Archive for August, 2014

CFP: Deletion—Deviation: The Perversions of Science Fiction symposium, Feb 19&20 2015, Deakin University, Melbourne, Australia

August 29, 2014

Deletion—Deviation: The Perversions of Science Fiction

Call for Papers

Science Fiction exists in a state of tension between the pleasurable and the perverse — of the pleasure gained from its fictive forms, and the perversions of facts and flesh within its speculative futures, imagined worlds and creative appropriations of technological innovation.
There is an immutable thread that runs throughout science fiction, that which “distinguishes its fictional worlds to one degree or another from the world in which we live” (Roberts, 2000), worlds perhaps characterised by Darko Suvin’s ‘estrangement’ or Samuel Delaney’s ‘reading/writing effects.’ The ways in which this distinction is maintained traces the nebulous line between the pleasurable and perverse in science fiction. How does the pleasure of its fiction collide with the perversions of the ‘world in which we live’?
This symposium looks to the very edge of science fictional possibilities, at the many perversions and pleasures that can take place when pushing the boundaries of science fictional imaginings.

Possible topics for papers may include:
Perversion(s) of science fact in science fiction
Environmental perversions in science fiction
Perversions of the body in science fiction
Queer imaginings in SF
Sex in SF
Perverse pleasure in science fiction
Trauma in SF
Perverse greed in SF
SF and psychosexuality(s)
Acts of violence in SF texts
Trans-humanism
The perverse imagination and science fiction
Perverse characters/perverse worlds
Perversions of form in science fiction cinema
The perverse “What If?”

Deletion—Deviation: The Perversions of Science Fiction will take place February 19th and 20th at Deakin University’s City Prime location, 3/550 Bourke St. Melbourne.

We invite contributions that address any of these areas around the deviant or perverse in of literature, film, gaming, art, and science and technology, and any other field with an investment in the deviant or perverse in science fiction.

This symposium will allow for a future edited collection on the open access online forum for science fiction studies Deletion (www.deletionscifi.org), aiming for publication in mid 2015.
We welcome abstracts of 300-350 words, along with a short biography, emailed to grady.hancock@deakin.edu.au or leon.marvell@deakin.edu.au by Friday October 31st. Notification of acceptance of articles will be by Friday November 18th.

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CFP: Otherness and Transgression in Celebrity and Fan Cultures, Aarhus University, Denmark, 21-22 November 2014 *EXTENDED DEADLINE*

August 29, 2014

Otherness and Transgression in Celebrity and Fan Cultures
Hosted by the Cultural Transformations Research Group, Aarhus University.
November 21-22, 2014
LOCATION: AARHUS UNIVERSITY, DENMARK.
*NEW EXTENDED DEADLINE FOR CALL FOR PAPERS*: SEPTEMBER 5, 2014

Keynote speaker:
Matt Hills, Aberystwyth University –
“Fans as Celebrities, Celebrities as Fans: The Rise of an Affective Economy?”

The notions of otherness and transgression play an essential part in the cultural work and practices celebrities and fandoms perform inasmuch as these concepts are inseparable from the celebrity and fan cultural processes of social in/exclusion, identification and dissociation, uniformity and diversification,
and forces both drawing and disrupting demarcations between normalcy and deviance. To the extent that these processes are actively shaped by and partake in shaping our desires, contempt, ways of thinking and being, otherness and transgression constitute pertinent sites for critical exploration within
the two overlapping fields of research, Fan and Celebrity Studies.
A complex and multivalent term, otherness is conventionally signaled by markers of “difference” and the unknown. As difference remains a condition for any determinate sense of identity, otherness is also inevitably implicit and complicit in considerations of subjectivity, identity, and sameness rendering it a pivotal aspect in discussions on both their constitution and impossibility. Likewise, in the field of Fan and Celebrity culture – where categories such as class, gender, race, sexuality, and age dynamically intersect and interact in manifold ways – the identity work, social meanings, and cultural preferences informing both these cultures’ production and consumption of cultural and media texts are also
constantly negotiated. Reflexive of the values, biases, and tensions of the social body, they are useful indicators of contemporary configurations and devices for othering; for example, the ways in which the discourses of immorality, pathology, monstrosity, impropriety, and cultism, among others, inform the construction of difference, and function as vehicles for othering that additionally cut diagonally across various imbricating “-isms,” such as racism, heterosexism, ageism, ableism, and lookism.
As difference often implies the perception of deviance, otherness is accompanied by the constant impending threat of transgression, to undo and redraw the differentiating limits determining the
provisional identities of entities, behaviors, and bodies. While transgression refers to a violation and exceeding of bounds, it also ambiguously realizes and completes these boundaries as it helps define them and reaffirms a given social order by designating the illicit. This dialectic of the de/stabilizing
effects of transgression summons further inquiry in relation to fandoms and celebrity cultures, in which deviance is an attractive commercial component. Construed as particularly excessive, both celebrity personas and subcultural fan practices are defined by their distance from the norm, but where celebrity
culture concerns the consumption of transgressive content and narratives of extraordinary personalities, in the case of fan culture, consumption itself is purportedly transgressive. Celebrities are conventionally conceptualized as power-saturated signs seductively reinforcing cultural norms – either
through glossy portraits of charismatic individuals advertizing luxurious lifestyles and the censure of celebrities in the scandal genre respectively – and fandoms, conversely, as subversively contesting these norms through the fetishistic appropriation of cultural icons, media products, and playful textual poaching. However, hardly homogenous, both celebrity power and fandoms channel a multitude of contradictory and inconsistent ideological inflections, and entail a complex mesh of conformity and heterogeneity, which informs, for example, the social interaction among fans and their interpretive communities, whose internal fractions struggle over affect and meaning, as well as the pervasive circulation and currency of certain im/proper celebrity images and fan identities. Accordingly, the need to study, explain, and analyze the semiotic labor invested in the celebrity sign and by the fan in a given media product respectively only becomes greater.
In light of today’s new socio-political subjectivities, prosumer and participatory culture, new technologies and distributive modes, expanding networks, and means of communication enabling transcultural proximity between individuals from different parts of the world, new encounters, expressions, and understandings have emerged and with it, transformed nuances of othering, saming, and transgression. As a result, Fan and Celebrity cultures, are in need of a reappraisal in which the new fickle and permeable boundaries between identities, cultural practices, private and public spheres, products and consumers, celebrity and fan bodies, intimacy and estrangement are investigated.
Refracting otherness and transgression from overlapping prisms, the pleasures, representations, productions, and affects of celebrity and fan cultures opens up a fruitful and invigorating space for further research.
It is this variety of formulations which this conference wishes to convene on from divergent disciplinary and theoretical perspectives. The Cultural Transformations Research Group at Aarhus University therefore invites submissions exploring celebrity and fan cultures within the scope of the critical spaces and contexts offered by otherness and transgression.

WELCOME TOPICS INCLUDE BUT ARE NOT LIMITED TO THE FOLLOWING:
The Intersection of Celebrity and Fan Studies
Sex, Gender, Sexual Differing, and Queering the Fan / Celebrity Body
Cross-Over Celebrities; Ethnicity, Hybridity, and Fandom in Transcultural Contexts
Celebrity Representations of Dis/ability and through Fan Works
The Intersectionalities of Social Categories in Celebrity and Fan Cultures
Notoriety, Infamy, Scandal, Deviance, and Excess
Social Media and the Construction of Celebrity as Other
The Construction of Otherness in Fandom and Fan Works
Monstrosity, the Abject, and Uncanny in Fan Fiction, Fandoms, and Celebrityhood
Pathology, Addiction, Cultism, Confession, and Therapy
Mashing and Vidding: Viral and Violating
Authenticity, Secrecy, Intimacy, and Publicity
Post-feminist Celebrity Narratives and Cultural Forms
Power, Prosumerism, and Participatory Culture
New Modes of Self-Other Relations within Para-social Contexts
Fan and/or Celebrity Shaming
The (Im)Material Other Worlds of Fandoms and the Alternative Spaces of Fan Communities

PUBLICATION OPPORTUNITIES
We are pleased to announce that qualified research papers are considered for prospective publication in a special issue of the peer-reviewed journal Otherness: Essays and Studies,
http://www.otherness.dk/journal/. Submitted articles will follow the standard review process of the journal.

PROCEDURE FOR SUBMITTING PROPOSALS FOR PAPERS
The conference is open to scholars and students of all disciplines. Those wishing to participate in the conference are invited to submit an abstract of no more than 300 words to the organisers at otcelebrityfan@gmail.com by 5 September, 2014. The convenors will have reviewed the
abstracts and notified the authors of whether their proposals have been accepted no later than
September 12, 2014. Papers may be given in English with citations in any language, and are limited to 20 minutes.
All questions regarding conference content (abstracts, presentations, speakers etc.) may be directed to the organizers at otcelebrityfan@gmail.com.

CONFERENCE COMMITTEE:
Matthias Stephan, Ph.D. scholar Claus Toft-Nielsen, Ph.D.
Lise Dilling-Hansen, Ph.D. scholar Susan Yi Sencindiver, Ph.D.

Call for Chapter Proposals: Public Relations and Participatory Culture: Fandom, Social Media and Community Engagement

August 12, 2014

CALL FOR CHAPTER PROPOSALS: PUBLIC RELATIONS AND PARTICIPATORY CULTURE: FANDOM, SOCIAL MEDIA, AND COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT.

We invite submissions of chapter proposals for Public Relations and Participatory Culture: Fandom, Social Media, and Community Engagement. This edited volume, to be published by Routledge in 2015, will examine the relationships and interactions between fans and organizational public relations efforts.

The purpose of this volume is to integrate stakeholder and publics theories with those of participatory cultures and media studies/fan perspectives, and to add new, fresh insight into the public relations discipline’s concept of publics and segmentation. The chapters selected for inclusion in this volume will explore challenges, opportunities, and the diversity of fan activity and relationships from a variety of perspectives, including international and intercultural. The situations analyzed will also reflect the diversity of PR situations that involve fan-publics, i.e. not limited to entertainment products. These chapters will help to answer the question: How, as practitioners, can we create meaningful, ethical, and mutually-beneficial relationships between brands/organizations and fans?

We welcome submissions from educators and practitioner on a variety of topics, including (but not limited to):
• Power, co-creation, messages, and fans
• Application of PR theories to audience studies
• Connecting fan research and fan studies theories to the segmentation of publics
• Participatory culture, transmedia, and engagement/active publics
• Community management, social media, and fan publics
• Brand community management
• Fan resistance
• New models for segmenting engaged publics
• Researching online fan-brand communities
• Circuit of culture and segmentation of fans and publics
• Crowdsourcing, crowd-funding, and activating publics

Scholars and practitioners interested in submitting chapter proposals should include a 250-word abstract and a one-page outline of your proposed chapter to co-editor Amber Hutchins at ahutch13@kennesaw.edu. Chapter proposals are due no later than September 1, 2014.

Questions can be directed to coeditors Amber L. Hutchins, Kennesaw State University (ahutch13@kennesaw.edu) or Natalie Tindall, Georgia State University (drnatalietjtindall@gmail.com)

CFP: Diffractions journal -special issue – Popping the Question: The Question of Popular Culture

August 8, 2014

Call for Articles

Diffractions – Graduate Journal for the Study of Culture

POPPING THE QUESTION: THE QUESTION OF POPULAR CULTURE

Deadline for article submissions: November 30, 2014​

As a concept, the popular – or popular culture for that matter – has never ceased to be debatable and ambivalent. Although it has come to occupy a particular place under the spotlight over the past decades within the broad study of culture, such apparently privileged position has not deprived it of the manifold ambiguities, complexities or misconceptions that have often involved its general understanding (John Storey, 2012; Angela McRobbie, 1994; Andrew Ross, 1989; John Fiske, 1989).

Following its emergence within the context of the processes of industrialization and the changes they brought about, namely in terms of cultural relations and the development of the capitalist market economy, the concept of popular culture was, for a considerable period of time, not only utterly rejected by intellectuals and scholars alike, but also denied any possibility of constituting a serious and valid topic for academic debate. Up until the mid twentieth-century, popular culture was often equated to a poor and simplistic form of entertainment and pleasure, and was even deemed morally and ethically questionable, not to mention aesthetically. However, and particularly after the 1950s, new perspectives would soon alter this perception in very significant ways, especially with the emergence of Cultural Studies and the influence their project had on both sides of the Atlantic (Lawrence Grossberg, 1997). From severe condemnation, popular culture quickly evolved into a discourse of positive reception and celebration, which resulted from critical work developed inside the academia, but also popular demand outside it.

The concept of the popular was then adopted both as an intrinsic feature, and as topic in its own right of artistic creation developed under the sign of pop. From pop art to pop music, a new understanding of culture has been put forth, building from what is embedded in the ambivalence of the popular and its many possibilities of intersection with new artistic forms of expression.

After the first decade of the twenty-first century, popular culture finds itself at a crossroads: has the concept been drained of its meaning because of its overwhelming popularity? After the euphoria around the popular, what afterlife can be expected from it? Should we still be discussing the popular as opposed to high and folk culture? And where and how do pop art forms intersect with the current notion of the popular?

Themes to be addressed by contributors may include but are not restricted to the following:
§ Popular Culture in Theory
§ Life and Afterlife of Popular Culture
§ Popular, Power and Politics
§ Popular Culture: Globalization, Centres and Peripheries
§ Material Culture
§ Popular music studies
§ Celebrity culture and Fandom: The Dynamics of Popularity
§ Contemporary Cinema and Digital Culture
§ 2.0 and Convergence practices§ Youth cultures, Subcultures, Scenes and Tribes
§ Retromania, Nostalgia and Authenticity
§ Pop and Popular: Overlap, Dissemblance and Divergence
§ Popular Culture and the Practices of Everyday Life
§ Folklore, Tradition and Preservation§ National Identities and Transnational Circulations
§ Cultural memory and popular culture
§ Fashion and luxury
§ Television and the Seriality of Popular Culture
§ Feminism, Postfeminism and Popular Culture
§ Popular Culture and Masculinities
§ Queering Popular Culture
§ Games Culture and New Media
§ Graffiti, Street Art and Urban Policies
§ Creative Industries and Cultural Economy

We look forward to receiving full articles of no more than 20 A4 pages (not including bibliography) and a short bio of about 150 words by November 30, 2014 at the following address: submissions@diffractions.net.
DIFFRACTIONS also accepts book reviews that may not be related to the issue’s topic. If you wish to write a book review, feel free to check the books available athttp://www.diffractions.net/books-for-review and contact us at reviews@diffractions.net.

Diffractions is the international, online and peer-reviewed journal of the doctoral program in Culture Studies at the Catholic University of Portugal. Find us online at http://www.diffractions.net and http://www.facebook.com/diffractionsjournal.

REGISTRATI​ON OPEN: Fan Studies Network Conference 2014

August 1, 2014

Dear all,

We are delighted to announce that registration for the Fan Studies Network Conference 2014 is now open. The event will take place on 27-28 September at Regent’s University, London. You can register on the conference webpage here:

http://www.regents.ac.uk/events/the-fan-studies-network-conference.aspx

There are very limited spaces for the event, so we urge you to register as soon as possible. Full information about prices and location can be found via the link above.

The current final programme is available to view online here:

https://fanstudies.files.wordpress.com/2014/09/fsn-2014-final-full-programme.pdf

Any questions, please email us at fsnconference@gmail.com

We think this will be a very exciting conference – we hope to see you there!

The FSN conference team