Archive for the ‘Uncategorized’ Category

CFP: The Future of Fandom 

August 3, 2017

Transformative Works and Cultures CFP: The Future of Fandom (1/15/18; 9/15/18)


This special 10th anniversary issue of Transformative Works and Cultures seeks to explore the future of fandom while looking back to its past. How might scholarship on fandom’s past and present invite speculation about its future? And what might the
possible futures invoked by technological, ecological, and political discourses mean for fandom’s communities and practices? Science fiction in particular–the field whose strategies spawned fandom, and the genre in which much fan activity occurs–has used
imagined futures to shed new light on the present and the past. In turn, studying where we are and where we have been allows us to imagine where we may be heading.

We invite essays that seek to historicize and contextualize fans, fan works, and fandoms across past, present, and future. Scholarship on fandom’s futures can open connections between technology and interfaces, fannish discussions and trends, fictions of imagined
futures, and cultural and political changes in order to illustrate how fandoms may be understood in their historical contexts and cultural interactions.

This issue will feature a special section, “Predictions,” that will allow fans and academics to imagine fannish futures. We particularly invite personal and creative responses, including essays from the future, documenting trends that haven’t yet come to be.

Possible topics include but are not limited to:
 * How have interfaces affected fannish communities and production, and how may these change in the future?
 * How do demographic shifts in fandom and new voices change fan works and communities? How have new generations of fans changed fandom?
 * How have the intersection and interactions between industry and audiences changed, and how may they change in the future?
 * How do fannish futures look from different global locations, and what will transnational landscapes of fandom look like in the future?
 * How is the fannish future gendered and racialized? How have fans created or imagined different futures for queerness, transness, disability?
 * How have fandoms engaged with Afrofuturism, Chicanafuturism, Indigenous futurism, and other literary, cultural, and social movements challenging the whiteness of the imagined future?
 * How has the commercialization of fan works changed over time, and how will it play out in the future legally, economically, or socially? Is there still a clear distinction between fan and pro writers?
 * How have social and cultural changes affect the intersections between politics and fandom? How do these changes connect to fannish social activism?
 * What changes in the source material and media, in fannish social organization, platforms, and technology, in fannish access, culture, and demographics do we see emerging as we look ahead?
 * How does the increasing mainstreaming of fannish behavior affect fannish identities and behaviors? How does it alter mainstream audiences’ engagement with fannish subcultures and media industries.
 * What will fandom be 10 years from now, or 20? Are there some things that never change, that make us what we are––and if so, what?

Submission guidelines: Transformative Works and Cultures (TWC,
http://journal.transformativeworks.org/
) is an international peer-reviewed online Gold Open Access publication of the nonprofit Organization for Transformative Works copyrighted under a Creative Commons License. TWC aims to provide a publishing outlet that
welcomes fan-related topics and to promote dialogue between the academic community and the fan community. TWC accommodates academic articles of varying scope as well as other forms that embrace the technical possibilities of the Web and test the limits of
the genre of academic writing.

    Theory: Conceptual essays. Peer review, 6,000–8,000 words.
    Praxis: Case study essays. Peer review, 5,000–7,000 words.
    Symposium: Short commentary. Editorial review, 1,500–2,500 words.

Contact: Please visit TWC’s Web site (http://journal.transformativeworks.org/) for complete submission guidelines, or e-mail the TWC Editor (editor@transformativeworks.org).

Due date: January 15, 2018, for estimated September 15, 2018 publication.

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CFP: Wentworth is the New Prisoner – 5 & 6 April 2018, RMIT University, Melbourne, Australia

July 21, 2017
Wentworth is the New Prisoner
A two-day international conference
Thursday 5th and Friday 6th April 2018RMIT University, Melbourne, Australia

Confirmed keynote speakers and panellists:

Professor Sue Turnbull (University of Wollongong, Australia);
Kim Akass (University of Hertfordshire, UK);
Kate Hood (actress, writer and director, aka Prisoner’s Kath Maxwell);
Jan Russ (casting director, PrisonerNeighbours, etc.)

Wentworth (aka Wentworth Prison) is an award-winning Australian prison drama series now in its fifth season and recently renewed for a sixth season. It screens in Australia on Foxtel, in the UK on Channel 5 and in the USA on Netflix. The series was inspired by Prisoner (aka Cell Block H), a groundbreaking drama produced between 1979 and 1986, which was internationally successful and led to a cult following. Set in a women’s prison in contemporary Melbourne, Wentworth dramatises current cultural and political issues, and provides a rich example of creative and industrial screen practice that can often be read in the context of its predecessor, Prisoner.

This conference will unite those who study and are fans of Wentworth and Prisoner, with those who are or who have been involved in making the series.

We invite abstracts for papers (critical or creative, 20 minutes) from academics, practitioners or those who are both, including research degree candidates and early career researchers. All topics related to Wentworth and Prisoner will be considered, with the aim of generating a lively exchange of critical and creative ideas. Our intention is that selected papers from the conference will lead to a publication (most likely an edited collection).

Conference organising committee:

Associate Professor Craig Batty (RMIT University); Dr Tessa Dwyer (Monash University); Dr Radha O’Meara (University of Melbourne); Dr Stayci Taylor (RMIT University).

Please email your 300-word paper abstract, along with a 100-word biography, to governorwentworth@gmail.com by Monday 30 October 2017.

Potential paper and panel topics include, but are not limited to:

●      Gender in Wentworth/Prisoner

●      Sexuality and Queerness in Wentworth/Prisoner

●      Class in Wentworth/Prisoner

●      Prison industrial complex in Wentworth/Prisoner

●      Race and ethnicity in Wentworth/Prisoner

●      Diversity behind bars

●      Nation in Wentworth/Prisoner

●      Violence in Wentworth/Prisoner

●      Substance abuse in Wentworth/Prisoner

●      Mental health and mental illness in Wentworth/Prisoner

●      Aesthetics of Wentworth/Prisoner

●      Serial narrative and Wentworth/Prisoner

●      Performance in Wentworth/Prisoner

●      Wentworth as reboot or remake of Prisoner

●      Television genre and the prison drama

●      Prestige TV and prison dramas 

●      Reception of Wentworth/Prisoner

●      Wentworth/Prisoner fans, fan practices and fandoms

●      Distribution of Wentworth/Prisoner

●      Creative practice in the development and production of Wentworth/Prisoner

●      Industrial practice in the development and production of Wentworth/Prisoner

●      Wentworth/Prisoner and transnational TV and format trade

●      Activism, Social Change and Wentworth/Prisoner

●      Music and lyrics in Wentworth/Prisoner

Transmedia Literacy International Conference, 22-24 March 2018, Universitat Pompeu Fabra – Barcelona, Spain

July 21, 2017

Join us on March 22-24, 2018, for the Transmedia Literacy International Conference. This event brings together a vibrant and global community of media and education researchers and innovators. The conference is organized as a part of the dissemination activities of the TRANSLITERACY H2020 action, a project that involves researchers from Europe, Latin America and Australia. Beyond the paper sessions and the keynotes the Transmedia Literacy International Conference will include workshops and short presentations by education innovation leaders. The main objective of the conference is to share research outputs and practices around the following topics:

Transmedia literacy
Transmedia education
Transmedia skills and informal learning strategies
Media literacy
Educommunication
Student-generated contents
Collaborative cultures and education
Fan cultures and education

Transmedia Literacy International Conference will be held at the Universitat Pompeu Fabra – Barcelona, and will feature a series of workshops for teachers as well as two days of paper sessions and a special event around Transmedia Literacy. We hope you can join us!

This event has received funding from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement No 645238

Deadlines:
Proposals submission: October 31, 2017
Notifications: December 15, 2017

Registration:
With accepted proposals: from December 15 to February 15, 2017
Other participants: from February 16, 2017
Keynote speakers:
David Buckingham – University of Loughborough (United Kingdom)
Divina Frau-Meigs – Université Sorbonne Nouvelle (France)
Alejandro Piscitelli – Universidad de Buenos Aires (Argentina)
Other keynote speakers will be confirmed as soon as possible.
PROPOSALS

The Transmedia Literacy Conference will accept the following formats:

Research Papers: participants must send research papers (extension: 6,000 -8,000 words) before October 31, 2017. The Transmedia Literacy International Conference will accept proposals tailored to the diverse forms of research in the field of transmedia literacy, transmedia education, transmedia skills and informal learning strategies, media literacy, educommunication, student-generated contents, collaborative cultures and education, and fan cultures and education.
Paper parallel sessions will be held on March 22 (afternoon) and March 23 (morning & afternoon).
If you are interested in presenting a Research Paper, please fill and submit a proposal in English (download the Paper Guidelines) to the following email: transliteracyconference@upf.edu, clearly indicating that is a Research Paper proposal in the subject. Please send a MS Word file (.doc, or .docx); do not send PDF documents.
Deadline: October 31, 2017.
Innovative Educational Practices: participants must send before October 31, 2017 an extended abstract (extension: 1,200-1,500 words) describing a real educational experience in primary/secondary schools involving transmedia storytelling, collaborative practices in social media, student-generated contents o any other educommunicational activity.
Innovative educational practices sessions will be held on March 22 (afternoon) and March 23 (morning & afternoon).
If you are interested in presenting an Innovative Educational Practice, please fill and submit a proposal in English (download the specific guidelines here) to the following email: transliteracyconference@upf.edu, clearly indicating that is an Innovative Educational Practice proposal in the subject. Please send a MS Word file (.doc, or .docx); do not send PDF documents.
Deadline: October 31, 2017.
Workshops: the Transmedia Literacy International Conference will accept a short number of workshops oriented to high-school teachers/professors. The workshops should be designed for short groups (no more than 20 people) and the duration should be 4 hours (240 minutes including a break); they could explore different uses and experiences around transmedia storytelling and collaborative cultures in the classroom.
Workshops will be held on March 23 (morning & afternoon) and, eventually, on March 24 (morning).
Workshops can be in English, Spanish or Catalan (Los talleres pueden ser en inglés, castellano o catalán / Els tallers poden ser en anglès, castellà o català).
English: If you are interested in organizing a Workshop, please fill the following Workshop proposal (extension: 1,500-2,000 words) (download the specific guidelines here) and submit it to: transliteracyconference@upf.edu, clearly indicating that is a Workshop proposal in the subject. Please send a MS Word file (.doc, or .docx); do not send PDF documents.
Castellano: Si estás interesado en organizar un Taller, por favor completa la siguiente propuesta (descargar la guía) (extensión: 1.500-2.000 palabras) y envíala a: transliteracyconference@upf.edu, indicando claramente que es una propuesta de Taller. Por favor, envía un archivo MS Word (.doc o .docx); no envíes documentos PDF.
Catalán: Si estàs interessat a organitzar un Taller, per favor completa la següent proposta (descarregar la guia) (extensió: 1.500-2.000 paraules) i envia-la a: transliteracyconference@upf.edu, indicant clarament que és una proposta de Taller. Per favor, envia un arxiu MS Word (.doc o .docx); no enviïs documents PDF.
Deadline: October 31, 2017.
PROGRAM OF THE CONFERENCE (work in progress)

Thursday, March 22, 2018

09.00 – 13.00 Registration
10.00 – 13.00 Special opening event (live and streaming)
13.00 – 14.30 Lunch
14.30 – 15.30 Keynote conference
15.30 – 16.00 Coffee Break
16.00 – 18.00 Paper / Innovative Educational Practices Sessions
Friday, March 23, 2017

09.00 – 13.00 Registration
09.30 – 10.30 Keynote conference
10.30 – 11.00 Coffee Break
11.00 – 13.00 Paper / Innovative Educational Practices Sessions
13.00 – 14.30 Lunch
14.30 – 15.30 Keynote conference
15.30 – 16.00 Coffee Break
16.00 – 18.00 Paper / Innovative Educational Practices Sessions / Workshops
Saturday, March 24, 2017

10.00 – 14.00 Workshops
10.30 – 11.00 Coffee Break
11.00 – 12.30 Teacher’s Kit presentation

Important details

This conference is supported by the TRANSLITERACY Project / H2020 Research and Innovation Programme under Grant Agreement No. 645238. The registration is free and includes coffee breaks.
Participants with accepted papers, innovative experiences or workshops will have priority for registration. The registration will then be opened to other participants.
All conference rooms will be equipped with standard Wi-Fi broadband service, PC, Power Point / Adobe PDF software, AV projection, sound, and VGA adapters. We will not provide additional bandwidth capacity or provide other special equipment.

COMMITTEES

Scientific Committee

Carlos A. Scolari – Universitat Pompeu Fabra (Spain)
Elisenda Ardévol –Universitat Oberta de Catalunya (Spain)
Rosalía Winocur – Universidad de la República (Uruguay)
Gladys Ceretta – Universidad de la República (Uruguay)
Sara Pereira – Universidade do Minho (Portugal)
Raine Koskimaa – University of Jyväskylä (Finland)
Rebecca Enyon – Oxford Internet Institute (United Kingdom)
Simona Tirocchi – Università degli Studi di Torino (Italy)
Carlos Barreneche – Pontificia Universidad Javeriana (Colombia)
Gabriella Taddeo – Istituto Nazionale Documentazione Innovazione Ricerca Educativa (Italy)
Heather Horst – University of Sidney (Australia)
Sarah Pink – RMIT University (Australia)
Organization Committee

Carlos A. Scolari – Universitat Pompeu Fabra
Maria-Jose Masanet – Universitat Pompeu Fabra
Mar Guerrero-Pico – Universitat Pompeu Fabra
María-José Establés – Universitat Pompeu Fabra
Elisenda Ardèvol – Universitat Oberta de Catalunya
Israel Márquez – Universitat Oberta de Catalunya
Débora Lanzeni – Universitat Oberta de Catalunya
Arnau Gifreu – Universitat de Vic
Ruth Contreras – Universitat de Vic

The conference

FSN 2017 Louisa Stein ‘Fandom/Resistance’ Keynote: audio recording

July 18, 2017

Dear all,

Thanks to Finn Upham we are very happy to be able to provide an audio recording of Louisa Stein‘s ‘Fandom/Resistance’ keynote which was delivered at the Fan Studies Network 2017 conference. Finn was kind enough to record the keynote so that we could share with those of you that could not attend, and those who were there but may wish to listen to it again. This talk resulted in a lot of emotion in the room, so we are very happy that more of you can experience this striking and wonderful keynote.

You can also download the file.

Timestamps and links for the vids included are as follows:

11:18 – 11:30 Crazy by l_e_s
13:09 – 13:36 Light It Up – A Sailor Moon AMV by The Optional Studios
15:08 – 15:25 Light It Up (Women’s March Vid) by lolawaldorf
27:00 – 27:20 Carrie and Gary – A Better Son Daughter by eruthros2
33:12 Questions (Audience voices cut for audibility.)

The programme for FSN2017, which took place at the University of Huddersfield 24-25 June 2017,  is also available for download here.

CFP: Gender and Horror

July 12, 2017

Following our previous call inviting chapter submissions for a new edited collection focusing on gender and horror, we have had such a large number of submissions that we are now aiming to publish three volumes. The first two will focus on films and on television but the third volume will cover other forms of media such as comics and graphic novels, fan literature, video games, and crossover media forms.

We would like to extend the call for papers in relation to the third volume only and will welcome 200 word abstracts plus a short personal bio. The deadline for this will be 19 July 2017.

​Responses to this call should be sent to Professor Robert Shail r.shail@leedsbeckett.ac.uk.

 

​The original cfp is below for your information.
This edited collection aims to re-examine horror in an era of remakes, reboots and re-imaginings. There have been many developments in the horror genre and whilst much of it has been reliant on previous material, there are also many shifts and changes such as
* cross-over of genres (for example, teen romance paired with vampires and werewolves, or horror in space);
* new formats such as Netflix, and cinema no longer being the only place we see horror;
* a resurgence of stories of hauntings and ghosts;
* and the popularity of ‘found footage’.

We wish to focus specifically on horror from 1995 to the present, as after a brief hiatus in the mainstream, the 1990s saw the return of horror to our screens – including our TV screens with, for example, Buffy The Vampire Slayer – and with horror and its characters more knowing than before.
We are happy for you to compare older material with newer versions, such as the recent Netflix version of The Exorcist (2016) with the original film The Exorcist (1973). The main requirement is that you interrogate whether the portrayal of gender has changed in horror – it may look like something different (more positive?) is happening, but is it?

We hope to encourage diverse perspectives and we welcome early career researchers and new voices to offer a different light on classic material, in sole- or multi-authored chapters.
We’d also like to gently remind potential authors that ‘gender’ doesn’t only apply to women, it applies to men and masculinities, and it encompasses non-binary identities and experiences, as well as issues about ‘race’, ethnicities and class. ​
The schedule is as follows:
* You send your chapter title, 200 word abstract and brief bio by the end of May 2017.
* The finalised proposal will be sent to the publisher Emerald in early summer.
* Your final first draft chapter (approx 7000 words) should be sent to us by January 31st2018 (reminder/s will be sent).
* We will return any comments/revisions by the end of March 2018,
* and ask that you send us the final revised chapter by the end of June 2018.
* The completed manuscript will be submitted in July 2018 for publication in early 2019.

Please send your chapter titles, 200 word abstracts and a brief bio to the book editors by the end of May.
If you have any queries, or would like to contribute but need to tweak the schedule, please email us.

Editors:
Dr Samantha Holland s.holland@leedsbeckett.ac.uk
Dr Steven Gerrard S.D.Gerrard@leedsbeckett.ac.uk
Prof Robert Shail R.Shail@leedsbeckett.ac.uk

If you are not familiar with the publisher, Emerald are an independent publisher, established by academics in 1967 and committed to retaining their independence.
And for your future reference: All hardback monograph publishing will be available in paperback after 24 months, and all books are available as ebooks. Emerald commission and cover the cost of indexing if authors don’t want to do it themselves; use professional designers for each individual book jacket; and aim to exceed the royalties of other publishers. They have international offices, but pride themselves on not being a ‘corporate machine’.

In Praise: Fandom Zine now accepting submissions

July 12, 2017

 

CFP: The Second Annual Ann Radcliffe Academic Conference at StokerCon 2018

July 12, 2017

Call for Presentations:

The Second Annual Ann Radcliffe Academic Conference at StokerCon 2018
Abstract Submission Deadline: November 27, 2017

The Second Annual Ann Radcliffe Academic Conference at StokerCon 2018
Conference Dates: March 1 – 4, 2018
Conference Hotel: Biltmore Hotel, Providence, Rhode Island
Conference Website: http://stokercon2018.org/

The Ann Radcliffe Academic Conference co-chairs invite all interested scholars and academics to submit presentation abstracts related to horror studies for consideration to be presented at the Third Annual StokerCon, March 1 – 4, 2018 held at the historic Biltmore Hotel in Providence, Rhode Island (see: http://www.providencebiltmore.com/ ).

The inaugural Ann Radcliffe Academic Conference in 2017 was a tremendous success and saw many presentations covering various aspects of horror studies. It is the goal with the second conference to continue the dialogue of academic analysis of horror. Hence we are looking for completed research or work-in-progress projects that can be presented to with the intent to expand the scholarship on various facets of horror that proliferates in:

• Art
• Cinema
• Comics
• Literature
• Music
• Poetry
• Television
• Video Games
• Etc.

We invite papers that take an interdisciplinary approach to their subject matter and can apply a variety of lenses and frameworks, such as, but not limited to:

• Auteur theory
• Close textual analysis
• Comparative analysis
• Cultural and ethnic
• Fandom and fan studies
• Film studies
• Folklore
• Gender/LGBT studies
• Historic analysis
• Interpretations
• Linguistic
• Literature studies
• Media and communications
• Media Sociology
• Modernity/Postmodernity
• Mythological
• Psychological
• Racial studies
• Semiotics
• Theoretical (Adorno, Barthes, Baudrillard, Dyer, Gerbner, etc.)
• Transmedia

Conference Details

• Please send a 250 – 300 word abstract on your intended topic, a preliminary bibliography and your CV to AnnRadCon@gmail.com by November 27, 2017. Responses will be emailed out during the last week of November/first week of December, 2017.
• Presentation time consideration: 15 minute maximum to allow for a Question and Answer period. Limit of one presentation at the conference.
• There are no honorariums for presenters; this is an academic conference. There is, however, a StokerCon2018 award opportunity; see http://horrorscholarships.com/the-scholarship-from-hell/
• The co-chairs of the Ann Radcliffe Academic Conference are exploring the possibilities of editing and publishing a volume of conference presentations (along with selections from the inaugural conference). Presenters will have the opportunity to edit and expand their presentations into proper chapters if they are selected for the volume.

Organizing Co-Chairs

Michele Brittany & Nicholas Diak
Email: AnnRadCon@gmail.com

 

The Ann Radcliffe Academic Conference is part of the Horror Writers Association’s Outreach Program. Membership to the Horror Writers Association is not required to submit or present, however registration to StokerCon 2018 is required to present. StokerCon registration can be obtained by going to http://www.stokercon2018.org. There is no additional registration or fees for the Ann Radcliffe Academic Conference outside StokerCon registration. If interested in applying to the Horror Writer’s Association as an academic member, please see http://www.horror.org/about/ .

StokerCon is the annual convention hosted by the Horror Writers Association wherein the Bram Stoker Awards for superior achievement in horror writing are awarded.

CFP: STAR WARS, Expanded Universe, legend, canon? « I thought he was a myth! »

May 29, 2017

STAR WARS, Expanded Universe, legend, canon? « I thought he was a myth! »

Edited by Marc Joly-Corcoran (University of Montreal) and Laurent Jullier (New Sorbonne University)

Theme

Since Disney bought Lucasfilm in 2012, the Star Wars universe has never been so disrupted. George Lucas is no longer involved as a producer, for better or worse. In 2014, in what seems to be a marketing move that mainly serves to distinguish what would be now officially “canon”, the status of the Expanded Universe (the EU: novels, video games, comic books) was classified “legend”. Consequently, apart from the fan productions, and all the fanon, SW post-2014 stories are officially “canons”.

That being said, one can only speculate about the impact of this diegetic change for the fans and the future Lucasfilm productions. Indeed, the EU is becoming a fabulous paradigm from which new creators are free to draw any ideas they feel necessary, without any constraint nor pressure to use ‘this or that’ to respect a pre-established continuity set in the EU, which is no more canon. Nevertheless, many fans have invested a significant amount of time reading all the novels and comics, covering 20,000 years of history in “a galaxy far far away”. Now, we could push this ‘legend logic’ further: why could the infamous prequels, directed by George Lucas, not be classified “legend” too, intradiegetically acknowledged by the characters in SW? The same could apply for the original trilogy. Isn’t it Rey who says about Luke Skywalker: “I thought he was a myth!”

Exclusively devoted to Star Wars, this issue aims to analyze the impacts of the upheavals following this diegetic change:    

– On the official productions (two feature films, The Force Awakens and Rogue One, the animated Star Wars Rebels series, books, video games, etc.)

– On the fan creations: what impact these films had on their audiovisual works (fanfilm), fanart or fanfic, which they continue to produce since their release?

– On the reception side: how were the last two feature films received and appreciated according to the audience? – connoisseurs, fans of the original trilogy, newcomers, beginners, etc. How are the six original opus of the saga now “revised”? What consequences changing the status of the EU to “legend” really had on their “image” or “value”?

This issue seeks well-researched papers that address topics such as (but not exclusively):

  • Amnesia in SW screenplays and retroactive continuity
  • Revival, remake, reboot, soft reboot: why the fad?
  • Transmedia as a way for saving screenplays, and retcon
  • The relevance of the notions of legitimacy, “canon” or “non-canon”, “officiality” and authenticity in a fictional universe
  • Revisionism through the history of reception, specifically concerning Episode IV released in 1977
  • Case studies: The Force Unleashed, KOTOR
  • Case studies: Rogue One, marketing, trailers and reshoot
  • Should The Force Awakens be called New Hope 2.0?
  • Fans’ contributions to the Expanded Universe (Fan theories, fanfilm, fanfic, fanart, etc.)

How to submit?

Please send an abstract, between 300 and 500 words (excluding references), in English or French, by August 1st, 2017, to    marc.joly@umontreal.ca  AND laurent.jullier@sorbonne-nouvelle.fr

The abstract must specify the topic and the object(s) of study, along with the preferred methodology.  Don’t forget to indicate key bibliographical references, your name, email address, and your institutional affiliation.

Selected contributors will be advised by email by the end of June 2017. Full papers will be submitted by the end of september 2017 (anonymized). The issue will be released during the beginning of 2018.

Editorial rules

Kinephanos is a peer-reviewed journal. Each article is evaluated by double-blind peer review. Kinephanos does not retain exclusive rights of published texts. However, material submitted must not have been previously published elsewhere. Future versions of the texts published in other periodicals must reference Kinephanos as its original source.

For the editorial guidelines, refer to the section Editorial Guidelines.

http://www.kinephanos.ca/2017/star-wars-univers-etendu-legende-canon-i-thought-he-was-a-myth-star-wars-expanded-universe-legend-canon/

Kinephanos accepts papers in English and in French.

CFP: Breaking out of the Box: Critical Essays on the Cult TV Show Supernatural

May 29, 2017

Lisa Macklem and Dominick Grace seek proposals for a refereed collection of essays on the CW cult horror show Supernatural.

“What’s in the box?” Dean Winchester asks in “The Magnificent Seven,” episode one of the third season of Supernatural, to the befuddlement of his brother Sam and their avuncular mentor Bobby Singer, but to the delight of fans who revel in the show’s wry meta elements. Dean is of course quoting Detective Mills, Brad Pitt’s character in the thriller Se7en (1995), directed by David Fincher. Throughout its twelve-year run (to date), Supernatural has revelled in breaking out of the limitations usually implied by a television show, breaking out of the box in numerous ways. Acknowledging the popularity of the meta-play in the show, current showrunner Andrew Dabb promised the most meta-finale ever for the season twelve finale. One of the most noteworthy examples of this predilection is the extensively meta elements of the season five apocalypse plotline, which featured the character Carver Edlund (his name derived from series writers Jeremy Carver and Ben Edlund) in several episodes. Edlund is a novelist who has written supposed works of fiction that in fact document Sam and Dean Winchester’s lives, thoroughly breaking the fourth wall. Edlund is the pseudonym of Chuck Shurley—who turns out to be God, making one of his rare mainstream television appearances. However, this meta plot element represents only one of the myriad ways Supernatural has broken out of the box. Season five, episode eight (“Changing Channels”), transports Sam and Dean into the worlds of several television shows, while season six, episode fifteen, “The French Mistake,” carried the conceit further, having Sam and Dean visit the “real” world, in which they are characters in the TV show Supernatural. Season eight and nine feature as main villain the appropriately-named Metatron, the scribe of God trying to write himself into the position of God—in effect plotting in both senses of the word. Season eight also featured, in episode 8 (“Hunteri Heroici”), Warner Brothers style cartoon gimmickry, and the upcoming season thirteen promises an animated crossover episode with Scooby Doo. Season ten’s 200th episode is yet another recursive metanarrative, featuring a highschool student trying to mount a musical adaptation of the Carver Edlund novels. In short, despite its horror trappings, Supernatural has been decidedly postmodern in its liberal use of pastiche, meta, intertextuality, and generic slippage. This collection is interested in exploring the ways Supernatural breaks boundaries. Topics of potential interest include but are not limited to

 

  • Explicitly meta elements in Supernatural
  • Supernatural and fandom: interpenetrations
  • God, Metatron, and other Supernatural authors
  • Role and role-playing
  • Generic slippage (comedy; found footage; the musical episode)
  • Allusion and intertext in Supernatural
  • Canonicity
  • Non-Supernatural (e.g. the episodes with no fantasy elements)
  • Supernatural and genre TV
  • reality and retcon: how the show has shifted and redefined its own rules
  • casting and self-consciousness (e.g. the use of celebrity guest stars such as Linda Blair, Rick Springfield, etc.)
  • Importance of music throughout the show

 

Proposals of 300-500 words should be submitted to Lisa Macklem (lmacklem1@gmail.com) or Dominick Grace (dgrace2@uwo.ca) by October 1 2017. Final papers should be between 5,000 and 7,000 words long and written in conformity with MLA style and will be due by May 1 2018. McFarland has expressed interest in this collection, with a contract forthcoming.

Call for Papers – Otherness: Essays and Studies 6.1

May 29, 2017

The peer-reviewed, open-access e-journal Otherness: Essays and Studies is now accepting submissions for its special issue: Otherness and Transgression in Fan and Celebrity Studies, Autumn 2017.

Otherness: Essays and Studies publishes research articles from and across different scholarly disciplines that critically examine the concepts of otherness and alterity. We particularly appreciate dynamic cross-disciplinary study.

The notions of otherness and transgression play an essential part in the cultural work and practices celebrities and fandoms perform inasmuch as these concepts are inseparable from the celebrity and fan cultural processes of social in/exclusion, identification and dissociation, uniformity and diversification, and forces both drawing and disrupting demarcations between normalcy and deviance. Otherness and transgression constitute pertinent sites for critical exploration within the two overlapping fields of research, Fan and Celebrity Studies.

A complex and multivalent term, otherness is conventionally signaled by markers of “difference” and the unknown. As difference remains a condition for any determinate sense of identity, otherness is also inevitably implicit and complicit in considerations of subjectivity, identity, and sameness. Likewise, in the field of Fan and Celebrity culture – where categories such as class, gender, race, sexuality, and age dynamically intersect and interact in manifold ways – the identity work, social meanings, and cultural preferences informing both these cultures’ production and consumption of cultural and media texts are also constantly negotiated. Reflexive of the values, biases, and tensions of the social body, they are useful indicators of contemporary configurations and devices for othering; for example, the ways in which the discourses of immorality, pathology, monstrosity, impropriety, and cultism, among others, inform the construction of difference, and function as vehicles for othering that additionally cut diagonally across various imbricating “-isms,” such as racism, heterosexism, ageism, ableism, and lookism.

As difference often implies the perception of deviance, otherness is accompanied by the constant impending threat of transgression, to undo and redraw the differentiating limits determining the provisional identities of entities, behaviors, and bodies. While transgression refers to a violation and exceeding of bounds, it also ambiguously realizes and completes these boundaries as it helps define them and reaffirms a given social order by designating the illicit. This dialectic of the de/stabilizing effects of transgression summons further inquiry in relation to fandoms and celebrity cultures.

Fan and Celebrity Studies are in need of a reappraisal in which the new fickle and permeable boundaries between identities, cultural practices, private and public spheres, products and consumers, celebrity and fan bodies, intimacy and estrangement are investigated. Refracting otherness and transgression from overlapping prisms, the pleasures, representations, productions, and affects of celebrity and fan cultures opens up a fruitful and invigorating space for further research. We envision this special issue on Otherness and Transgression in Fan and Celebrity Studies to be one such place.

 

WELCOME TOPICS INCLUDE BUT ARE NOT LIMITED TO THE FOLLOWING:

The Intersection of Celebrity and Fan Studies

Sex, Gender, Sexual Differing, and Queering the Fan / Celebrity Body

Cross-Over Celebrities; Ethnicity, Hybridity, and Fandom in Transcultural Contexts

Celebrity Representations of Dis/ability and through Fan Works

The Intersectionalities of Social Categories in Celebrity and Fan Cultures

Notoriety, Infamy, Scandal, Deviance, and Excess Social Media and the Construction of Celebrity as Other

The Construction of Otherness in Fandom and Fan Works

Monstrosity, the Abject, and Uncanny in Fan Fiction, Fandoms, and Celebrityhood

Pathology, Addiction, Cultism, Confession, and Therapy

Mashing and Vidding: Viral and Violating

Authenticity, Secrecy, Intimacy, and Publicity

Post-feminist Celebrity Narratives and Cultural Forms

Power, Prosumerism, and Participatory Culture

New Modes of Self-Other Relations within Para-social Contexts

Fan and/or Celebrity Shaming

The (Im)Material Other Worlds of Fandoms and the Alternative Spaces of Fan Communities

 

Articles should be between 5,000 – 8,000 words. All electronic submissions should be sent via email with Word document attachment formatted to Chicago Manual of Style standards to the issue editor Dr. Matthias Stephan at otherness.research@gmail.com

 

Further information: http://www.otherness.dk/journal/

 

The deadline for submissions is Monday, September 15, 2017.