Archive for June, 2015

CFP: Journal of Fandom Studies special issue on ethics in fan studies

June 28, 2015

SPECIAL ISSUE ON ETHICS IN FAN STUDIES CALL FOR PAPERS

In November 2014 an article by Adrienne Evans and Mafalda Stasi appeared in Participations calling for us as a field to consider whether a unified methodology is necessary or desirable for the field. In April 2015 the conversation at the Journal of Fandom Studies roundtable during the annual Popular Culture Association conference quickly turned to the dual (and perhaps inextricably related) topics of methodology and ethics in fan studies.

This month that conversation will continue at the Fan Studies Network 2015 conference during a workshop on ethics.  As the description of that workshop suggests, there are several questions we have all been grappling with for quite some time, questions that have become perhaps more pressing in the light of increasing use of social media by fans and increasing attention from the media on fan activities.  The four questions posed during this workshop: “what should ethics in fan studies look like, do we need a standard ethical framework; how should fan studies scholars approach ethical issues in their work; what does the future of the field hold” all raise discreet questions of their own.

This special issue of The Journal of Fandom Studies aims to examine these and related questions.  How do we define privacy? Do we need to re-examine the notion of the aca-fan? Where are our boundaries as researchers? As fans? When do we need IRB approval? To what extent might our desire to “protect” fans actually being doing a disservice to the fans and the field?

Please submit proposals for papers (250-400 words) by August 15, 2015 to journaloffandomstudies@gmail.com.

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Call for Chapter Proposals: Doctor Who and History

June 25, 2015

Deadline: 1 September 2015 (contributors will be notified within two weeks of the deadline)

When Sydney Newman created a new family-orientated show for the BBC back in early 1963, he envisioned it as being, in John Reith’s terms, to “educate, inform and entertain”, one in which all stories “were to be based on scientific and historical facts as we knew them at that time”. It was no coincidence therefore that consequently the Doctor took on board the TARDIS a science teacher and a history teacher to learn from and share in his travels. “How wonderful,” Newman would later recall, “if today’s humans could find themselves on the shores of England seeing and getting mixed up with Caesar’s army in 54 BC, landing to take over the country; be in Rome burning as Nero fiddles; get involved in Europe’s tragic 30 years war, etc.” There would be no bug-eyed monsters, Newman warned, and the Doctor was not allowed to interfere in history, only to observe.

Over fifty years later, Doctor Who has itself become part of the cultural history of Britain, and its many stories across television, audio plays and books – whether set in the past or populated with the inevitable bug-eyed-monsters – have engaged directly and indirectly with important contemporary and historical issues, characters and events.

We invite contributions for an edited volume that focuses on Doctor Who and History: A Cultural Perspective. While there have been many publications recently celebrating the show’s longevity, or those reflecting on the programme as a product of the BBC as British institution, this volume focuses specifically on the topic of history. This publication promotes a scholarly and interdisciplinary approach to Doctor Who, exploring how the programme reflects on and contributes to notions of history. 

Doctor Who engages with history in multifarious ways and can therefore reveal much about how history is practised, produced, consumed and remediated. Chapter proposals may therefore seek to explore Doctor Who from a diverse range of academic approaches (e.g. media studies; reception theory; fan studies; education) and should draw on and identify appropriate historiographical methods and debates. It is envisaged that the collection will speak both to the programme and to history as a subject area.

Your contribution may focus on the classic series, the reboot (or both), the Big Finishaudios, original novels, or fan fiction.

That said, your contribution might focus on some aspect of

*Reflections in the programme of particular social and political eras and events

*How the show engages with historical cultural icons

*How the show expresses a continuing dialogue with literature, folklore, and mythology

*Tensions between academic and ‘public history’, between history from above and below

* How changing approaches to history and alterations in understanding of historical fact have impacted upon the show

*Non-canonical historical travels or themes

*The interaction of media and technologies in how they inform the practice of history in the programme

*Developments in the Doctor’s strict policy of non-intervention – or not

*Case studies of the ‘pure historicals’/pseudo historicals/celebrity historicals

Topics already under consideration include the depiction of Nero and the early Roman Empire in 1965’s The Romans, imagery of the Holocaust, focalisation techniques in lost story Marco Polo, and an investigation into the cultural practices and social sign-posting in The Awakening

Proposals/abstracts should be 300-350 words in length and sent as a Word file. Accepted proposals will be developed into5000-8000 word essays (including notes and references). Please send your abstract (and all correspondence) to Carey Fleiner, University of Winchester (carey.fleiner@winchester.ac.uk) James A. Jordan, University of Southampton (J.A.Jordan@soton.ac.uk) and Dene October, University of Arts London (d.october@lcc.arts.ac.uk

See https://doctorwhoandhistory.wordpress. for details

Special TWC Issue CFP: Queer Female Fandom

June 24, 2015

Special TWC Issue CFP: Queer Female Fandom

This special issue is the first dedicated to femslash, and it aims to collect and put in dialogue emerging research and criticism on the subject, from histories of lesbian fandom to current fan activities around queer female characters and pairings.

F/F, girlslash, altfic, saffic, and most commonly, femslash: the multiplicity of terms for female same-sex pairings attests to the heterogeneous and variable history of these fannish subcultures. While the male variety (occupying the default label, slash) has received sustained scholarly attention since the 1980s, femslash as a distinct phenomenon continues to exist on the margins of both media fandom and fan studies.

As mainstream representation and online platforms have evolved, fan practices around female-female couples are becoming increasingly vibrant and visible, and a proliferation of explicitly lesbian or bisexual characters in film and television has captivated fans and researchers alike. This work points the way to a productive investigation of the turbulent boundaries between canon and subtext, between femslash and slash communities, between erotic and political interventions, and between different methodological approaches to queer female audiences (broadly conceived) – boundaries that femslash itself troubles.

Topics may include, but are not limited to:

case studies of femslash
subcultures and fanworks
femslash dynamics and demographics
platforms, archives, and communities
diachronic or comparative analyses
feminist investments in centering women
debates about queerbaiting and the politics of visibility
queer female authorship in gift/commercial economies
transnational circulation of queer female texts
yuri (girls’ love) and other non-western femslash iterations

Submission guidelines
Transformative Works and Cultures (TWC, http://journal.transformativeworks.org/) is an international peer-reviewed online Gold Open Access publication of the nonprofit Organization for Transformative Works copyrighted under a Creative Commons License. TWC aims to provide a publishing outlet that welcomes fan-related topics and to promote dialogue between the academic community and the fan community. TWC accommodates academic articles of varying scope as well as other forms that embrace the technical possibilities of the Web and test the limits of the genre of academic writing. 



Theory: Conceptual essays. Peer review, 6,000–8,000 words.
Praxis: Case study essays. Peer review, 5,000–7,000 words.
Symposium: Short commentary. Editorial review, 1,500–2,500 words.


Please visit TWC’s Web site (http://journal.transformativeworks.org/) for complete submission guidelines, or e-mail the TWC Editor (editor AT transformativeworks.org).

Contact
Contact guest editor Julie Levin Russo (The Evergreen State College) and Eve Ng (Ohio University) with any questions or inquiries at queerfemalefandom[AT] gmail.com.

Due date
Contributions are due March 1, 2016.

CFP: Adaptation, Awards Culture, and the Value of Prestige, edited collection

June 21, 2015

CFP (Edited Collection):
Adaptation, Awards Culture, and the Value of Prestige

Adaptation studies has recently grown into a vibrant, wide-ranging field of study. Scholars in literary, media, and cultural studies have used the concepts of adaptation and intertextuality to explore how content negotiates the transition from text to image, image to text, and across media platforms and/or cultures of production and reception.

One of the key factors at stake in these intermedial transitions is the question of cultural prestige. As the written word loses ground to the moving image, it retains or even gains prestige as a locus of cultural, aesthetic, and ethical value. In screen studies, the rise of television studies in conjunction with and in contrast to film studies raises similar issues of cultural esteem. Greater critical attention to comics and graphic novels has also presented a challenge to received notions of literary and visual aesthetics. Adaptation across these and other forms is frequently, if not always explicitly, shaped by these perceptions of cultural value, and the rise of cultural prizes, or what James F. English has called the “economy of prestige,” marks one of the clearest (if not always uncontested) declarations of value in the culture industries. Yet this intersection between adaptation and the institutional prestige of awards–whether honoring accomplishment on the page, on the stage, or on various screens–remains largely unexplored.

Focusing on this intersection of adaptation, awards culture, and notions of value, this collection will address the relationship between literary, cinematic, and other cultural prizes and the process of adapting contemporary texts in and across a variety of media. We invite essays that approach this topic from cultural, social, and textual perspectives, and will consider essays that examine a broad base of prizes and assessments of cultural value, including awards made to authors, directors, artists, creators, performers, etc. involved on either side of the adaptive process.

Key questions we wish to consider include:

How is cultural value encoded into the adaptation process?
How is value embodied in cinematic, literary, televisual, theatrical, and other cultural texts?
How do adaptations shape or transform the careers of writers, directors, and performers?
How does adaptation interact with processes of canonization, both in literature and in other media?
How are specific textual features on both sides of the adaptation process affected by questions of cultural prestige?
How have recipients of particular prizes (Nobel, Booker, Pulitzer, Academy Awards, Golden Globes, Emmy, Tony, etc.) been adapted in different media?
To what extent is prestige transferable across media?

Topics to consider include:

Adapted Screenplay and similar awards
Television adaptations
Remakes and reboots
Auteurism and adaptation
Performance in adapted works
Adaptations of serial works
Genre fiction and adaptation
Textual and paratextual signifiers of cultural value
Reception of adapted texts
Festival awards and adaptation

A major academic publisher has expressed preliminary interest in this project. The editors are committed to publishing the volume within a reasonable time frame, and to keeping all contributors fully informed of its progress.

Please submit 200-300 word abstracts to Eric.Sandberg [at] oulu.fi AND kenkar [at] bilkent.edu.tr by August 15, 2015. Notice of acceptance will be sent to contributors no later than September 15, and the deadline for full essays (no longer than 6000 words) will be January 25, 2016.

About the editors

Colleen Kennedy-Karpat is Assistant Professor in the Department of Communication and Design at Bilkent University, Turkey, where she teaches film and media studies. She is the author of Rogues, Romance, and Exoticism in French Cinema of the 1930s (2013) and has published essays on Bill Murray and Wes Anderson as well as the self-adapted films of Marjane Satrapi.

Eric Sandberg is University Lecturer in Literature at the University of Oulu, Finland. He teaches British and American literature, and works on the twentieth and twenty-first century novel, genre fiction, and modernism. He is the author of Virginia Woolf: Experiments in Character (2014) and has also published on topics ranging from hardboiled detective fiction to the novels of Hilary Mantel.

CFP: Transformative Works and Cultures Special Issue on Sherlock Holmes

June 18, 2015

Transformative Works and Cultures Special Issue CFP: SHERLOCK HOLMES
FANDOM, SHERLOCKIANA, and THE GREAT GAME (3/1/16; 3/15/17)

Sherlock Holmes has attracted devoted fans almost since the date of first
publication in 1887.  The oldest still-existing Sherlockian society, the
Baker Street Irregulars, was founded in 1934, while the Sherlock Holmes
Society of London dates from 1951.  More recent additions to the
ever-growing network of organized Sherlock Holmes literary societies
include the formerly all-female Adventuresses of Sherlock Holmes, and fan groups in the media fandom model have arisen, such as the Baker Street
Babes and other online communities. This special issue seeks to engage
both academics and fans in writing about the older, long established
Sherlockian fandom. We welcome papers that address all fandoms of Sherlock Holmes and its adaptations, particularly those that trace the connections and similarities/differences among and between older and newer fandoms.

We welcome submissions dealing with, but not limited to, the following
topics:
* Questions of nomenclature, cultural distinction, class, race, gender, and sexuality 
* The role of Sherlockian fandom and the Great Game in fandom history
* Academic histories of Sherlockian fandom, both organized and informal
* Connections between new adaptation-based fandoms and the older fandom
* Fan productions, e.g., pastiche, fan works, and Sherlockian writings on the Canon 
* Influence of intellectual property law and norms on adaptations and fan
productions
* Sherlockian publishing, e.g., MX, Titan, BSI Press or Wessex Press
* Community, e.g., Sherlockians on the Internet or Sherlockian ‘real
world’ gatherings
* Specific national fandoms, e.g., Japanese or Chinese Sherlock Holmes
reception 
 
*Submission guidelines* Transformative Works and Cultures (TWC,
http://journal.transformativeworks.org/) is an international peer-reviewed
online Gold Open Access publication of the nonprofit Organization for
Transformative Works copyrighted under a Creative Commons License. TWC aims to provide a publishing outlet that welcomes fan-related topics and to promote dialogue between the academic community and the fan community. TWC accommodates academic articles of varying scope as well as other forms that embrace the technical possibilities of the Web and test the limits of the genre of academic writing.

Theory: Conceptual essays. Peer review, 6,000–8,000 words.
Praxis: Case study essays. Peer review, 5,000–7,000 words.
Symposium: Short commentary. Editorial review, 1,500–2,500 words.

Please visit TWC’s Web site (http://journal.transformativeworks.org/) for
complete submission guidelines, or e-mail the TWC Editor (editor@
transformativeworks.org).

*Contact* Contact guest editor Betsy Rosenbaum and Roberta Pearson with
any questions or inquiries attwcsherlock@gmail.com.

*Due date* Contributions are due March 1, 2016

CFP: 7th Biennial Slayage Conference on the Whedonverses

June 17, 2015

Call for Papers
7th Biennial Slayage Conference on the Whedonverses
Kingston University, Kingston upon Thames, England, UK

7-10 July 2016

Slayage: The Journal of the Whedon Studies Association, the Whedon Studies Association, and conveners Stacey Abbott and Tanya R. Cochran solicit proposals for the seventh biennial Slayage Conference on the Whedonverses (SCW7). This conference dedicated to the imaginative universe(s) of Joss Whedon will be held on the campus of Kingston University, Kingston upon Thames, England, UK, 7-10 July 2016. Simon Brown of Kingston University will serve as local arrangements chair, supported by the Euroslayage organizing committee Bronwen Calvert, Lorna Jowett, and Michael Starr.

We welcome proposals of 200-300 words (or an abstract of a completed paper) on any aspect of Whedon’s television and web texts (Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Angel, FireflyDr. Horrible’s Sing-Along Blog, DollhouseMarvel’s Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.); his films (Serenity, The Cabin in the Woods, Marvel’s The Avengers, Much Ado About Nothing); his comics (e.g. Fray; Astonishing X-Men; Runaways; Buffy the Vampire Slayer Season Eight, Nine, and Ten; Angel: After the Fall; Angel & Faith Season Nine andTen); or any element of the work of Whedon and his collaborators. Additionally, a proposal may address paratexts, fandoms, or Whedon’s extracurricular—political and activist—activities, such as his involvement with Equality Now. As this is the firstSlayage conference to take place in Europe, we also welcome proposals about Whedon’s work in relation to notions of Britishness, heritage, globalization, language, as well as its transnational and international reception. We invite presentations from the perspective of any discipline: literature, history, communications, film and television studies, women’s studies, religion, linguistics, music, cultural studies, and others. In other words, multidisciplinary discussions of the text, the social context, the audience, the producers, the production, and more are all appropriate. A proposal/abstract should demonstrate familiarity with already-published scholarship in the field, which includes dozens of books, hundreds of articles, and over a dozen years of the blind peer-reviewed journal Slayage.

An individual paper is strictly limited to a reading time of 20 minutes, and we encourage, though do not require, self-organized panels of three presenters. Proposals for workshops, roundtables, or other types of sessions are also welcome. Submissions by graduate and undergraduate students are invited; undergraduates should provide the name, email, and phone number of a faculty member willing to consult with them (the faculty member does not need to attend). Proposals should be submitted online through the SCW7 website and will be reviewed by program chairs Stacey Abbott, Tanya R. Cochran, and Rhonda V. Wilcox.Submissions must be received byMonday, 4 January 2016. Decisions will be made by 1 March 2016. Questions regarding proposals can be directed to Rhonda V. Wilcox at the conference email address: slayage.conference@gmail.com

Call for Papers: European Fan Cultures 2015 Conference, Erasmus University Rotterdam, the Netherlands 12-13 November, 2015

June 15, 2015

European Fan Cultures 2015

Erasmus University Rotterdam, the Netherlands
12-13 November, 2015

Academic studies are increasingly paying attention to active audiences and participatory cultures. The figure of the fan – the enthusiastic, adoring, productive, but critical audience member perhaps best captures these cultures. Both online and offline, fans have their own subcultures, habits and local practices based around their relationship with a range of media texts and objects, both domestic and global.

Fandom represents what it means to engage with popular culture today. Fans are active, inspired and passionate followers of media content. Yet, the meaning-making processes of fans can vary greatly, especially when taking a geographical perspective. The diversity of Europe offers an interesting setting to explore the broad variety of fan practices, raising questions such as: How do fans understand objects of global or transnational pop-culture in their national or local context? How is one’s national identity of influence in (global) fan activism? What challenges unfold when fan production happens in the local language (e.g. fan fiction or fan forums)?

The conference will feature Professor dr. Cornell Sandvoss (University of Huddersfield) as a keynote speaker. He is the author of Fans: The Mirror of Consumption (2005), and co-editor of Fandom: Identities and Communities in a Mediated World (2007). His keynote will focus on “The Value of Belonging: Fans, Place and Postnationalism in Europe”.

European Fan Cultures 2015 invites inspiring talks about European fan studies and related topics. The topic of fans and fan cultures connects a wide range of disciplines, which is why we welcome scholars who investigate (but not limited to) audiences, media, leisure, tourism, games and celebrities. Early career scholars and PhD students are especially invited to contribute. We welcome proposals on, but not limited to, the following topics:

European Fan Cultures
Local fandom and audience cultures
National identity in media tourism, music and sports
Transcultural fandom
Politics and fandom

Media and European fandoms
Fan activism
Fan works and practices
Anti-fandom
Reception of video games, music, television
Construction of celebrity images

Methods and Approaches
Challenges of local fan studies, such as language issues
(Internet) ethnography
Ethics of researching fans, users and consumers

Please submit an abstract of max. 250 words (plus 3 key words to help classify your submission) and a short biography (including your name, email address, institutional affiliation and position) by the 22nd of July to Simone Driessen at: efc@eshcc.eur.nl

Notifications of acceptance will be send out before the 5th of August. There is a fee of 80€ which covers participations costs (including lunch and refreshments on both days).

CFP: SCMS 2016: Girl Fandoms: Labor, Identity, and Cultural Appropriation

June 5, 2015

Society for Cinema and Media Studies, 2016 Conference
Atlanta, GA, March 20—April 3, 2016

 This panel seeks to explore the cultural production of girl fans across media, history, and global geographies, while shedding new light on the ways young female fan labor has contributed to economically profitable media industries.

Possible paper topics include, but are not limited to:

The cultural significance of young female audiences’ affective labor 

Fan labor and gift economies 

Teen magazines and girls’ contributions

Girls’ movie clubs and other fan organizations

Girl fandoms and the negotiation of alternative identities

Girl fans and queerness

Girl fandoms and feminisms: Riot Grrrls, Tavi Gevinson, Rookie webzine

The antecedents of girls’ DIY culture: the archive of girl fandoms

Fandom and manual work: mix tapes, zines, bedroom wall art, collages, handmade toys

Digital culture: gaming, youtube tutorials, blog posts, image-centered applications (Pinterest, Instagram), fan-made tribute websites, fan fiction

Researching the ways girls worship media idols across the globe: The Beatles, Taylor Swift, Shirley Temple, One Direction, Justin Bieber, KPop, the Twilight series, and much more.

Please send a 250-word abstract and a short bio to Dr. Diana Anselmo-Sequeira at danselmo@uci.edu by June 15, 2015. Decisions will be communicated by June 25.