedia-earth-conference.webflow.io/ 

CFP: Theorising the Popular Conference 2017

January 28, 2017 by

Liverpool Hope University, June 21st-22nd2017

The Popular Culture Research Group at Liverpool Hope University is delighted to announce its seventh annual international conference, ‘Theorising the Popular’. Building on the success of previous years, the 2017 conference aims to highlight the intellectual originality, depth and breadth of ‘popular’ disciplines, as well as their academic relationship with and within ‘traditional’ subjects. One of its chief goals will be to generate debate that challenges academic hierarchies and cuts across disciplinary barriers.

The conference invites submissions from a broad range of disciplines, and is particularly interested in new ways of researching ‘popular’ forms of communication and culture. In addition to papers from established and early career academics, we encourage proposals from postgraduate taught and research students.

Possible topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Film and Television
  • Media and Communications
  • Politics and Populism
  • Literature (Fiction and Non-Fiction)
  • Music
  • Drama and Performance
  • Fan Cultures
  • Sport
  • Celebrity
  • Social Media
  • Gender: Feminism/Femininities/Masculinities/Queering/Sexualities/Representations of the Body
  • Language/Linguistics

The conference will be held at Liverpool Hope’s main campus, Hope Park. Situated in a pleasant suburb of Liverpool, just four miles from the city centre, Hope Park offers superb facilities in beautiful surroundings.

Papers should be 20 minutes in length. Please send abstracts of 300 words to Dr Jacqui Miller and Dr Joshua Gulam (ttpconference@hope.ac.uk) by March 17th2017. The abstract should include your name, email address, affiliation, as well as the title of your paper.

Successful abstracts will be notified by April 3rd 2017.

Conference fees: £100 for both days, including lunch and all refreshments (£80 for students and unwaged). 

Contact Info: 

Dr Joshua Gulam (Liverpool Hope University) and Dr Jacqui Miller (Liverpool Hope University)

Contact Email: 

ttpconference@hope.ac.uk

CFP: Visualizing (in) the New Media

January 28, 2017 by

08.11.2017-10.11.2017
Neuchâtel, Switzerland

In November 2017, the Universities of Neuchâtel, Zurich and Bern in
Switzerland will host the first international conference to focus
specifically on visual communication in/about new media. In this regard, we invite the submission of abstracts for scholarly presentations in any of four overlapping thematic areas.

1. Social interaction
Here, we envisage presentations that focus on the communicative uses of visual resources in the context of new media; for example: orthography and typography, graphematic design, the use of emojis (pictograms, emoticons, smilies), and/or the social-interactional uses of video, GIFs and non-moving images.

2. Meta-discourse
Here, we envisage presentations that focus on people’s talk or writing about visual practices; for example: journalistic commentary about visual practices in new media (the use of emojis, for instance) or communicators’ discussions about their own or others’ visual practices in new media spaces.

3. Visual ideologies
Here, we envisage presentations that focus on the visual depiction of new media in, for example, the context of commercial advertising, print or broadcast news, cinema and television narratives and/or public policy and educational settings.

4. Industrial design
Here, we envisage presentations that focus on perspectives related to, for example, the visual-material design of technologies and apps, as well as the look or layout of screen interfaces, especially insofar as they concern the communicative (as opposed to technical) affordances of new media.

Kontaktperson: Etienne Morel / Christina Siever / Vanessa Jaroski
Email: contact.vinm2017@unine.ch