Posts Tagged ‘Edited collection’

Call for Papers: Edited Collection on Glee, Gender, and Sexuality

March 16, 2012

The Fox television series Glee is nothing short of a phenomenon—hit show, sell-out concerts, extensive merchandising, chart-topping hits (eighth in digital sales), and a very passionate fandom. Glee is also simultaneously celebrated and disparaged for its tackling of timely cultural topics, such as bullying, coming out as gay or lesbian, and teen pregnancy. Much of this blurring of praise and derision centers on the program’s representations of gender and sexuality issues, like those previously mentioned.

This collection aims to illustrate how multiple fields of study inform, shape, challenge, and/or complicate gender and sexuality representations on Glee.

The varying types of diversity represented by the characters featured on Glee, as well as the ensemble cast portraying them, provides the opportunity to examine representations of gender and sexuality from multiple perspectives.

Possible disciplinary approaches include but are not limited to:

• Pedagogy
• Teacher education
• Music/music education
• LGBT/queer studies
• Feminist studies
• Fan studies
• Race/ethnicity
• New media fandoms
• Theater studies
• Disability studies

Submissions should include a proposed title, an abstract of no more than 500 words, and a short author biography. Please email the above to Michelle Parke at mparke@carrollcc.edu by May 15, 2012. Complete chapters manuscripts of 3,000-5,000 words will be due by August 15, 2012.

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CFP: The Adventures of Tintin

March 16, 2012

CFP: The Adventures of Tintin (essay collection)

Abstracts are now being accepted for possible inclusion in an anthology on “The Adventures of Tintin.” Proposed essay topics should creatively engage with the critical, philosophical, and social issues explored in the Tintin universe. Possible topics include, but are not limited to:

• Tintin and Hergé
• Tintin and comic book history
• Tintin and detective fiction
• Tintin and the adventure story
• Tintin in translation
• Censorship of Tintin
• Tintin’s spinoffs
• Tintin in adaptations
• Tintin in films
• Tintin clubs
• Tintin and geography
• Tintin and travel
• Travel and colonialism
• Treatment of race in Tintin
• Snowy as sidekick
• Animal welfare
• EcoTintin
• Tintin and gender
• Tintin and masculinity; homosocial relations
• Tintin in criticism

Submission Guidelines:
1. Submission deadline for abstracts (100-500 words) and a short biography(100-250 words): 30 April, 2012
2. Submission deadline for first drafts of accepted papers: 15 September 2012. 3. Submission deadline for final papers: 1 December 2012

Kindly submit abstracts (as Word Document attachment) to BOTH Tyler Shores (tyler.shores@gmail.com) and Tom Ue (ue_tom@hotmail.com).

Fan Phenomena: Twin Peaks

March 14, 2012

The editors of the forthcoming book “Fan Phenomena – Twin Peaks” (Intellect Press) are seeking contributions centered around the iconic cultural influence of David Lynch’s series “Twin Peaks”. Topics suggested by the publisher include: Fashion, Fan Media, Language, Economics, Virtual, Influence, Philosophies, Character/Characterization. The book will be composed of ten essays, 3,000-3,500 words each.

We are particularly interested in contributions that address the following topics:
Language – linguistic analysis of the show (general or specific i.e. specialized topics such as language in the use of diaries, dictation, etc.).

Fashion – a fashion history or textiles approach to analyzing the unique blend of 1950s-era fashion within the setting of the 1980s (general or focused on particular characters, i.e. Audrey Horn).

Characters – analysis of two “twin peaks”, Dale Cooper & Laura Palmer (duality), or character acting in “Twin Peaks”, women and gender in “Twin Peaks”, etc.

For editorial guidelines and more information, please e-mail the book’s co-editors: marisaATvideodansebourgogne.com & franckATvideodansebourgogne.com

To propose an essay, please send both editors a 200-300 word proposal and a CV, including a description of your previous written publications and areas of research, no later than March 18, 2012.

If selected for publication, the complete essay will need to be submitted by June 1, 2012.

Morrissey: Fandom, Representations and Identities – now in paperback

March 13, 2012

Price £15.95/USD20 Paperback

ISBN 978-1-84150-596-1

Published: March 19th  2012
Imprint: Intellect Books

Edited by Eoin Devereux and Aileen Dillane and Martin J. Power

Morrissey is one of the most influential songwriters of our time. As leader of The Smiths and as a solo-artiste, he has remained an anti-establishment and outspoken figure who has fought to bring controversial social issues to the forefront of our minds. Morrissey has used his music and his fame as vehicles for social change, singing and speaking out on a variety of issues: including class discrimination, ethnicity, alternative sexualities, vegetarianism and animal rights, delivering his message in velvet sound-bytes and typically provocative performances.

Morrissey: Fandom, Representations and Identities focuses exclusively on Morrissey’s solo career and provides a diverse collection of 18 essays that highlight his creative contribution to music and culture.  Working across a range of academic disciplines and approaches, these essays seek to make sense of the many complexities and controversies surrounding this iconic performer. Together, these essays examine the often intense fan cultures associated with Morrissey and how his creative work represents and performs many facets of the social world in which we find ourselves. Contributors to this book range from established academics to exciting emerging scholars in a range of fields and geographical locations, each of whom bring different perspectives on Morrissey and his work as an artist, a champion of the proletariat, and an elusive and contradictory stage personae.

Call for Contributors – Fan Phenomena: Marilyn Monroe

March 12, 2012

Intellect is currently seeking contributors for the Marilyn Monroe volume of Fan Phenomena. Fan Phenomena is a new book series prompted by a growing appetite for books that tap into the fascination we have with what constitutes an iconic or cultish phenomenon and how a particular person, TV show or film character/film infiltrates into the public consciousness. This series aims to ‘decode’ cult subjects in terms of the appeal and far reaching connections each of them have in becoming part of popular culture.

Papers are invited that discuss any aspect of Marilyn Monroe and Fandom. Abstracts of 300 words and a brief CV (maximum 1 page) ought to be emailed to me (see email addresses below) by April 1, 2012. Final chapters will be 3,000-3,500 words with a projected July 2012 deadline.

If you have questions or need more information about this project, please don’t hesitate to contact me.

Regards,
Marcelline
mblock@princeton.edu
marcelline@post.harvard.edu

Call for Contributors – Fan Phenomena: Batman

March 11, 2012

On the eve of Christopher Nolan’s trilogy-closer The Dark Knight Rises, Intellect is seeking contributors for Fan Phenomena: Batman. This new series, Fan Phenomena, is prompted by a growing appetite for books that tap into the fascination we have with what constitutes an iconic or cultish phenomenon and how a particular person, TV show or film character/film infiltrates their way into the public consciousness. The series will look at particular examples of ‘fan culture’ and approach the subject in an accessible manner aimed at both fans and those interested in the cultural and social aspects of these fascinating – and often unusual – ‘universes’.

Papers are invited that discuss any aspect of Batman and Fandom, including, but not limited to, the following:

FAN MEDIA

From widely distributed fan films such as Batman: Dead End to slash fiction that imagines Batman and Robin as more than just crime-fighting colleagues, fan responses to Batman frequently broaden the scope of the source material. Topics might include: fan art and fiction, fan films, mashups, machinima as well as issues surrounding authorship and copyright.

ADAPTATIONS and INFLUENCE

Although Batman may have his origin in comics, the Dark Knight has cast his shadow over a number of media and entertainments. Batman fans also migrate between media, often bringing their expectations and habits with them. Papers are invited which consider the interaction between Batman, adaptations and fans. Topics might include: Online fandom, Fan criticism of adaptations, viral marketing such as The Dark Knight, Comic-Conventions, Transmedia Storytelling and Convergence Culture.

FASHION

From Bat-Symbol emblazoned T-shirts to full on cosplay, Batman’s ionic status has inspired many fashion choices. Papers are invited which consider this relationship. Topics might include: Merchandise, Escapism, Fashion Trends and Cultural Impact of Style.

REPRESENTATIONS OF FANS

Papers are invited which discuss representations of “fans” in Batman texts such as the “Beware the Gray Ghost” episode of Batman: The Animated Series in which Bruce Wayne meets his childhood icon, or The Dark Knight in which Batman inspires like-minded vigilantes.

ECONOMICS AND POPULARITY

Despite occasional dips in popularity, Batman has been an important force in popular culture for over seventy years. Papers are invited which consider the role fans have played in sustaining the hero’s recognition.

Please submit abstracts of no more than 300 words, an academic bio and contact details (either in the body of a mail or as a single attachment) to Liam Burke atliam.burke@nuigalway.ie by 12 March 2012. Final papers will be 3,000 – 3,500 words and will be need to be submitted no later than 31 May 2012.

Edited Collection on Sherlock Holmes Adaptations

March 5, 2012

Arthur Conan Doyle’s Sherlock Holmes stories have recently gained new popularity through a variety of adaptations and re-interpretations in a broad variety of media forms. This edited collection will focus on three ways to access these texts: Fan and audience activity, adaptations throughout history and their political and ideological contextualization, and intertextual influences. We welcome submissions for articles of 200 word abstracts on adaptations of Sherlock Holmes. Possible topics include, but are not limited to:

– Adaptation in film, television, theatre/performance, graphic novels, games, and other media forms
– Fan activity surrounding all texts, including fan fiction, slash fiction, shipping, online fandom, etc.
– Reception of adaptations
– Historical adaptations
– Influences on other franchises, such as the CSI franchise or The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen graphic novel series, or literary influences, such as Patricia Cornwell’s Kay Scarpetta series
– Games adaptation from board games to contemporary video gaming
– Adaptation in varying political contexts and systems
– Influences on the genre

Please submit 200 word abstracts by the 2nd of April to Stephanie Jones (sbj@aber.ac.uk), Nia Edwards-Behi (nne09@aber.ac.uk) and Mareike Jenner (mmj09@aber.ac.uk)

New book series from Intellect – Fan Phenomena

March 3, 2012

This new series is prompted by a growing appetite for books that tap into the fascination we have with what constitutes an iconic or cultish phenomenon and how a particular person, TV show or film character/film infiltrates their way into the public consciousness. We will look at particular examples of ‘fan culture’ and approach the subject in an accessible manner aimed at both fans and those interested in the cultural and social aspects of these fascinating – and often unusual – ‘universes’.

The concept of the book series is to address cult/fan culture within a specified gaze. Topics will range from mythic actors like Marilyn Monroe and James Dean to the long-lasting television series Buffy The Vampire Slayer to film juggernauts like Harry Potter, James Bond and Star Wars.

Each of the subjects we choose have massive visual appeal as they deal with fan fashion, memorabilia, (fan)homages, merchandising and branding that help to create the immersive world that extends beyond the phenomenon itself. The books will aim to exploit this visual aspect to align them with other Intellect book series such as the World Film Locations and Directory of World Cinema series that make good use of relevant collected imagery.

The series aims to ‘decode’ cult subjects in terms of the appeal and far reaching connections each of them have in becoming part of popular culture. We are fully aware that these are not meant to be comprehensive, weighty tomes on the subject – rather a series of ‘handy’ books that each include a fascinating collection of essays which explore a particular area or aspect of the subject’s ‘universe’ in each chapter.
Chapter headings include:

–    Fashion (Cosplay, high street fashion trends)
–    Language (eg. Slang, parlance, dialect;  words and phrases particular to each ‘phenomenon’)
–    Character/characterization
–    Fan Media (fan fiction, art, fan films)
–    The virtual (videogames, fan-films, role-play, blogs, fan forums)
–    Philosophies (cod-religions that have evolved from the source phenomena)
–    Economics (merchandise, branding, memorabilia)

A short list of proposed titles for the series include:

–    Buffy the Vampire Slayer / Star Trek / X-Files / James Bond / Harry Potter / Star Wars / Dr. Who / The Big Lebowski / Sherlock Holmes / Marilyn Monroe / Rocky Horror Picture Show / Lord of the Rings / The Matrix / Zombies / James Dean / Quentin Tarantino / Anime / Batman / Superman / Jane Austen / Disney

If you would like to contribute to any of the titles in the above list (or have suggestions of your own), are interested in an editorial role or are simply looking for further information about the book series, please send an email to Gabriel Solomons – series editor.

Fan CULTure: An Examination of Participatory Fandom in the 21st Century

March 3, 2012

With the advent of new media technologies and social networking sites making communication faster and easier than ever, there exists a dearth of opportunity to see how fan cultures have evolved as a result. For example, fans can now have a direct impact on how some of their favorite TV shows are made and have influenced the storylines taking place. This type of “participatory” fandom has reached new heights in the 21st century as fans and creators become better connected. With this in mind, Dr. Kristin M. Barton and Dr. Jonathan M. Lampley are seeking proposals for an edited volume under consideration at McFarland titled Fan CULTure: An Examination of Participatory Fandom in the 21st Century. The question this volume will seek to address is: How are fans interacting with or participating in cultures associated with popular culture objects? Proposals should look at specific properties (media or non-media) and how fan culture intersects with them using new or modern techniques. Each essay will ideally focus on a different media vehicle or object. We expect to have essays that focus on some (if not all) of the following topics: Star Trek, Star Wars, Dr. Who, Lord of the Rings, Joss Whedon’s creations, Game of Thrones, the Harry Potter franchise, and LEGOs, among others. Possible topics to explore with regard to these properties include (but are not limited to):
– Fan fiction
– Incorporating fans in DVD production/distribution/release
– Use of social media
– Fan involvement in helping create/steer storylines
– Fan films/Fan trailers/“Sweding”
– Theme parks/rides
– “Shipping” (fan fictionalization of characters in existing TV/film series)
– Fan participation within a property (fans as zombies in The Walking Dead)
– Costuming (Star Wars’ 501st Legion)
– Fan activism (Lady Gaga’s “Little Monsters” rallying for gay rights)

Again, the focus of the essays should be how these have been adopted into fan culture within a 21st century context.

The editors invite articles (5,000-6,000 words) that respond to the focus of the volume. Article abstracts (300-400 words) and a brief CV should be submitted by May 15, 2012 to Dr. Jonathan Lampley at jlampley@daltonstate.edu. Submissions with detailed outlines or in draft form will be given stronger consideration. Completed essays must be submitted by November 15, 2012. Brief queries are welcome should there be questions about appropriate submission topics. Selected authors will be notified by the end of May 2012, and please note that invitation to submit a full essay does not guarantee inclusion in the volume.