Posts Tagged ‘CFP’

Call for Papers: Superhero Synergies: Studying Genre in the Age of Digital Convergence

September 1, 2012

“Superhero Synergies: Genre in the Age of Digital Convergence”

Edited by
James Gilmore (UCLA) and Matthias Stork (UCLA)

Publisher: Scarecrow Press

Since the late 1990s, the proliferation of digital media has opened up a seemingly infinite horizon of narrative possibilities in transmedia storytelling. Traditional ideas about the look and the texture of cinema, television, and comics have equally undergone striking revision in the age of digital convergence. New technologies–including 3-D, video on-demand, and electronic tablets–change the ways we think about media production, aesthetics, and consumption. Digital media have made popular culture a malleable entity to be modified continuously. As a result, popular media do not exist in isolation, but converge into complex multidimensional objects. The Internet further relays this multidimensionality via discussion forums, fan fiction, and video-based criticism.

Nowhere has this phenomenon been more persistent, more creative, or sparked more discussion than in the superhero genre. While the genre is home to many of the most financially successful films of the last 15 years, it has also developed life in video games, digital comics, Internet criticism, video essays, novelizations, television programs, and other forms of media. These media may speak to each other–as in a video game based on the film The Avengers which is, in turn, based on a series of Marvel comic books–or incorporate and critique forms of media–as when the television series Heroes consciously employs comic book aesthetics as a central narrative component. The superhero genre thus forms an ideal lynchpin to examine the contemporary landscape of popular media convergence.

The goal of this anthology is to explore the intricate relationship between superheroes and digital media in an era of convergence. Specifically, we encourage contributors to consider analytical, research-driven, and theoretical work that tackles the problems and possibilities of convergence culture as it relates to the experience and study of superheroes in the contemporary world of digital media. While the anthology incorporates a theoretical dimension, we predominantly seek submissions that emphasize the experience of superheroes and analysis of superhero images in this expanding and converging digital landscape.

Topics may include but are not limited to:
* How do conceptions of “genre” and “narrative” change amidst the interaction of multiple digital media forms?
* Adaptation: How might superhero texts accent themselves as acts of adaptation? How do digital media and transmedia storytelling transform the notion of fidelity?
* Reception study: What opportunities do digital media present for spectators to interact with each other and the media texts, and what are the scope and shape of those fandom culture interactions (i.e. avatar creation, fan fiction, video essay criticism)?
* Textual/aesthetic analysis: How do the texts themselves–comics, films, video games, etc.–employ digital media and technology? In what ways do their aesthetics and structures communicate a converging digital landscape?
* Cultural studies: How do digital media inform the discourse of socio-cultural issues within the genre, its texts, and their reception? How might digital media convergence foster a more complex discourse of these social, cultural, or political issues central to the genre–or do they?
* Marketing aesthetics: How do the advertising strategies for individual texts take advantage of an array of new media technologies?
* Film criticism: How does contemporary criticism use digital media technology to analyze and chronicle the development of the superhero genre?
* Gender analysis: How are male and female bodies figured in the superhero genre, and how have those representations changed over time and across different forms of media?

Interested writers should submit a proposal of approximately 400-600 words. Each proposal should clearly state 1) the research question and/or theoretical goals of the essay, 2) the essay’s relationship to the anthology’s core issues, and 3) a potential bibliography. Please also include a brief CV. Accepted essays should plan to be approximately 6,000-7,000 words.

Deadline for proposals: November 1, 2012

Please send proposals to both contact e-mails:

James Gilmore: james.n.gilmore@gmail.com
Matthias Stork: mstork@ucla.edu

Publication timetable:
November 1, 2012 – Deadline for Proposals
December 15, 2012 – Notification of Acceptance Decisions
April 15, 2013 – Chapter Drafts Due
July 15, 2013 – Chapter Revisions Due
August 30, 2013 – Final Revisions Due

Acceptance will be contingent upon the contributors’ ability to meet these deadlines, and to deliver professional-quality work.

If you have any questions, please contact the editors.

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Call for Papers: Popular Culture and Language/Written Word

September 1, 2012

California State University, Fullerton’s Sigma Tau Delta English Honors Society invites submissions to its fall conference. We are looking to reach across disciplines in a conference titled Popular Culture and the Written Word.

This conference will be a great opportunity for any undergraduate or graduate students of any discipline looking to gain more experience in an academic setting. We will offer an array of different conference events from round tables and panel discussions to workshops and keynote speaker presentations.

This conference will be held at

California State University, Fullerton
Nov. 30th-Dec. 1st

We are seeking proposals on any aspect of popular culture and language, including the following topics:

• Graphic Novels and Comic Book Culture
• Popular Fiction
• Popular Non-Fiction
• Young Adult Literature
• Television
• Film
• Print Media
• Advertisements
• Fan Culture
• Video Games and Video Game Culture
• History of Popular Culture

We are looking for both paper and poster board proposals to participate in round table discussions and panel presentations. Please send submissions to PopCulture.CSUF@gmail.com by October 26th and include your name, university affiliation, and indicate whether you are an undergraduate or a graduate student. Proposals should be 250-300 words.

*Feel free to contact Sigma Tau Delta president, Lauren Bailey at laurenbailey@csu.fullerton.edu, if you have any additional questions or concerns.

Call for Papers: Game of Thrones

September 1, 2012

The Maester’s Chain:  Essays on George R.R. Martin’s A Song of Ice and Fire

Edited by: Dr. Susan Johnston, Associate Professor of English, University of Regina

Dr. Jes Battis, Assistant Professor of English, University of Regina

“A master forges his chain with study, he told me.  The different metals are each a different kind of learning, gold for the study of money and accounts, silver for healing, iron for warcraft.  And he said there were other meanings as well.”

George R.R. Martin’s epic fantasy series, A Song of Ice and Fire (1991-), has produced a constellation of intertext:  fan fiction, merchandise, artwork, graphic novels, and an acclaimed HBO television program.  Many would argue that the series diverges from traditional epic fantasy, in its preoccupation with the grim realities of a medieval world.  Martin’s ambiguous treatment of the supernatural, and his interest in the radical failure of chivalry, has made A Song of Ice and Fire unique among fantasy texts.  The success of HBO’s Game of Thrones has created new fan communities, possibly reinvigorating the genre as a subject of critical inquiry, although there are significant differences between the source-text and its recent adaptation.  Game of Thrones has also received as much criticism as acclaim, largely due to its presentation of sexuality and violence.

We aim to collect a diversity of essays on the world of Westeros and its characters.  Topics might include, but are not limited to:

  • Adaptation
  • Animals (dire wolves, shape-shifting, animal consciousness)
  • Artwork
  • Childhood
  • Chivalry, monarchy, and other power structures
  • Disability and/or monstrosity
  • Fan communities and texts
  • Food and cultures of consumption
  • History and national myth-making
  • Knowledge networks (maesters, ravens, print culture)
  • Languages (Old Valyrian, Dothraki, Braavosi, and others)
  • Literary antecedents (fantasy traditions, classical and medieval influences)
  • Magic and the supernatural
  • Race and ethnicity
  • Religions (monotheism, polytheism, other treatments of the sacred)
  • Sexualities (reproduction, queerness, eunuchism, prostitution, incest)
  • Songs and mummery

The submission deadline is December 15, 2012.  Abstracts (500 – 1000 words, in .doc or .docx format) should be emailed to:

susan.johnston@uregina.ca
jes.battis@uregina.ca

Completed chapters (20-25 pages, double-spaced) are due April 15, 2013.

Call for Papers: Stardom and Fandom

September 1, 2012

Join us for the 34th Annual Southwest/Texas Popular Culture and American Culture Association Conference, February 13 – 16, 2013 at the Hyatt Regency in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The theme of this year’s conference is “Celebrating Popular/American Culture(s) in a Global Context.” The Special Topics Area Chairs invite paper or panel proposals on any aspect of stardom or fandom.

Proposal submission deadline: November 16, 2012.

Any and all topics will be considered, although we especially encourage proposals on:

The reciprocal relationship between stars and fans
Impact of celebrity and fame on identity construction, reconstruction and sense of self
Reality television and the changing definition of ‘stardom’
The impact of social media on celebrity/fan interaction
Children and stardom (Little Rascals to Toddlers and Tiaras)
Celebrity/fame addiction as cultural change
The intersection of stardom and fandom in virtual and physical spaces
Celebrity and the construction of persona
Pedagogical approaches to teaching stardom and fandom
Straddling the stardom/fandom line: big name fans, bloggers and aca-fans
Anti-fans and ‘haters’
Fan shame and fame shame
Gendered constructions of stars and fans

The list of ideas is limited, so if you have an idea that is not listed, please suggest the new topic. We encourage submissions from multiple perspectives and disciplines.

Submit 250 word paper or panel proposals (with separate abstracts and user accounts for each presenter) to: http://conference2013.swtxpca.org. Choose the area “Special Topics – Stardom and Fandom” and input your information as directed.

Direct questions to: Lynn Zubernis, lzubernis@wcupa.edu

Deadline for proposal submissions: November 16, 2012. Earlier proposals are welcomed and will be responded to with all due haste.

For more details on the conference, please visit the Southwest/Texas Popular Culture/American Culture Association: www.swtxpca.org.

Call for Papers: First Annual FANS Conference

September 1, 2012

We are pleased to announce a CFP for submissions to the First Annual Fandom and Neomedia Studies (FANS) Conference in Dallas, TX, on 1 and 2 June 2013.  We are privileged to have Helen McCarthy as our keynote speaker.

Fandom for us includes all aspects of being a fan, ranging from being a passive audience member to producing one’s own parafictive or interfictive creations.  Neomedia includes both new media as it is customarily defined as well as new ways of using and conceptualizing traditional media.

Ours is an interdisciplinary group, including historians, psychologists, geologists, writers, and independent scholars.  We welcome contributions from all disciplines and from all levels of academic achievement.  Submissions are welcome from professors, students, and independent researchers.  Topics may come from anime, manga, science fiction, television series, movies, radio, performing arts, or any other popular culture phenomenon and their respective fandom groups.

Abstracts of no more than 500 words must be submitted by 1 February 2013.  Please also include your CV.  Authors accepted for the conference will be notified by 1 March 2013.  Successful submissions to the conference will also be published in the July edition of The Phoenix Papers, our quarterly peer-reviewed journal.  If you wish to submit a paper for inclusion in the journal but not for conference consideration, the same requirements and deadlines apply.  Please indicate your preference in your submission email.  Because conference papers will be included in our journal, they must conform to our Style Guide.  Presentations will be 20 minutes long with 10 minutes for Q&A sessions.  The Sunday sessions will be given over to extended discussion on the three most popular topics from the Saturday presentations and a final “How Did We Do?” panel.

The FANS Conference is hosted and sponsored by A-Kon, the longest continually running anime and manga convention in North America.  It will be held at the Dallas Hilton Anatole Hotel.  Conference pre-registration is $60.  Pre-registration closes on 28 April 2013.  Pre-registration includes a full weekend pass to A-Kon 24, which will provide an excellent opportunity for in-person research into anime and manga fandoms.  On-site registration will also be available for $70.  All presenters must pre-register.  Information for the hotel and luncheon is being finalized as of this writing.

Please use our Contact Us page should you have any questions.  All submissions should be sent to fansconference@gmail.com.

Call for Papers: The 34th International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts

September 1, 2012

ICFA 34 will explore the ubiquity of adaptation in all its Fantastic forms. In addition to essays examining our Guests’ work, conference papers might consider specific adaptations, adaptation theory, translation, elision and interpolation, postmodern pastiche, transformation and metafictionality, plagiarism and homage, audience and adaptation, franchise fiction, or the recent resurgence of reboots, retcons, remakes, and reimaginings. Panels might discuss the intersection of fantasy and adaptation, the question of fidelity, the relationship between adaptive creation and target audiences, the impact of fan fiction, the popular reception of adapted classics, the perils of translation, or the challenges of adaptation and multiple media. If everything must adapt or die, then join us in Orlando and put off death for another year.

Guest of Honor: Neil Gaiman
Guest of Honor: Kij Johnson
Guest Scholar: Constance Penley

Submission Guidelines

We welcome paper proposals on all aspects of the fantastic, and especially encourage papers on the work of our special guests and attending authors. Paper proposals must consist of a 500-word proposal accompanied by an appropriate bibliography, and a 300-word abstract. Please send them to the appropriate Division Head below. See our website at www.iafa.org for information about how to propose panel sessions or participate in creative programming at the conference.

The deadline for submissions is October 31, 2012. Participants will be notified by

November 15, 2012, if they are accepted to the conference. Attendees may present only one paper at the conference and should not submit to multiple divisions. If you are uncertain as to which Division you should submit your proposal, please contact Sherryl Vint (sherryl.vint@gmail.com).

DIVISIONS

Children’s and Young Adult Literature and Art (CYA): Alaine Martaus <acmartaus@gmail.com>

Fantasy Literature (F): Stefan Ekman <stefan.ekman@englund.lu.se>

Film and Television (FTV): Kyle Bishop<BishopK@suu.edu>

Horror Literature (H): Rhonda Brock-Servais <brockservaisrl@longwood.edu>

International Fantastic (IF): Rachel Haywood Ferreira <rhaywoodferreira@gmail.com>

Science Fiction Literature (SF): David M. Higgins <dmhiggin@gmail.com>

Visual and Performing Arts and Audiences (VPAA): Isabella van Elferen <I.A.M.vanElferen@uu.nl>

CFP: Supernatural – Fan Phenomena

June 25, 2012

Now accepting abstracts for consideration for the new Supernatural (Fan Phenomena) title from Intellect Press. This will be part of the series of Fan Phenomena books, which aim to explore and decode the fascination we have with what constitutes an iconic or cultish phenomenon and how a particular person, TV show or film character/film infiltrates its way into the public consciousness.

The Supernatural (Fan Phenomena) title will look at particular examples of Supernatural fan culture and approach the subject in an accessible manner aimed at both fans and those interested in the cultural and social aspects of Supernatural and fan culture. The editors are particularly interested in exploring the rich dynamic that has developed between producers (actors, writers, directors, show runners) and consumers.

We invite papers that address the multiple ways in which the show speaks to its viewers. Topics could include (but are not limited to):

Supernatural as “cult” television
Fan culture dynamics/shipping the show
Aca-Fandom
Supernatural conventions
Gender/Sexuality in Supernatural
Gender/Sexuality in Supernatural fandom
Representations of fan culture in canon/fourth wall breaking
Fashion/cosplay/crafts
Fan Media/ (vidding, fanfic, fan art)
Cinematography, symbolism and visual dynamics of the show
Economics/Fan collecting
Virtual fan communities/online RPG’s
Influence/ Learning/Teaching through Supernatural
Philosophy/Religion in Supernatural
Characters/Characterization
Construction and representation of family in Supernatural
This book is aimed at both fans and those interested in the cultural and social aspects of Supernatural. The book is intended to be entertaining, informative, and generally jargon-free (or at least jargon-lite).

Please send an abstract (300 words) and CV or resume by 30 Aug 2012. Final chapters of 3000-3500 words will be due 01 Dec 2012. The final book will include ten chapters. Please direct all questions and submissions to Katherine Larsen klarsen@gwu.edu or Lynn Zubernis LZubernis@wcupa.edu.

CFP: Media, Fans, and The Sacred: Neoreligiosity Seeks Institution‏

June 7, 2012

The deadline for submissions for this issue is August 1st, 2012

Kinephanos’ fourth issue aims to explore the relationship between the sacred, the mythological motifs in modern popular fictions, and fandom. Our goal is to understand how the sacred, a pure human emotion, is disembodied from the ‘official’ religious institutions – at least in the Western countries – in order to be reinvested in secular cultural activities like ‘going to see a movie’ or ‘playing a video game’. Eliade wrote: “Movies, a ‘factory of dreams’, are highly inspired by countless mythological motifs, such as the struggle between the Hero and the Monster, battles and initiation ordeals, figures and exemplary patterns” (freely translated from *Le sacré et le profane*, 174). These mythological stories, highly symbolics, exist since ancient times. However, we would like to address the following issue: how the immersive experience in a work of fiction, now facilitated with various technological media forms (movies, videogames, television shows, etc.), changes our own relationship with the emotion of the sacred sparked in people’s life. We propose to identify this emotion with the term “neoreligiosity”. An English scholar of fan culture, Matt Hills, says in this regard: “Neoreligiosity implies that the proliferation of discourses of ‘cult’ within media fandom cannot be read as the ‘return’ of religion in a supposedly secularised culture” (*Fan Culture*, 2002, 119). Indeed, putting side by side the experience of the fan with the religious experience might seem appropriate. Due to a lack of words, needed by fans to describe their own affective experience with their favourite movies, the use of religious terminology seems logical, without calling upon religious institutions structure. Hills quotes Cavicchi: “(…) fans are aware of the parallels between religious devotion and their own devotion. At the very least, the discourse of religious conversion may provide fans with a model for describing the experience of becoming a fan” (2002, 118). This issue of Kinephanos proposes to explore how the sacred, the religiosity, and the neoreligiosity play out in modern popular fictions, and with those who experience it: the fans.

Possible topics include, but are not limited to;

– Sacred and reappropriation (fans creations : fanfics, fanfilms, etc.);
– Social network, sharing interests through Internet;
– Reception, modern and contemporary myths (Star Wars, Matrix, Lord of
the Rings, etc.);
– Cinema and religion, displacement of the sacred;
– Videogames, replayability as a tool of self-exploration (Mass Effect,
Heavy Rain, morality system, etc.);
– Revelation, epiphany, and the fan’s experience;
– Cinema and videogames, mythological motifs between the lines;
vestiges of the sacred;
– Repetition viewing as a ritual, ‘cult fandoms’ and television shows
(Star Trek, Doctor Who, etc.);
– Archetypal figures in the modern mythologies (Order and Chaos,
Lovecrafts’s Great Old Ones, the hero’s journey (monomyth) in Hollywood
movies, etc.).

While Kinephanos privileges publication of thematic issues, we strongly encourage writers to submit articles exceeding the theme which will be
published in each issue.

How to submit?

Abstracts of 1000 words including the title, the topic and the object(s) that will be studied. Please include bibliographical references, your name, email address and your primary field of study.

Send submissions (in French or English) by August 1st, 2012 to: mmarc.joly@umontreal.caail and vincent.mauger@arv.ulaval.ca

Following our approbation sent to you by email (2-3 weeks later after deadline), please send us your completed article by December 1st, 2012.

Editorial rules

Kinephanos is a peer-reviewed Web journal. Each article is evaluated by double-blind peer review. Kinephanos does not retain exclusive rights of published texts. However, material submitted must not have been previously published elsewhere. Future versions of the texts published in other periodicals must reference Kinephanos as its original source.

Production demands

All texts must be written in MLA style. 6,000 words maximum (excluding references but including endnotes) with 1.5 spacing, Times New Roman fonts 12pt, footnotes must be inserted manually in the text as follow : … (1), references must be within the text as follow (Jenkins 2000, 134), a bibliography with all your references, and 5 keywords at the end of the text.
For the editorial guidelines, refer to the section Editorial Guidelines http://www.kinephanos.ca/politique-editoriale/

Kinephanos accepts articles in French and in English

Kinephanos is a bilingual web-based journal. Focusing on questions involving cinema and popular media, Kinephanos encourages interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary research. The journal’s primary interests are movies and popular TV series, video games, emerging technologies and fan cultures. The preferred approaches include cinema studies, communication theories, religion sciences, philosophy, cultural studies and media studies.

CFP: Doctor Who: Fan Phenomena (Intellect)

May 22, 2012

Now accepting abstracts for consideration for the new Doctor Who (Fan Phenomena) title from Intellect Press. This will be part of the second series of Fan Phenomena books, which aim to explore and decode the fascination we have with what constitutes an iconic or cultish phenomenon and how a particular person, TV show or film character/film infiltrates their way into the public consciousness.

 

The Doctor Who (Fan Phenomena) title will look at particular examples of Doctor Who fan culture and approach the subject in an accessible manner aimed at both fans and those interested in the cultural and social aspects of Doctor Who and fan culture. The editor is particularly interested in exploring the changing characteristics of Doctor Who fandom, from scholars and fans alike, over the fifty-year history of the programme.

 

As such, we invite papers that address the nature of fandom, the unique attributes of Doctor Who fandom specifically, or the relationship between Doctor Who as a multi-generational text and its fans. Other topics could include (but are not limited to):

 

  • Fandom of specific Doctors
  • Changing norms of fandom
  • How one knows he/she is a fan
  • Aca-Fandom
  • The influence of other factors on Doctor Who fandom
  • Fandom of Doctor Who ancillary products, like the Big Finish audio or Virgin book titles
  • Specific fan practices (vidding, fanfic, cosplay, et al.)
  • Multi-generational fandom
  • Doctor Who conventions
  • Gender/Sexuality in Doctor Who fandom
  • New Who vs. Classic Who fandom
  • Fandom of Doctor Who DVD
  • Fan collecting
  • Learning through Doctor Who

 

This book is aimed at both fans and those interested in the cultural and social aspects of Doctor Who. The book is intended to be entertaining, informative, and generally jargon-free (or at least jargon-lite).

 

Abstracts should be 300 words long. Please also send a CV or resume with your abstract. Abstracts due 15 Aug 2012. Final chapters of 3000-3500 words will be due 01 Nov 2012. The final book will include ten chapters. Please direct all questions and submissions to Paul Booth, pbooth@depaul.edu.

CFP: Comics, Religion & Politics

May 15, 2012

http://www.lancs.ac.uk/fass/ppr/event/3960/

Date: 4th & 5th September 2012 Time: 9.00-18:00 pm

Venue: The Storey Institute, Meeting House Lane, Lancaster, LA1 1TH,

Alongside the continued popularity of political themes in comics recent years have also seen the rise of religious themes entering into the medium. The aim of this conference is to explore the relationship between comics, religion and politics in greater depth, to show how through the unique properties of the medium comics have the ability to be as thought-provoking as they are entertaining. The conference will examine the history and impact of religious and political themes, their relationship to audiences, and consider the future of such themes in all forms of sequential art narrative.

We invite papers that address religious and/or political themes in comic strips, comic books, graphic novels, or manga. Papers working at the interface of these two areas are particularly encouraged. Topics may include, but are not limited to:

  • Comics as social, religious, political text
  • Use of religious imagery and themes
  • Fan culture
  • Political cartoons and cartoonists
  • Gothic comics
  • Comics and magic
  • Representation of politics, religion, spirituality
  • Religious or political rhetoric of comics and their authors
  • Myths, legends, fables
  • Depiction of religious figures or politicians as comic characters
  • Comics and science fiction
  • Comics and propaganda
  • Comics and conspiracy theories
  • Representation of apocalypse, utopia, dystopia
  • Representation of war
  • Superheroes and religious, political identity
  • Theoretical approaches to the study of religion, politics in comics

Contributions are sought from researchers at any stage of their careers. Abstracts (300 words) for papers 20 minutes in length should be sent with a short biography to Emily Laycock (Department of Politics, Philosophy & Religion) at e.laycock@lancaster.ac.uk

Deadline for abstracts: 31st May 2012

Venue: The conference will be held at The Storey Institute.

Storey Creative Industries Centre, Meeting House Lane,Lancaster, LA1 1TH,

UK

http://www.thestorey.co.uk/

Details of registration: TBA

Keynote speakers:

Dr Will Brooker, Reader and Director of Research, Film and TV, Kingston University

Mike Carey, English writer (comics, novels, film scripts, and TV shows)

Dr Lincoln Geraghty, Reader in Popular Media Cultures, University of Portsmouth

Contact: e.laycock@lancaster.ac.uk

Who can attend: Anyone