Posts Tagged ‘CFP’

CFP: Transmedia Earth Conference 

January 31, 2017

TRANSMEDIA EARTH CONFERENCE: 

GLOBAL CONVERGENCE CULTURES

Hosted by EAFIT University, Medellín, Colombia

In Association with Bath Spa University, UK,

Bournemouth University, UK &
University of Vic – Central University of Catalonia, Spain

3-Day International Conference: 11th – 13th October 2017

http://the-transmedia-earth-conference.webflow.io

Confirmed Speakers:
Carlos A. Scolari, Universitat Pompeu Fabra

Dan Hassler-Forest, Utrecht University
Matthew Freeman, Bath Spa University

William Proctor, Bournemouth University

In an age where the distribution and sharing of content across multiple platforms is increasingly accessible – and the attention span of audiences even more divided as a result – transmediality has become a key strategy for engaging audiences across media.
Much has been written about the role of transmediality in a Hollywood context, with scholars defining forms of transmedia intertextuality (Kinder 1991), transmedia storytelling (Jenkins 2006; Evans 2011) and transmedia storyworlds (Scolari 2009; Wolf 2012),
with others exploring the related roles of transmedia fans (Hills 2015; Booth 2016) and models of transmedia brand advertising (Tenderich 2015; Freeman 2016). And yet different countries, cultures and peoples around the globe are now beginning to define increasing
uses for transmediality, adapting this phenomenon in unique ways to different cultures, communities, businesses and industries – be it in sectors of film, television, publishing, journalism, leisure, radio and beyond, emerging in cultural arenas as diverse
as creative writing, museums, apps, virtual reality, activism and education.

With this in mind, the Transmedia Earth Conference aims to internationalise both the study and the practice of transmediality by providing a global platform for showcasing and
exploring the many manifestations of contemporary and historical transmediality around the world. The conference benefits from a network of international partner institutions, and is a collaboration between the Media
Convergence Research Centre
 at Bath Spa University, the Department of Social Communication at EAFIT University, the Centre
for the Study of Journalism, Culture and Community
 at Bournemouth University, and the Konekto
Research Group
 at the University of Vic – Central University of Catalonia.
The inaugural conference – hosted by EAFIT University in Colombia – seeks to map emerging understandings of transmediality and global convergence cultures. We are interested in hearing from both scholars and practitioners about research that examines emerging
contexts and meanings of transmediality as well as from interested parties about cutting-edge social and technological shifts related to media convergences. We invite proposals for formal presentations and performative, digital or video based works. Proposal
topics may address, but are not limited to:

  • Transmedia storytelling and writing
  • Transmedia branding and marketing
  • Transmedia distribution and activism
  • Transmedia apps and online games
  • Transmedia web series and mobile devices
  • Transmedia audiences and fandom
  • Transmedia politics and education
  • Transmedia heritage and leisure spaces
  • Transmedia documentary and non-fiction
  • Transmediality as a transnational phenomenon

Please send proposals (300 words) along with a short biography to the conference coordinators: Matthew Freeman (m.freeman@bathspa.ac.uk), William Proctor (bproctor@bournemouth.ac.uk),
Mauricio Vásquez (mvasqu23@eafit.edu.co) and Camilo Andrés Tamayo Gómez (ctamay12@eafit.edu.co) by no later than 31 March 2017.

We are also hosting an ‘Adaptive Storyworld Challenge‘ in partnership with Conducttr, the world’s favourite transmedia storytelling engine for the creation of adaptive, interactive, multi-channel
experiences. We are looking for people that understand how to build storyworlds, and we invite submissions for an altered reality storyworld experience that is delivered to audiences across multiple media platforms. In return, Conducttr will award three winners
with a 1-year Conducttr Indie subscription, 2 hours mentorship on your project via Skype, and the projects showcased in Conducttr’s transmedia Newsletter. Full competition details and submission instructions for Conducttr’s Adaptive Storyworld Challenge can
be found here. You have until 30 September 2017 to complete your work and submit your presentation for consideration. Winners will be announced
at the Transmedia Earth Conference.
The spoken languages for the conference will be English and Spanish, with translation facilities provided.

Full conference website: http://the-transmedia-earth-conference.webflow.io/ 

The Fan Studies Network Conference 2016

December 9, 2015

THE FAN STUDIES NETWORK CONFERENCE 2016

25-26th June 2016
University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK

FSN2016

Keynote Speaker:
Professor Henry Jenkins (University of Southern California, USA).

The fourth annual Fan Studies Network Conference is returning to the University of East Anglia for a two-day programme in June 2016. The conference will continue FSN’s proud tradition of offering an enthusiastic space for interdisciplinary researchers at all levels to connect, share resources, and further develop their research ideas. In addition to panel presentations, the two days will feature social events, speed geeking, and workshop discussions.

We are delighted to welcome Professor Henry Jenkins as the keynote speaker for FSN2016. Jenkins’ work has proved extremely influential in the field: He is the author/editor of thirteen books on various aspects of media and popular culture, including Convergence Culture: Where Old and New Media Collide; Fans, Bloggers and Gamers: Exploring Participatory Culture, and one of the key texts of the first wave of fan studies, Textual Poachers: Television Fans and Participatory Culture.

Registration is open here:
http://store.uea.ac.uk/browse/extra_info.asp?compid=1&modid=2&deptid=9&catid=4&prodid=41

And the conference programme can be found here:

FSN 2016 draft Programme v2

Please send any enquires about the conference to: fsnconference@gmail.com

You can join the discussion about the event on Twitter using #FSN2016, or visit http://www.fanstudies.org.

CFP: Transmediality in Modern Popular Culture, Poland, 18-20 June 2015

January 29, 2015

Transmediality in Modern Popular Culture – Call for Submissions

The 9th Annual Conference of NECS – European Network of Cinema and Media Studies (www.necs.org) will take place in Łódź (Poland) on 18-20 June 2015. In reference to one of the conference’s sub-themes “The archive of popular culture” a workshop on the history of transmediality in modern popular culture will be held. It will focus on the exploration of cross-media business synergies in the entertainment industry and on the history of media convergence in the 19th and the first half of the 20th century popular culture.

The workshop will consist of two parts:

· 17 June: a preconference with a keynote lecture (Dr. Matthew Freeman, Birmingham City University) and a seminar

· 18-20 June: a set of dedicated panels during the NECS conference

SCOPE
Media convergence is one of the widely debated concepts in contemporary media research. As conceptualised by Henry Jenkins, convergence manifests itself i.e. in transmedia storytelling (Jenkins, 2006: 334). The investigation of transmediality, however, most often concentrates on contemporary networked digital media. As concerns the historical research of popular culture, transmediality is limitedly explored (however not entirely unexamined). Yet that kind of cross-textual practices can be traced as early as the modern culture industry came into existence. For example, according to Matthew Freeman, at the beginning of the 20th century in the USA we can find examples of “cross-textual self-promotion and cross-media branding (…), grounded in such cultural factors as turn-of-the-century immigration, new forms of mass media – such as, most notably, newspapers, comic strips, and magazines – and consumerism and other related textual activities” (2014: 2).

Therefore, we would like to explore the transmedial dimension of pop culture in the 19th and the first half of the 20th century. How did motives, characters, narratives circulate between various media platforms and cultural circuits? What was the transmedial dimension of the emerging global culture industry? How did mediatization processes impact on local practices (especially in the peripheral media environments)?

POSSIBLE TOPICS
Going beyond traditional notions of adaptation, remediation and intermediality, we would like to reconsider dominant history of media in modernity and to examine the constitution of the transmedia dimension of culture industry and entertainment. We are interested in transmedia flows, business synergies and connections between different media and cultural spheres:

· literature

· radio

· cinema

· music

· stage (cabaret, revue, vaudeville, variété)

· popular press

· comic strips

· graphic design and advertisement

· modern art

Submission may include, but are not limited to, the following themes:

· circulation of texts, motives, etc. in the 19th and early 20th century (i.e. vaudeville and radio relations)

· business synergies between film, radio, press, phonographic industry, etc.

· local histories of the proliferation of the technical media (especially in the peripheral and semi-peripheral countries)

· relations between “transmedia” and theories of intertextuality, adaptation, etc.

· vernacular practices of media producers and audiences

· vernacular reception and grassroot practices of fans

Theoretical and historical contributions concerning all geographical areas before 1939 are welcomed.

SUBMISSIONS & DETAILS
Please address abstracts (max. 200 words) along with institutional affiliation and a short bio (max. 150 words) to: lukasz.biskupski@swps.edu.pl

Deadline for submission: 31.01.2015. Confirmation will follow shortly thereafter.
The workshop language is English.
Workshop attendance is free, but valid NECS-membership is required to participate, see: http://necs.org/user/register.

Organizers: Łukasz Biskupski (University of Social Sciences and Humanities SWPS in Warsaw), Mirosław Filiciak (University of Social Sciences and Humanities SWPS in Warsaw) and Michał Pabiś-Orzeszyna (University of Łódź).

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT
The organization of the workshop is supported by the Polish National Center for Science under Grant DEC-2012/07/E/HS2/03878.

Transmedia Storytelling and Its Reception: Economies and Politics of Participation

January 13, 2015

Transmedia Storytelling and Its Reception:
Economies and Politics of Participation
Schloss Herrenhausen, Hanover
25-27 February 2015

Hailed by many as a paradigm shift in the way stories are told and experienced, transmedia storytelling has in recent years become a firmly established practice and presence in mainstream media. The conference “Transmedia Storytelling and Its Reception: Economies and Politics of Participation” brings together a group of national and international experts who will engage with mainly two aspects of the phenomenon. The first is the theorisation and specification of transmedia storytelling as a storytelling mode and a cultural product, for example in relation to intermediality, franchising, games and the notion of storyworlds. The second concerns the reception of transmedia narratives. Transmedial story set-ups can be highly complex and, especially when they involve the so-called social media, can challenge the traditional unidirectional model of textual communication. At the same time they raise questions about the means of creating audience immersion, about offers of participation and interactivity – or a lack thereof – and about the implications of transmedial narratives for notions of production and reception. Addressing psychological and physiological aspects of transmedia reception as well as questions of transmedia literacy and reception aesthetics, the conference offers an array of perspectives on the reception of transmedial narratives.

The conference brings together experts from the fields of media studies, literary studies, communication studies and cultural studies, as well as practitioners, journalists and editors. Speakers include Sarah Atkins (University of Brighton, UK), Martin Butler (University of Oldenburg), Elizabeth Evans (University of Nottingham, UK), Dorothea Martin (Das wilde Dutzend Verlag), Irina Rajewsky (FU Berlin), Pamela Rutledge (Fielding Graduate University, USA), Eckart Voigts (Braunschweig University) and Mark J.P. Wolf (Concordia University Wisconsin, USA).

One of the aims of the conference is to offer a platform for exchange among young scholars. We would therefore like to invite them in particular to join us and contribute to the interdisciplinary discussion that we are hoping to generate. For further information, please see the conference website:https://www.tu-braunschweig.de/anglistik/seminar/liku/forschung/projekte

Conference convenors: PD Dr. Monika Pietrzak-Franger (University of Hamburg)
PD Dr. Lucia Krämer (Leibniz University Hanover)

Contact: transmedia@tu-braunschweig.de (Registration possible until 10 February 2015)

The conference is sponsored by the VolkswagenStifung.

CFP: Media Archaeologies Forum: Journal of Contemporary Archaeology

January 3, 2015
Media Archaeologies Forum: Journal of Contemporary Archaeology

The recent emergence of ‘media archaeologies’ is an exciting theoretical and methodological shift within media studies. In 2010, in The Routledge Companion to Film History (ed. William Guynn), Erkki Huhtamo defined ‘media archaeology’ as ‘a particular way of studying media as a historically attuned enterprise’ that involves researchers ‘”excavating” forgotten media-cultural phenomena that have been left outside the canonized narratives about media culture and history’ (203). In the same year, Jussi Parikka added that ‘media archaeology needs to insist both on the material nature of its enterprise – that media are always articulated in material, also in non-narrative frameworks whether technical media such as phonographs, or algorithmic such as databases and software networks – and that the work of assembling temporal mediations takes place in an increasingly varied and distributed network of institutions, practices and technological platforms’ (http://mediacartographies.blogspot.ca/2010/10/what-is-media-archaeology-beta.html). German media theorist and trained archaeologist, Wolfgang Ernst, describes media archaeology’s focus on the ‘nondiscursive infrastructure and (hidden) programs of media’ (2013, Digital Memory and the Archive, p. 59). If media archaeologists such as Thomas Elsaesser, Wolfgang Ernst, Lisa Gitelman, Erkki Huhtamo, Jussi Parikka, Cornelia Vismann and Siegfried Zielinski are interested in scalar change, material-discursive assemblages and deep time relations as they pertain to media technologies and networks, how might archaeologists with interests in the media actively contribute to the shaping of this field?

Alongside archaeology’s discursive travels across the humanities, most notoriously via Michel Foucault, archaeologists have long engaged with media. From Silicon Valley to Atari dumps, from the mobile phone to the media technologies of post-war astronomy and from telegraphy to the material-discursive actions of media as sensory prostheses, the global archaeological community has produced a large number of important studies of media techno-assemblages that both map specifically archaeological approaches and push at the limits of archaeology as a discipline. What are the archaeological specificities that mark out a distinct disciplinary approach to understanding media? How might the practices of media archaeologists such as Huhtamo, Parikka, et al challenge assumptions that archaeologists located within the discipline might have about their methodological and conceptual specificities? In short, where are the boundaries between media archaeologies and archaeologies of media? How are those boundaries drawn, performed and maintained? And how might we work together to ask new questions of media technologies and their relations?

This forum invites contributors to submit responses to the provocations contained in the first paragraph. The forum invites contributors to draw out key archaeological theories and practices to contribute to the rich field of media ecologies, archaeologies and ‘variatologies’ in order to explore the implications of distinct yet diverse archaeological approaches to media assemblages. Commentaries are welcomed in the form of short texts (1,000 – 3,000 words) or in any other genre suitable for print, including drawings and images. We welcome especially original thoughts and specific examples from around the world.

Commentaries will be selected in terms of originality, diversity and depth and will be published in a forthcoming Forum in Journal of Contemporary Archaeology (http://www.equinoxpub.com/journals/index.php/JCA). Deadline for submissions is 3 February 2015.

For submissions and questions, please contact Angela Piccini, a.a.piccini@bristol.ac.uk.

CFP: From Robson Green to Sean Bean: Mapping Northern Stardom on Popular British Television

September 10, 2014

Special dossier for the Journal of Popular Television

Edited by Beth Johnson (Keele University) and David Forrest (University of Sheffield)

We invite contributions that explore the stars of the North of England on contemporary British television. Considering and examining the intersections between stardom, Northern places, spaces and identities, the purpose of this dossier is to argue for the existence of a Northern consciousness on television that is characterized through the figure of the Northern star. In particular, this dossier is to explore how the public and private personas of Northern stars are frequently merged when such performers enact or perform Northern characters. Accordingly, we would like to receive proposals for full length articles/case-studies of specific Northern television stars. In particular, we encourage proposals (though proposers are not limited to these) on the following:
         
Robson Green         
Sean Bean       
John Simm          
Sue Johnston          
Ricky Tomlinson          
Caroline Aherne         
Karl Pilkington        
Sarah Lancashire         
Chris Bisson          
Lesley Sharpe       
Maxine Peake         
Ant and Dec         
Christopher Eccleston          
Gina Mckee

Please submit an extended abstract of 500 words to b.l.johnson@keele.ac.uk and d.forrest@sheffield.ac.uk (entitled Northern Stardom), by 30th September 2014. Please also include a brief biographical note.  

We plan to complete evaluation of abstracts by the end of October.  Those accepted will be asked to submit completed article, to a maximum of 8,000 words, by the end of March 2015. Articles will then be submitted for peer review.

CALL FOR CONTRIBUTORS: SPECIAL ISSUE OF INFINITE EARTHS – “NORDIC NOIR & THE SCANDINAVIAN INVASION”

March 1, 2014

CALL FOR CONTRIBUTORS: SPECIAL ISSUE OF INFINITE EARTHS – “NORDIC NOIR & THE SCANDINAVIAN INVASION”

Since the publication and inordinate success of Stieg Larsson’s The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo series of novels globally, the genre of so-called ‘Nordic Noir’ has fast become a cultural phenomenon both in the United Kingdom and on the international stage. BBC Four’s recent broadcast of The Killing, The Bridge, Borgen and Wallander have been met with critical acclaim and influenced a surge in the popularity of Scandinavian Crime Fiction in film, perhaps more pointedly, literature. Lars Kepler, Jusse Adler-Olsen, Hakan Nesser, Jo Nesbo, and many more besides.

This special issue of Infinite Earths seeks contributions that analyse, dissect or review these texts from inter-disciplinary perspectives. The pieces should range from 1000 words onwards and may include reviews of TV series, books or films that fit within this purview. Topics can range from the following (but if you have an idea you would like to share, please do not hesitate in contacting me):

The Bridge
The Killing (series and novels)
Borgen
Literature
Sjowall and Wahloo
Henning Mankell
Stieg Larsson
Hakan Nessen
Jo Nesbo (films and books)
Jan Costin Wagner

Deadline: 1 April 2014

Contact: billyproctor@hotmail.co.uk
http://www.infiniteearths.co.uk

Call for Papers: Pop Culture and World Politics Conference

September 1, 2012

Pop Culture and World Politics v5.0
9-11 November 2012
Hobart and William Smith Colleges – Geneva, NY 14456 USA

** KEYNOTE SPEAKERS **
Anne Elizabeth Moore, award-winning author, publisher, zinester and feminist activist
Reverend Billy, of the Church of Not Shopping
Elisa Kreisinger, pop culture pirate and feminist video remix artist
Legs McNeil (tentative), legendary author and rock music historian

What do zombies have to do with world politics? How might the Twilight sagas inform and illuminate our way of understanding world politics and changes in the global political economy? In what ways do videogames, the sales of which now exceed those of music CDs and DVDS combined, shape the identities and political understandings of frequent players? Is visual media destined to replace print as the primary source of news and entertainment in advanced industrial societies and how might this affect the construction of meaning of world affairs? As a means of communication readily available to an ever-expanding number of individuals and groups, how might the internet offer paths of resistance to corporate and Western news and entertainment hegemony? How can tango dancing make the world a more peaceful place?

This conference explores the multiple ways of investigating the intersections of world politics and the production, circulation, content, and consumption of various popular cultural forms. Engaging a range of disciplines and practices in the social sciences, humanities and the arts, the conference encourages participants to question what terms such as ‘global,’ ‘popular,’ and ‘culture’ mean both in isolation and when used in conjunction. It asks in what ways and with what effects popular culture has become a series of sites at which political meaning is made, where political contestation takes place, and where political orthodoxy is reproduced and challenged. The conference provides a highly-focused and interdisciplinary environment in which the increasing numbers of scholars that are engaging in culture-related research can present their work and participate in the kind of extended discussion that larger conferences do not permit. The conference aims to provide an intimate forum at which debates about interdisciplinary methods and theoretical approaches can be developed to facilitate debate across disciplines that share interests in world politics and culture. We welcome proposals for performances, screenings, panels, or individual papers, on any aspect of world politics and popular culture.

Building on the preceding four PCWP conferences, version 5.0 will be held on the campus of Hobart and William Smith Colleges, a small liberal arts institution located in the beautiful Finger Lakes (wine-making) region of western New York state.

If you are interested in attending the conference please submit a brief abstract of your paper, panel proposal (including the names and titles of each presentation) or artistic contribution (max. 450 words) to PCWP@hws.edu. The deadline for proposals is 5 September 2012.
www.hws.edu/PCWP2012

Call for Papers: Superhero Synergies: Studying Genre in the Age of Digital Convergence

September 1, 2012

“Superhero Synergies: Genre in the Age of Digital Convergence”

Edited by
James Gilmore (UCLA) and Matthias Stork (UCLA)

Publisher: Scarecrow Press

Since the late 1990s, the proliferation of digital media has opened up a seemingly infinite horizon of narrative possibilities in transmedia storytelling. Traditional ideas about the look and the texture of cinema, television, and comics have equally undergone striking revision in the age of digital convergence. New technologies–including 3-D, video on-demand, and electronic tablets–change the ways we think about media production, aesthetics, and consumption. Digital media have made popular culture a malleable entity to be modified continuously. As a result, popular media do not exist in isolation, but converge into complex multidimensional objects. The Internet further relays this multidimensionality via discussion forums, fan fiction, and video-based criticism.

Nowhere has this phenomenon been more persistent, more creative, or sparked more discussion than in the superhero genre. While the genre is home to many of the most financially successful films of the last 15 years, it has also developed life in video games, digital comics, Internet criticism, video essays, novelizations, television programs, and other forms of media. These media may speak to each other–as in a video game based on the film The Avengers which is, in turn, based on a series of Marvel comic books–or incorporate and critique forms of media–as when the television series Heroes consciously employs comic book aesthetics as a central narrative component. The superhero genre thus forms an ideal lynchpin to examine the contemporary landscape of popular media convergence.

The goal of this anthology is to explore the intricate relationship between superheroes and digital media in an era of convergence. Specifically, we encourage contributors to consider analytical, research-driven, and theoretical work that tackles the problems and possibilities of convergence culture as it relates to the experience and study of superheroes in the contemporary world of digital media. While the anthology incorporates a theoretical dimension, we predominantly seek submissions that emphasize the experience of superheroes and analysis of superhero images in this expanding and converging digital landscape.

Topics may include but are not limited to:
* How do conceptions of “genre” and “narrative” change amidst the interaction of multiple digital media forms?
* Adaptation: How might superhero texts accent themselves as acts of adaptation? How do digital media and transmedia storytelling transform the notion of fidelity?
* Reception study: What opportunities do digital media present for spectators to interact with each other and the media texts, and what are the scope and shape of those fandom culture interactions (i.e. avatar creation, fan fiction, video essay criticism)?
* Textual/aesthetic analysis: How do the texts themselves–comics, films, video games, etc.–employ digital media and technology? In what ways do their aesthetics and structures communicate a converging digital landscape?
* Cultural studies: How do digital media inform the discourse of socio-cultural issues within the genre, its texts, and their reception? How might digital media convergence foster a more complex discourse of these social, cultural, or political issues central to the genre–or do they?
* Marketing aesthetics: How do the advertising strategies for individual texts take advantage of an array of new media technologies?
* Film criticism: How does contemporary criticism use digital media technology to analyze and chronicle the development of the superhero genre?
* Gender analysis: How are male and female bodies figured in the superhero genre, and how have those representations changed over time and across different forms of media?

Interested writers should submit a proposal of approximately 400-600 words. Each proposal should clearly state 1) the research question and/or theoretical goals of the essay, 2) the essay’s relationship to the anthology’s core issues, and 3) a potential bibliography. Please also include a brief CV. Accepted essays should plan to be approximately 6,000-7,000 words.

Deadline for proposals: November 1, 2012

Please send proposals to both contact e-mails:

James Gilmore: james.n.gilmore@gmail.com
Matthias Stork: mstork@ucla.edu

Publication timetable:
November 1, 2012 – Deadline for Proposals
December 15, 2012 – Notification of Acceptance Decisions
April 15, 2013 – Chapter Drafts Due
July 15, 2013 – Chapter Revisions Due
August 30, 2013 – Final Revisions Due

Acceptance will be contingent upon the contributors’ ability to meet these deadlines, and to deliver professional-quality work.

If you have any questions, please contact the editors.

Call for Papers: Popular Culture and Language/Written Word

September 1, 2012

California State University, Fullerton’s Sigma Tau Delta English Honors Society invites submissions to its fall conference. We are looking to reach across disciplines in a conference titled Popular Culture and the Written Word.

This conference will be a great opportunity for any undergraduate or graduate students of any discipline looking to gain more experience in an academic setting. We will offer an array of different conference events from round tables and panel discussions to workshops and keynote speaker presentations.

This conference will be held at

California State University, Fullerton
Nov. 30th-Dec. 1st

We are seeking proposals on any aspect of popular culture and language, including the following topics:

• Graphic Novels and Comic Book Culture
• Popular Fiction
• Popular Non-Fiction
• Young Adult Literature
• Television
• Film
• Print Media
• Advertisements
• Fan Culture
• Video Games and Video Game Culture
• History of Popular Culture

We are looking for both paper and poster board proposals to participate in round table discussions and panel presentations. Please send submissions to PopCulture.CSUF@gmail.com by October 26th and include your name, university affiliation, and indicate whether you are an undergraduate or a graduate student. Proposals should be 250-300 words.

*Feel free to contact Sigma Tau Delta president, Lauren Bailey at laurenbailey@csu.fullerton.edu, if you have any additional questions or concerns.