Posts Tagged ‘Symposium’

Report: La Culture du Fan Symposium, Paris-Sorbonne University

April 30, 2012

NB: As the morning session was conducted in French – and my own grasp of the language is poor, at best – this report will cover just the English afternoon session. However, those of you more cultured than I may find the Storify live tweet report of the event useful, as the #CultFan hashtag was used throughout the day. A special mention must also go to Sebastien Francois, who provided English commentary on the French content.

Organised in association with the Maison des Sciences and held at Paris-Sorbonne University on 27th April 2012, the Culture du Fan Symposium brought together European scholars of fandom in a bilingual event that featured papers both focused on specific case studies, and asking larger questions about the state of the field. (more…)

2012 AX Anime and Manga Studies Symposium

April 4, 2012

2012 AX Anime and Manga Studies Symposium
Los Angeles, CA: June 29 – July 2, 2012

Anime and manga are visual culture and media, popular entertainment,
commercial products, objects of interest and sometimes obsession – and
for many people, their first and sometimes only contact with Japan.
Scholars in Japan and around the world have increasingly become
interested in the themes, topics, and issues of anime and manga – and
of all Japanese popular culture.

The goal of the AX Anime and Manga Studies Symposium is to highlight
cutting-edge research and critical thinking about Japanese animation
and comics by examining emerging trends in anime and manga studies
around the world. Anime Expo is the largest gathering of fans of
Japanese popular culture in the U.S., and, as an integral component of
the AX program, the Symposium will also serve to introduce anime and
manga studies to a general, non-academic audience. Another goal of
this event will be to to establish crucial connections and facilitate
briding the gaps between scholars and fans.

Speakers are invited to present papers on any topic related to
Japanese comics and animation, global anime and manga fandom, and the
anime/manga industry in Japan and elsewhere. Individual presentations
can focus on themes and topics such as:

– Close readings of particular individual anime and manga texts.
– Uses of anime and manga to present viewpoints on Japanese and world history.
– Japanese animation and comics in historical perspective: anime and
manga before Tezuka.
– Anime and manga as a corpus: Sequels, remakes, reinterpretations,
reimaginings.
– Global conversations with Japanese popular culture – Non-Japanese
uses of anime and manga, e.g., Animatrix, Batman, First Squad, Iron
Man, Supernatural, etc.
– The role of the creator and director (and individual
creators/directors) in the development of anime and manga.
– Cultural production approaches to Japanese visual culture: Examining
production, promotion, marketing, international licensing and
distribution, translation and sales to understand anime’s global
impact.
– The activities of anime/manga fans – for example, fanfiction,
cosplay, anime music videos, and website development. Other ideas are
also welcome.
– Anime and manga adaptations and adaptations of anime and manga:
Failures and successes.
– Beyond mainstream anime and manga: Experimental and non-mainstream
Japanese animation and comics.
– Anime and manga in the classroom: Theories and experiences of
teaching Japanese visual culture.
– Popular culture responds to reality: The Great Eastern Japan
Earthquake and future directions in Japanese visual culture.

The symposium particularly welcomes studies of recent and new anime
and manga (such as Durarara, Eden of the East, Madoka, Red Line) and
papers that engage with recent Japanese and Western scholarship on
these and other related topics.

This list is not exhaustive, and other topics and approaches will be
welcome as well.

To respond, please forward the title of your paper, an abstract of
300-500 words, and your CV to the attention of Mikhail Koulikov, at
mkoulikov@gmail.com.

All submissions will undergo peer review.

The Symposium program will also feature several roundtable panel
discussions bringing together scholars from different institutions to
share different perspectives on anime and manga.

Roundtable panel 1: Anime and manga studies at 30: Issues and directions.
Roundtable panel 2: Fan cultures and practices in Japan, America, and beyond.
Roundtable panel 3: The future of Japanese visual culture.

If you are interested in participating in any of these discussions,
please contact Mikhail Koulikov, at mkoulikov@gmail.com, with a
summary of your experience and background plus a 300-500 word
statement of your interest and specific approaches to your topic

The deadline for all paper and panel proposals is May 15, 2012.

All speakers will receive complimentary admission to Anime Expo 2012.
Some reimbursement of travel expenses may be available.

Contemporary Japanese Media Cultures: Industry, Society and Audiences

March 15, 2012

Symposium: 5th September 2012.
This one-day Symposium on Japanese popular media investigates the significance of contemporary Japanese media to the wider industries and cultures that they serve. Although access to Japanese media cultures has never been better for those living outside Japan, there remains a dearth of analytical engagement with how the Japanese media industries function, and only patchy coverage exists of the media texts produced within Japan.  Therefore, this Symposium seeks to unpack some of the complexities within the Japanese media landscape, by considering how differing media industries work in collaboration as well as in competition with one another. In doings so, the aim is to bring together speakers utilising a wide range of approaches and specialist knowledge to discuss the interconnectivity of Japan’s media industries, visible in phenomena such as cross-media adaptations, franchising practices, remakes of texts and international distribution. We also aim to complicate the notion of Japanese media industries as “national” by investigating the regional, transnational and global reach of their texts.
We seek papers examining how Japanese media, including (but not limited to) manga, anime, video games, television, magazine publishing and film operate within and beyond Japanese borders.  The aim is to bring together experts able to discuss how Japanese media products get made, and why, who gets to see them (legally or otherwise) and what it is that academic explorations of Japan’s media might be able to offer the industries and cultures they study.
Topics might include (but are in no way limited to):
•    Japanese media franchising
•    National, regional, transnational and/or global distribution of Japanese media
•    Japanese media industries
•    Cross-media adaptation
•    Transmedia storytelling
•    Media production techniques and systems
•    Cross-media genres
•    New media texts
•    Ancillary industries (e.g. Japanese special effects houses, animation outsourcing, voice acting, stars and their agents)
•    Translation of media from Japanese to other languages
•    Invisible media (e.g. texts or genres popular in Japan, but not often exported or studied)
•    Popular cross-media franchises (e.g. Naruto, Bleach, One Piece, Atom Boy, Bayside Shakedown)
•    Reception of Japanese media texts
•    Audiences, fans and subcultures

Symposium to be held in Norwich, in conjunction with the University of East Anglia, the British Association of Japanese Studies and the Arts and Humanities Research Council

Papers proposals of no more than 300 words should be sent to mangamoviessymposium@gmail.com by, Monday 30th April 2012. If you would like more information, please contact r.denison@uea.ac.uk.

CFP: Screen Narratives Conference

March 4, 2012

Call for papers:

Contemporary Screen Narratives: Storytelling’s Digital and Industrial Contexts

Conference to be held on 17 May 2012

Hosted by the Department of Culture, Film and Media, University of Nottingham

Keynote speakers: Henry Jenkins and Jason Mittell

This one-day conference looks to trace connections between the narratives of contemporary screen media and their contexts of production, distribution and consumption. We refer here to narrative as the presentation and organisation of story via the semiotic phenomena of image, sound and written/spoken word. We anticipate that speakers will explore ways in which stories and their on-screen telling are informed by contemporary industrial and technological conditions. We invite contributions from postgraduate and early-career researchers working across screen-based narrative media, such as film, television, comics, literature, video games and other areas of new media. We are interested to receive all paper proposals pertinent to the conference topic, though we particularly welcome those that engage with the following themes and questions:

Industrial determinants. In what ways are stories and their telling contingent on the production cultures, distribution methods, revenue models and governmental policies that configure a given creative industry?

Digital Technologies. How has the construction and/or reception of narratives been influenced by digital production equipment, distribution tech, online platforms and consumer hardware devices?

Seriality and Transmedia: In what ways do serial narrative forms, whether disseminated within a given medium or across multiple media, reflect industrial and technological contexts?

Audio and Visual Styles: How are the sounds and visions of contemporary screen narratives informed by conditions of production and reception technologies?

Paratextual Surround: In what ways do promotional materials, practitioner discourses, fan cultures and critical/journalistic responses discursively frame screen narratives?

Send abstracts of 250 words to both:

Anthony Smith – aaxas4@nottingham.ac.uk

and

Aaron Calbreath-Frasieur – aaxac2@nottingham.ac.uk

Papers should not exceed twenty minutes in length.
The deadline for proposal submission is 4 March 2012.

For updates, see: http://contemporaryscreennarratives.tumblr.com

Popular Media Cultures: Writing in the Margins and Reading Between the Lines

March 3, 2012

REGISTRATION NOW OPEN FOR:

Popular Media Cultures: Writing in the Margins and Reading Between the Lines

A One Day Symposium to be held at the Odeon Cinema, Covent Garden, London

Saturday 19th May 2012

Keynote Address by:

Prof. Henry Jenkins, University of Southern California

Popular Media Cultures seeks to explore the relationship between audiences and media texts, their paratexts and interconnected ephemera, and the related cultural practices that add to and expand the narrative worlds with which fans engage. How audiences make meaning out of established media texts will be discussed in connection with the new texts produced by fans. The symposium will focus on the cultural work done by media audiences, how they engage with new technologies and how convergence culture impacts on the strategies and activities of popular media fans.

With papers by: Stacey Abbott, Joanne Garde-Hansen & Kristyn Gorton, Matt Hills, Mark Jancovich, Roberta E. Pearson and Cornel Sandvoss.

Fees (including lunch and refreshments)*:
£50 Full rate
£25 Student reduced rate
*Delegates on the day will receive a 10% discount on purchases made at the Forbidden Planet Megastore on presentation of their symposium name badge.

For further details of how to register and attend the event go to the our website at: http://popularmediacultures.port.ac.uk/

The Symposium is supported by the Centre for Cultural and Creative Research at the University of Portsmouth. See: http://www.port.ac.uk/research/cccr/