Posts Tagged ‘Edited collection’

CFP: Edited volume for Bloomsbury Series in Asian Celebrity and Fandom Studies

December 16, 2022

CFP: ‘Star and Celebrity Branding within Asia: Using Comradery Capital’ edited volume for Bloomsbury Series in Asian Celebrity and Fandom Studies

Editors: Jackie Raphael and Celia Lam

Call for chapters
The centrality of the celebrity commodity to the flow of cultural and economic capital in mediascapes has been explored by scholars such as Driessens and Marshall who note that celebrities are “manufactured by the celebrity industry” (Driessens, 2012, p. 643), and a mechanism to sell products. Marshall notes that the “celebrity as public individual who participates openly as a marketable commodity serves as a powerful type of legitimation of the political economic model of exchange and value – the basis of capitalism – and extends that model to include the individual (2014 [1997], p. xlviii).

In a recent publication, Celebrity Bromances (Routledge, 2022), we engage with the notion of the celebrity commodity, expanding Driessens’ celebrity capital to the dynamics of celebrity relationships. Driessens outlines how celebrities become part of the currency in a commodity culture, amassing capital that can be traded for profit to the benefit of the celebrity or affiliated products. Celebrities are therefore seen as cultural commodities (Marshall, 2014; Driessens, 2012, 2013); products of culture that contain value which can be traded for economic capital.

The commodification of celebrity interactions is a lens through which celebrity bromances are explored. We suggest that a “bromance capital” operates in contemporary celebrity culture, wherein the bromance is not only used as a tool to draw attention to individual celebrity figures. It also becomes a cultural “product” which gains value as a consequence of the affective attachments it provokes. Expanding the discussion beyond male homosocial intimacy, we also propose the concept of comradery capital, which is inclusive of group dynamics and functions across genders. Comradery capital refers to inherent value of the presentation of celebrity friendships and how these are utilised for the promotion of movies, television shows, charities, and products. The capital can fluctuate depending on levels of authenticity and how the relationship is performed.

While Celebrity Bromances explored some examples of comradery capital, these examples originated mostly from Hollywood celebrity culture. In our efforts to explore the operation of comradery capital, we wish to examine the various readings of comradery capital across countries in Asia. For example, The Avengers cast promotes their dynamic and films in interviews across Asian countries. Similarly, the way Gal Gadot and Chris Pine perform their friendship in the promotion of the Wonder Woman films or Chris Hemsworth and Tessa Thompson for Men In Black International.

We would like to capture cultures from around Asia including Japan, Korea, Dubai, Lebanon, India, China, Iran, Singapore, Pakistan, Malaysia, Israel and Indonesia. In examining the way comradery capital is performed and perceived in these various regions, the book would be able to capture the way in which celebrities vary their performances of friendship to take into account cultural differences of acceptable physical contact, understanding of language and slang, and the reading of sexuality and gender. It will also examine how comradery capital is a global promotional tool, breaking the barriers of communication.

We welcome contributions that focus on the political economy of comradery capital, as well as the affective/empowering dimensions of comradery capital, including fan and consumer relations.

We encourage interested authors to review definitions of bromance and comradery capital in Celebrity Bromances by accessing the open access chapters at the below links. We encourage an engagement with these concepts in abstracts submitted.

Chapter 4 – ‘Utilising’ Bromances<https://emea01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.taylorfrancis.com%2Fchapters%2Foa-mono%2F10.4324%2F9781003093329-4%2Futilising-bromances-celia-lam-jackie-raphael%3Fcontext%3Dubx&data=05%7C01%7C%7C5c7a858a51014954e98008dadf4891f8%7C84df9e7fe9f640afb435aaaaaaaaaaaa%7C1%7C0%7C638067800052913989%7CUnknown%7CTWFpbGZsb3d8eyJWIjoiMC4wLjAwMDAiLCJQIjoiV2luMzIiLCJBTiI6Ik1haWwiLCJXVCI6Mn0%3D%7C3000%7C%7C%7C&sdata=xqIIXx%2FP%2FRm4LqPSE6fIeuLBGsklVF8RXUdDVzVfubQ%3D&reserved=0>

Chapter 5 – Beyond Bromances<https://emea01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.taylorfrancis.com%2Fchapters%2Foa-mono%2F10.4324%2F9781003093329-5%2Fbeyond-bromances-celia-lam-jackie-raphael%3Fcontext%3Dubx&data=05%7C01%7C%7C5c7a858a51014954e98008dadf4891f8%7C84df9e7fe9f640afb435aaaaaaaaaaaa%7C1%7C0%7C638067800052913989%7CUnknown%7CTWFpbGZsb3d8eyJWIjoiMC4wLjAwMDAiLCJQIjoiV2luMzIiLCJBTiI6Ik1haWwiLCJXVCI6Mn0%3D%7C3000%7C%7C%7C&sdata=SsEeWFN%2B%2FwF6gSd7JZAo05FlKavhV%2BPziTUVDKSFFUY%3D&reserved=0>

Topics could include, but are not limited to:

·      Promotion of Hollywood films in Asian contexts

·      Reception of Hollywood cast dynamics in Asian contexts

·      The creation and presentation of cast dynamics in Asian contexts, including same and mixed gender (binary and non-binary) casts

·      The reception of regional cast dynamics in Asian contexts

·      Creation and reception of joint or group celebrity persona

Submission
Please send the following to the editors at: cjcelebrityresearch@gmail.com<mailto:cjcelebrityresearch@gmail.com> by April 1, 2023:

–       300-word abstract

–       100-word bio

–       5-6 key words

Contact: cjcelebrityresearch@gmail.com<mailto:cjcelebrityresearch@gmail.com>.

Anticipated timeline:
Abstract submission deadline: April 1, 2023
Submission of full proposal to Bloomsbury: July 1, 2023

If the proposal is accepted, full chapters would be expected by November 2023.

References
Driessen, O. (2012). The celebritization of society and culture: Understanding the structural dynamics of celebrity culture. International Journal of Cultural Studies, 16(6), 641–657. https://emea01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fdoi.org%2F10.1177%2F1367877912459140&data=05%7C01%7C%7C5c7a858a51014954e98008dadf4891f8%7C84df9e7fe9f640afb435aaaaaaaaaaaa%7C1%7C0%7C638067800052913989%7CUnknown%7CTWFpbGZsb3d8eyJWIjoiMC4wLjAwMDAiLCJQIjoiV2luMzIiLCJBTiI6Ik1haWwiLCJXVCI6Mn0%3D%7C3000%7C%7C%7C&sdata=sTi07KNaNTZixgWHlQmmTfwBZBQFVRXKUDN5ETjVKhU%3D&reserved=0.

Driessens, O. (2013). Celebrity capital: Redefining celebrity using field theory. Theory
and Society, 42(5), 543–560.

Marshall, P. D. (1997, 2014). Celebrity and power: Fame in contemporary culture. University of Minnesota Press.

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Explaining Isekai – Call for Contributions

December 7, 2022

This book anthology will provide a compilation of various themes that are within the broad scope of the Isekai genre. Starting with an introduction and a historic overview of the recently very popular anime and manga genre, the different chapters will deal with specific aspects in the field of film and visual culture, religious studies as well as possible effects on the militarization of societies. Authors can cover the thematic issues of gender representations, violence, the representation of state and religion, the military, and the societal aspect of transgressing to another world. Hence the aim of this book is to be a valuable source for all those who are willing to look behind the scenes of Isekai and other worlds, unraveling the mysteries, impacts, and social functions of this popular genre.

Topics may include but are not limited to:

  • History of Japanese Isekai novels, manga and anime
  • The evolution of Isekai and it’s rise in popularity
  • Gender aspects, Gender Swap, Gender Based Violence, Gender Role Models, Isekai Harem
  • Religious aspects , The image of religion in Isekai
  • Violence and the military in Isekai
  • Unique features in Isekai
  • Societal aspects of Isekai
  • Case studies of a specific Isekai series/novels

Final submissions should be between 5000 and 7000 words (including bibliography and reference). If you have additional suggestions or topics that you would like to contribute, please feel free to email them. As this anthology understands itself as interdisciplinary, proposals from Japanese Studies, Cultural and Film Studies as well as from Popular Culture and the Social Sciences including Humanities are welcomed.

Submission details

Please send your proposal, approximately 200 to 400 words, covering the topic and methodology used before 20th January 2023 to the editor. Please also provide a short academic bio of around 100 words.

Your work should be original and currently not submitted to another publisher or Journal.

Decisions will be communicated in February 2023. Chapter manuscripts are expected to be submitted in August 2023. A detailed guideline (citation, spelling, chapter structure of the book) will be communicated together with the decisions.

Contact Info: 

Proposals and any inquiries should be sent to the editor’s email:

Dr. Cserkits Michael (independent post-doc scholar; University of Vienna/Austria)

a1049671@unet.univie.ac.at (Academic email); and please cc to explainingisekai@gmx.at (Project email)

Routledge Companion to Media Fandom, 2nd edition Call for Chapters on Transcultural Fandom

November 1, 2022

Routledge Companion to Media Fandom, 2nd edition Call for Chapters on Transcultural Fandom

Work has begun on a second edition of The Routledge Companion to Media Fandom, a 40+ chapter collection that provides reflection on and direction for the evolving field of Fan Studies edited by Suzanne Scott and Melissa Click. The project’s goal is to bring together an internationally and interdisciplinarily diverse group of established and emerging media fandom scholars to survey core concerns, evaluate the state of the field, and point to new directions of inquiry. The project will be organized into five main sections: Methods & Ethics, Fan Practices & Platforms, Identities, Transcultural Fandom, and Industry & Labor.

We are looking for new chapters for the collection’s section on Transcultural Fandom. In the Routledge Companion to Media Fandom’s first edition, the co-editors argued that “The absence of a robust dialogue in fan studies scholarship about race and transcultural fandom is one of the field’s most obvious deficiencies” (p. 241). Thus, we agree with Chin and Morimoto’s (2013) call for more work on transcultural fans and assertion that “… non-English (often non-Western) fandoms are not peripheral to ‘mainstream’ fan culture. Rather they are part of the transcultural interplay of fandom as much as any other, separated only by barriers of language, distribution and availability that have become eminently surmountable as fandoms have migrated online” (p. 105).

To continue to broaden our knowledge of the complex ways media fandom develops across cultures and national borders, we are seeking abstracts for the collection’s second edition section on Transcultural Fandom. We are particularly interested in media and fandoms that develop in or evolve from the Global South.


Submission Instructions:

Please submit a 500-word abstract and a CV by December 15, 2022 to the co-editors at click@gonzaga.edu and suzanne.scott@texas.edu. Please include both co-editors on your email submission.

Authors whose abstracts are selected will be notified by January 15, 2023 and asked to submit the first draft of their full (5000-word) chapter by August 1, 2023. Final chapter drafts will be due May 1, 2024.


References:

Chin, B. and Morimoto, L. H. (2013). “Towards a theory of transcultural fandom,” Participations, 10, pp. 92-108.

Click, M. A. and Scott, S. (2018). “Race and transcultural fandom: introduction,” The Routledge Companion to Media Fandom, pp. 241-243.

CFP: Participatory Culture Wars: Controversy, Conflict and Complicity in Fandom 

May 7, 2021

***Call for papers and contributions for an edited collection*** 

Participatory Culture Wars: Controversy, Conflict and Complicity in Fandom 

Edited by Dr Simone Driessen, Bethan Jones, Dr Benjamin Litherland. 

It has become increasingly clear that fandoms and participatory culture are sites of controversy, conflict and even complicity, complicating earlier assessments that sought to celebrate creativity, collegiality, and community. As we continue to make sense of the consequences of web 2.0, the study of fans – the affective bonds, identities, and productive cultures of a highly mediated and networked society – is vital in understanding our current moment, whether expressed in debates about “cancel culture” or ongoing “culture wars”. Fans have had to rethink and reassess their relationships to fan objects, consider their role in reproducing global systems of inequality, and reflect on the meaning of participation in an era that is marked by both moral ambivalence and political earnestness.  

Implicitly and explicitly, fannish practices are involved in a variety of key social, political, and cultural issues across the globe. They can be seen in politics, ranging from QAnon’s role in the storming of the US Capitol building, conspiracy theories relating to the covid pandemic, and the continued expansion of the global reactionary and populist right, from Britain to India to Brazil. They can be seen in new cultural terrains produced by networked movements like #MeToo, Black Lives Matter, #OscarsSoWhite, and the accompanying activism and responses as fans come to terms with the crimes, misdemeanors, and disagreements of former faves, like Xiao Zhan, Joss Whedon, or JK Rowling. They are expressed in the strategies and tactics of inter- and intra-fandom conflicts, whether Meghan Markle and the Royal Family or some Chinese fan responses to BTS talking about the Korean war. And, pressingly, fan tourism, collector culture, and the energy use of digital culture all contribute to the ongoing climate crisis.  

Scholars of participatory culture can play a key role in assessing many and more of these issues, but they will also have significant and ongoing impact on the way we conceptualize fans, fandoms, and participatory culture. This work builds on developing themes in the field. Ongoing scholarship about racism, sexism, and homophobia in prominent fan spaces is vital (Massanari, 2017; Pande, 2020; Scott, 2019), and Jonathan Gray’s conception of anti-fandom (2003; 2005; 2007) is an important moment in indicating the darker underbelly of fan cultures. Yet scholarship on QAnon and Trump fandom (Reinhardt, forthcoming; Miller, 2020), cancel and commenting culture (Clark, 2020; Ng, 2020; Barnes, 2018), reactionary fandom (Stanfill, 2020), ethical consumption (Wood, Litherland & Reed, 2020; Tyler, 2021) and serial killer fandom (Nacos, 2015; Rico, 2015) pose important questions which cannot be answered simply by reference to anti- or toxic fandom.  

This collection brings together some of these authors and perspectives while developing and extending these debates. We are keen to broaden the scope of the issue so that studies of fans of film and television are included alongside studies of music, literary, theatre, sports and politics. And we are especially eager to include case studies beyond the anglophone and global north. We are also interested in the practices of organizations in fan-adjacent areas such as marketing, production, branding and influencer culture. We welcome traditional essays and research papers and non-traditional formats, such as roundtables, interviews, and think-pieces, from people inside and outside of the academy. Topics might include but are not limited to: 

·        Conspiracy theories and/as fandom. 

·        ‘Culture wars’, intra- and inter-fan conflicts, and other broader disagreements or discontent about the meaning and values of popular cultural texts.  

·        The consequences of anti-fandom and toxic fandom. 

·        Expressions and practices of ethical consumption, whether via “cancel culture”, commodity activism or similar. 

·        The moral economies of fandom, and their consequences for the media and cultural industries. 

·        The ethical implications of participation, whether through fan activism, dark fandom or other. 

·        The environmental impact of fandom, from NFTs to fan tourism. 

 
Please send an abstract of 300 words, along with a short author biography of 150 words to participatoryculturewars@gmail.com by 31 July 2021. Please also address any queries to this email address. 

Call for Papers: Edited Collection on Glee, Gender, and Sexuality

March 16, 2012

The Fox television series Glee is nothing short of a phenomenon—hit show, sell-out concerts, extensive merchandising, chart-topping hits (eighth in digital sales), and a very passionate fandom. Glee is also simultaneously celebrated and disparaged for its tackling of timely cultural topics, such as bullying, coming out as gay or lesbian, and teen pregnancy. Much of this blurring of praise and derision centers on the program’s representations of gender and sexuality issues, like those previously mentioned.

This collection aims to illustrate how multiple fields of study inform, shape, challenge, and/or complicate gender and sexuality representations on Glee.

The varying types of diversity represented by the characters featured on Glee, as well as the ensemble cast portraying them, provides the opportunity to examine representations of gender and sexuality from multiple perspectives.

Possible disciplinary approaches include but are not limited to:

• Pedagogy
• Teacher education
• Music/music education
• LGBT/queer studies
• Feminist studies
• Fan studies
• Race/ethnicity
• New media fandoms
• Theater studies
• Disability studies

Submissions should include a proposed title, an abstract of no more than 500 words, and a short author biography. Please email the above to Michelle Parke at mparke@carrollcc.edu by May 15, 2012. Complete chapters manuscripts of 3,000-5,000 words will be due by August 15, 2012.

CFP: The Adventures of Tintin

March 16, 2012

CFP: The Adventures of Tintin (essay collection)

Abstracts are now being accepted for possible inclusion in an anthology on “The Adventures of Tintin.” Proposed essay topics should creatively engage with the critical, philosophical, and social issues explored in the Tintin universe. Possible topics include, but are not limited to:

• Tintin and Hergé
• Tintin and comic book history
• Tintin and detective fiction
• Tintin and the adventure story
• Tintin in translation
• Censorship of Tintin
• Tintin’s spinoffs
• Tintin in adaptations
• Tintin in films
• Tintin clubs
• Tintin and geography
• Tintin and travel
• Travel and colonialism
• Treatment of race in Tintin
• Snowy as sidekick
• Animal welfare
• EcoTintin
• Tintin and gender
• Tintin and masculinity; homosocial relations
• Tintin in criticism

Submission Guidelines:
1. Submission deadline for abstracts (100-500 words) and a short biography(100-250 words): 30 April, 2012
2. Submission deadline for first drafts of accepted papers: 15 September 2012. 3. Submission deadline for final papers: 1 December 2012

Kindly submit abstracts (as Word Document attachment) to BOTH Tyler Shores (tyler.shores@gmail.com) and Tom Ue (ue_tom@hotmail.com).

Fan Phenomena: Twin Peaks

March 14, 2012

The editors of the forthcoming book “Fan Phenomena – Twin Peaks” (Intellect Press) are seeking contributions centered around the iconic cultural influence of David Lynch’s series “Twin Peaks”. Topics suggested by the publisher include: Fashion, Fan Media, Language, Economics, Virtual, Influence, Philosophies, Character/Characterization. The book will be composed of ten essays, 3,000-3,500 words each.

We are particularly interested in contributions that address the following topics:
Language – linguistic analysis of the show (general or specific i.e. specialized topics such as language in the use of diaries, dictation, etc.).

Fashion – a fashion history or textiles approach to analyzing the unique blend of 1950s-era fashion within the setting of the 1980s (general or focused on particular characters, i.e. Audrey Horn).

Characters – analysis of two “twin peaks”, Dale Cooper & Laura Palmer (duality), or character acting in “Twin Peaks”, women and gender in “Twin Peaks”, etc.

For editorial guidelines and more information, please e-mail the book’s co-editors: marisaATvideodansebourgogne.com & franckATvideodansebourgogne.com

To propose an essay, please send both editors a 200-300 word proposal and a CV, including a description of your previous written publications and areas of research, no later than March 18, 2012.

If selected for publication, the complete essay will need to be submitted by June 1, 2012.

Morrissey: Fandom, Representations and Identities – now in paperback

March 13, 2012

Price £15.95/USD20 Paperback

ISBN 978-1-84150-596-1

Published: March 19th  2012
Imprint: Intellect Books

Edited by Eoin Devereux and Aileen Dillane and Martin J. Power

Morrissey is one of the most influential songwriters of our time. As leader of The Smiths and as a solo-artiste, he has remained an anti-establishment and outspoken figure who has fought to bring controversial social issues to the forefront of our minds. Morrissey has used his music and his fame as vehicles for social change, singing and speaking out on a variety of issues: including class discrimination, ethnicity, alternative sexualities, vegetarianism and animal rights, delivering his message in velvet sound-bytes and typically provocative performances.

Morrissey: Fandom, Representations and Identities focuses exclusively on Morrissey’s solo career and provides a diverse collection of 18 essays that highlight his creative contribution to music and culture.  Working across a range of academic disciplines and approaches, these essays seek to make sense of the many complexities and controversies surrounding this iconic performer. Together, these essays examine the often intense fan cultures associated with Morrissey and how his creative work represents and performs many facets of the social world in which we find ourselves. Contributors to this book range from established academics to exciting emerging scholars in a range of fields and geographical locations, each of whom bring different perspectives on Morrissey and his work as an artist, a champion of the proletariat, and an elusive and contradictory stage personae.

Call for Contributors – Fan Phenomena: Marilyn Monroe

March 12, 2012

Intellect is currently seeking contributors for the Marilyn Monroe volume of Fan Phenomena. Fan Phenomena is a new book series prompted by a growing appetite for books that tap into the fascination we have with what constitutes an iconic or cultish phenomenon and how a particular person, TV show or film character/film infiltrates into the public consciousness. This series aims to ‘decode’ cult subjects in terms of the appeal and far reaching connections each of them have in becoming part of popular culture.

Papers are invited that discuss any aspect of Marilyn Monroe and Fandom. Abstracts of 300 words and a brief CV (maximum 1 page) ought to be emailed to me (see email addresses below) by April 1, 2012. Final chapters will be 3,000-3,500 words with a projected July 2012 deadline.

If you have questions or need more information about this project, please don’t hesitate to contact me.

Regards,
Marcelline
mblock@princeton.edu
marcelline@post.harvard.edu

Call for Contributors – Fan Phenomena: Batman

March 11, 2012

On the eve of Christopher Nolan’s trilogy-closer The Dark Knight Rises, Intellect is seeking contributors for Fan Phenomena: Batman. This new series, Fan Phenomena, is prompted by a growing appetite for books that tap into the fascination we have with what constitutes an iconic or cultish phenomenon and how a particular person, TV show or film character/film infiltrates their way into the public consciousness. The series will look at particular examples of ‘fan culture’ and approach the subject in an accessible manner aimed at both fans and those interested in the cultural and social aspects of these fascinating – and often unusual – ‘universes’.

Papers are invited that discuss any aspect of Batman and Fandom, including, but not limited to, the following:

FAN MEDIA

From widely distributed fan films such as Batman: Dead End to slash fiction that imagines Batman and Robin as more than just crime-fighting colleagues, fan responses to Batman frequently broaden the scope of the source material. Topics might include: fan art and fiction, fan films, mashups, machinima as well as issues surrounding authorship and copyright.

ADAPTATIONS and INFLUENCE

Although Batman may have his origin in comics, the Dark Knight has cast his shadow over a number of media and entertainments. Batman fans also migrate between media, often bringing their expectations and habits with them. Papers are invited which consider the interaction between Batman, adaptations and fans. Topics might include: Online fandom, Fan criticism of adaptations, viral marketing such as The Dark Knight, Comic-Conventions, Transmedia Storytelling and Convergence Culture.

FASHION

From Bat-Symbol emblazoned T-shirts to full on cosplay, Batman’s ionic status has inspired many fashion choices. Papers are invited which consider this relationship. Topics might include: Merchandise, Escapism, Fashion Trends and Cultural Impact of Style.

REPRESENTATIONS OF FANS

Papers are invited which discuss representations of “fans” in Batman texts such as the “Beware the Gray Ghost” episode of Batman: The Animated Series in which Bruce Wayne meets his childhood icon, or The Dark Knight in which Batman inspires like-minded vigilantes.

ECONOMICS AND POPULARITY

Despite occasional dips in popularity, Batman has been an important force in popular culture for over seventy years. Papers are invited which consider the role fans have played in sustaining the hero’s recognition.

Please submit abstracts of no more than 300 words, an academic bio and contact details (either in the body of a mail or as a single attachment) to Liam Burke atliam.burke@nuigalway.ie by 12 March 2012. Final papers will be 3,000 – 3,500 words and will be need to be submitted no later than 31 May 2012.