Posts Tagged ‘call for papers’

CFP: Pikachu’s Transmedia Adventures: The Continuing Adaptability of the Pokemon Franchise

June 8, 2021

In 2021, the Pokemon franchise celebrates the 25th anniversary of its debut in Japan and the fifth anniversary of its popular worldwide AR cellphone game Pokemon Go. In fact, Pokemon is arguably experiencing something of a resurgence and renaissance within the current cultural moment. When a pop-up Pokemon Centre store was opened in London in 2018 to mark the release of Sword and Shield, queues for entering the retail space frequently had to be closed due to demand whilst product lines regularly sold out on a daily basis. In 2019, when the long-running cartoon’s main character Ash Ketchum finally won a Pokemon tournament, major news sites humorously deemed this victory a newsworthy event (Bissett 2019). More recently, a revival in Pokemon card collecting has left retail shelves bare and scalpers running rampant whilst mint-condition ‘graded’ cards have sold for hundreds of thousands of dollars at auction (Koebler 2021). Meanwhile, the games themselves continue to be adapted to Nintendo’s console platforms, with the Nintendo Switch releasing both remakes of previously popular titles (Pokemon Let’s Go! Pikachu and Let’s Go! Eevee, Pokemon Snap) as well as new titles exploring hitherto unknown regions (Pokemon Sword and Shield). Much more than a franchise intended to commercially target and exploit children, the Pokemon franchise represents an enduringly popular intellectual property that continues to attract interest across generations. 

Despite this, in-depth and continuous academic study of this hugely popular intellectual property has been infrequent at best. In fact, the last time that a dedicated collection of essays exploring the franchise in a holistic manner was published was in 2004, with many of the contributors positioning the property as a ‘fad’ whose cycle of popularity was apparently at its end (see Tobin 2004; N.B. the augmented reality game Pokemon Go (Niantic 2016- ) has bucked this trend by generating considerable academic attention – see Kulak, Purzycki, Henthorn and Vie 2019; Saker and Evans 2021). Where Pokemon has attracted infrequent academic discussion, this has occurred in the context of assessing how wider cultural flows from Japan to the West have impacted on children’s media (Allison 2006; O’Melia 2020). What is absent, then, is a volume that takes the Pokemon franchise on its own terms and which situates the property within a much-changed media environment. Thus, a study is needed which considers Pokemon in terms of multiple contemporary debates within media and cultural studies. These include – but are no way limited to – cultural, technological, and media convergence (Jenkins 2006), discourses of transmediality and media mix (Steinberg 2012; Williams 2020), paratextuality (Gray 2010), licensing and/or (transgenerational) media industries studies (Santo 2015; Johnson 2019), material culture (Geraghty 2014; Bainbridge 2017) and fan cultures (Scott 2019; Stanfill 2019). Whether approached as a transmedia franchise, corporate intellectual property, system offering ludic possibilities, fan community, or otherwise, academic scholarship should better consider how the Pokemon franchise has engaged with, adapted to, and challenged the contours of the ever-evolving transmedia environment.

This call for papers seeks abstracts of 300-500 words for chapters of approx. 6000 words that explore topics including (but not are limited to):

  • The Industrial development of The Pokemon Company and its corporate relations with Nintendo and other licensed partners.
  • Pokemon and the historical development of media industries studies.
  • The evolution of Pokemon: The Card Game and its relationship to industrial contexts.
  • The evolution of the Pokemon computer games (e.g. games studies perspectives; remediation relating to Let’s Go!, Snap, etc.)
  • Pokemon and/as character licensing.
  • Pokemon and transmedia storytelling and/as transmedia text.
  • Pokemon, transmedia tourismand the Experience Economy (e.g. the Pokemon Cafe; the annual Pikachu Parade).
  • Pokemon Go and developments in augmented reality experiences and/or the gamification of space.
  • Detective Pikachu and Pokemon’s other cinematic adaptations.
  • Pokemon’s historical developments as anime.
  • Pokemon’s historical developmentsas manga
  • Pokemon and/as fan fashion (e.g. high-fashion licensees, jewelry, make-up).
  • Pokemon and/as paratextual theory.
  • Interventions concerning Pokemon and identity politics (e.g. feminism, critical race theory, queer theory).
  • Pokemon and/as the global expansion of kawaii/cute culture.
  • Thematic analyses of the Pokemon franchise (e.g. its ties with environmentalism).
  • Pokemon’s links to Japanese ‘soft power’.
  • Fan practices and transformative works related to the Pokemon franchise across multiple forms and platforms.
  • Pokemon and/as children’s culture.

We are especially interested in soliciting chapters featuring non-Western perspectives as well as ones engaging with historically marginalised or underrepresented groups. 

We hope to include work from both established and emerging scholars; junior scholars & graduate students are encouraged to apply.

Please email abstracts of 300-500 words with an accompanying Author Bio of approx. 150 words to Ross Garner (GarnerRP1@Cardiff.ac.uk) and EJ Nielsen (ejnielsen.ephemera@gmail.com) by 27 August, 2021.

CFP: Participatory Culture Wars: Controversy, Conflict and Complicity in Fandom 

May 7, 2021

***Call for papers and contributions for an edited collection*** 

Participatory Culture Wars: Controversy, Conflict and Complicity in Fandom 

Edited by Dr Simone Driessen, Bethan Jones, Dr Benjamin Litherland. 

It has become increasingly clear that fandoms and participatory culture are sites of controversy, conflict and even complicity, complicating earlier assessments that sought to celebrate creativity, collegiality, and community. As we continue to make sense of the consequences of web 2.0, the study of fans – the affective bonds, identities, and productive cultures of a highly mediated and networked society – is vital in understanding our current moment, whether expressed in debates about “cancel culture” or ongoing “culture wars”. Fans have had to rethink and reassess their relationships to fan objects, consider their role in reproducing global systems of inequality, and reflect on the meaning of participation in an era that is marked by both moral ambivalence and political earnestness.  

Implicitly and explicitly, fannish practices are involved in a variety of key social, political, and cultural issues across the globe. They can be seen in politics, ranging from QAnon’s role in the storming of the US Capitol building, conspiracy theories relating to the covid pandemic, and the continued expansion of the global reactionary and populist right, from Britain to India to Brazil. They can be seen in new cultural terrains produced by networked movements like #MeToo, Black Lives Matter, #OscarsSoWhite, and the accompanying activism and responses as fans come to terms with the crimes, misdemeanors, and disagreements of former faves, like Xiao Zhan, Joss Whedon, or JK Rowling. They are expressed in the strategies and tactics of inter- and intra-fandom conflicts, whether Meghan Markle and the Royal Family or some Chinese fan responses to BTS talking about the Korean war. And, pressingly, fan tourism, collector culture, and the energy use of digital culture all contribute to the ongoing climate crisis.  

Scholars of participatory culture can play a key role in assessing many and more of these issues, but they will also have significant and ongoing impact on the way we conceptualize fans, fandoms, and participatory culture. This work builds on developing themes in the field. Ongoing scholarship about racism, sexism, and homophobia in prominent fan spaces is vital (Massanari, 2017; Pande, 2020; Scott, 2019), and Jonathan Gray’s conception of anti-fandom (2003; 2005; 2007) is an important moment in indicating the darker underbelly of fan cultures. Yet scholarship on QAnon and Trump fandom (Reinhardt, forthcoming; Miller, 2020), cancel and commenting culture (Clark, 2020; Ng, 2020; Barnes, 2018), reactionary fandom (Stanfill, 2020), ethical consumption (Wood, Litherland & Reed, 2020; Tyler, 2021) and serial killer fandom (Nacos, 2015; Rico, 2015) pose important questions which cannot be answered simply by reference to anti- or toxic fandom.  

This collection brings together some of these authors and perspectives while developing and extending these debates. We are keen to broaden the scope of the issue so that studies of fans of film and television are included alongside studies of music, literary, theatre, sports and politics. And we are especially eager to include case studies beyond the anglophone and global north. We are also interested in the practices of organizations in fan-adjacent areas such as marketing, production, branding and influencer culture. We welcome traditional essays and research papers and non-traditional formats, such as roundtables, interviews, and think-pieces, from people inside and outside of the academy. Topics might include but are not limited to: 

·        Conspiracy theories and/as fandom. 

·        ‘Culture wars’, intra- and inter-fan conflicts, and other broader disagreements or discontent about the meaning and values of popular cultural texts.  

·        The consequences of anti-fandom and toxic fandom. 

·        Expressions and practices of ethical consumption, whether via “cancel culture”, commodity activism or similar. 

·        The moral economies of fandom, and their consequences for the media and cultural industries. 

·        The ethical implications of participation, whether through fan activism, dark fandom or other. 

·        The environmental impact of fandom, from NFTs to fan tourism. 

 
Please send an abstract of 300 words, along with a short author biography of 150 words to participatoryculturewars@gmail.com by 31 July 2021. Please also address any queries to this email address. 

CFP: ECREA TV Studies Section MAB Joint Conference

January 31, 2015

TV in the age of transnationalisation and transmedialisation: a two-day, international conference

Date: Monday 22nd and Tuesday 23rd JUNE 2015

Venue: University of Roehampton, London, UK

Organisers: ECREA Television Studies section and the Media Across Borders network (www.mediaacrossborders.com)

Television is crossing borders in multiple ways. Throughout much of the 20th century it seemed to resemble the geometrical elements of a Kandinsky painting from the Bauhaus phase: each element clearly distinct but overlapping and carefully positioned in relation to other elements. Television was perceived and studied similarly; mostly separate from the other mass media, including film, radio, video games or consumer magazines. Moreover, in Europe television content was clearly separated from advertising through the distinction, or separation principle. In addition to these distinct media elements, state borders clearly separated television markets in the perception of academics, audiences and TV executives. After all, television was mostly conceived and regulated by state institutions and predominately broadcast and consumed within state borders. Cross-border production and trade in television programmes were consequently viewed as international; organised between national institutions and companies. But gradual and ongoing transnationalisation and transmedialisation are making the neat geometrical forms more and more permeable, manifold and unsteady. Kokoschka’s style of painting, blurred and blended, seems a more appropriate metaphor to describe today’s television-scapes. This conference offers a space to reflect on the changes pertaining to the processes and workings of transmedialisation and transnationalisation, and on the theoretical and methodological consequences this has for television studies. It also offers opportunities for networking.

Papers are invited on topics related to television’s transnationalisation and transmedialisation, including:
• Transnational and international production and distribution of TV programmes
• Transmedia/cross-media storytelling (with global examples particularly welcome)
• The trade in TV Formats
• Adaptations and remakes of international franchises
• Localization of television and related content at the textual and paratextual levels
• Dubbing, subtitling and re-versioning of television content
• Marketing and branding of global (trans)media franchises
• Global television aesthetics
• Transnational television consumption and reception
• Professional negotiations of internationalisation, transnationalisation and localisation
• Organisational relationships and trends in a transmedialising/transnationalising media environment
• Attempts to re-conceptualise television and television markets
• Theoretical reflections on the international, transnational, global, national and/or local
• Methodological reflections: researching television in the age of transnationalisation and transmedialisation

Plenary speakers
Liz Evans (University of Nottingham)

Giselinde Kuipers (University of Amsterdam)

Industry panel to be confirmed but will include Senior TV Executives from BBC Worldwide, Channel 4, FremantleMedia, HBO Europe, Media Xchange, Northern Europe and 360 Degree, Shine International and/or Warner Bros.

Information/details
Submit your max. 300 word abstract along with institutional affiliation and a short bio (max. 150 words), or a panel proposal (minimum 3 speakers, 300 words rationale plus 300 words per paper, relating them to the focus of the conference to Lothar Mikos (l.mikos@hff-potsdam.de) and Andrea Esser (a.esser@roehampton.ac.uk) by March 9, 2015.

Decisions on abstracts will be communicated by 6th April 2015.

The conference fee for ECREA and MAB members is £95 waged (approx. 127 euro/$144; £45 unwaged/student (approx. 60 euro/$68/); for non-members it is £110 waged (approx. 147 euro/$167 and £55 unwaged/student (approx. 72 euro/$83/). The fee includes lunch and refreshments for both days and a drinks reception.

Conference papers on TV Formats will be considered for a special issue on ‘Trade in TV Formats’, for VIEW: Journal of European Television History and Culture (http://journal.euscreen.eu/index.php/view) for publication in June 2016. The issue is jointly edited by John Ellis (Royal Holloway/University of London), Andrea Esser (University of Roehampton, London) and Juan Francisco Gutiérrez Lozano (University of Málaga/Spain).

The conference is hosted by the University of Roehampton’s Centre for Research in Film and Audiovisual Cultures (CRFAC) in the Department of Media, Culture & Language.

Please direct any academic queries to Dr. Andrea Esser (a.esser@roehampton.ac.uk), other queries to Julia Noyce on julia.noyce@roehampton.ac.uk or 0208 392 3698.