Author Archive

CFP: Participatory Culture Wars: Controversy, Conflict and Complicity in Fandom 

May 7, 2021

***Call for papers and contributions for an edited collection*** 

Participatory Culture Wars: Controversy, Conflict and Complicity in Fandom 

Edited by Dr Simone Driessen, Bethan Jones, Dr Benjamin Litherland. 

It has become increasingly clear that fandoms and participatory culture are sites of controversy, conflict and even complicity, complicating earlier assessments that sought to celebrate creativity, collegiality, and community. As we continue to make sense of the consequences of web 2.0, the study of fans – the affective bonds, identities, and productive cultures of a highly mediated and networked society – is vital in understanding our current moment, whether expressed in debates about “cancel culture” or ongoing “culture wars”. Fans have had to rethink and reassess their relationships to fan objects, consider their role in reproducing global systems of inequality, and reflect on the meaning of participation in an era that is marked by both moral ambivalence and political earnestness.  

Implicitly and explicitly, fannish practices are involved in a variety of key social, political, and cultural issues across the globe. They can be seen in politics, ranging from QAnon’s role in the storming of the US Capitol building, conspiracy theories relating to the covid pandemic, and the continued expansion of the global reactionary and populist right, from Britain to India to Brazil. They can be seen in new cultural terrains produced by networked movements like #MeToo, Black Lives Matter, #OscarsSoWhite, and the accompanying activism and responses as fans come to terms with the crimes, misdemeanors, and disagreements of former faves, like Xiao Zhan, Joss Whedon, or JK Rowling. They are expressed in the strategies and tactics of inter- and intra-fandom conflicts, whether Meghan Markle and the Royal Family or some Chinese fan responses to BTS talking about the Korean war. And, pressingly, fan tourism, collector culture, and the energy use of digital culture all contribute to the ongoing climate crisis.  

Scholars of participatory culture can play a key role in assessing many and more of these issues, but they will also have significant and ongoing impact on the way we conceptualize fans, fandoms, and participatory culture. This work builds on developing themes in the field. Ongoing scholarship about racism, sexism, and homophobia in prominent fan spaces is vital (Massanari, 2017; Pande, 2020; Scott, 2019), and Jonathan Gray’s conception of anti-fandom (2003; 2005; 2007) is an important moment in indicating the darker underbelly of fan cultures. Yet scholarship on QAnon and Trump fandom (Reinhardt, forthcoming; Miller, 2020), cancel and commenting culture (Clark, 2020; Ng, 2020; Barnes, 2018), reactionary fandom (Stanfill, 2020), ethical consumption (Wood, Litherland & Reed, 2020; Tyler, 2021) and serial killer fandom (Nacos, 2015; Rico, 2015) pose important questions which cannot be answered simply by reference to anti- or toxic fandom.  

This collection brings together some of these authors and perspectives while developing and extending these debates. We are keen to broaden the scope of the issue so that studies of fans of film and television are included alongside studies of music, literary, theatre, sports and politics. And we are especially eager to include case studies beyond the anglophone and global north. We are also interested in the practices of organizations in fan-adjacent areas such as marketing, production, branding and influencer culture. We welcome traditional essays and research papers and non-traditional formats, such as roundtables, interviews, and think-pieces, from people inside and outside of the academy. Topics might include but are not limited to: 

·        Conspiracy theories and/as fandom. 

·        ‘Culture wars’, intra- and inter-fan conflicts, and other broader disagreements or discontent about the meaning and values of popular cultural texts.  

·        The consequences of anti-fandom and toxic fandom. 

·        Expressions and practices of ethical consumption, whether via “cancel culture”, commodity activism or similar. 

·        The moral economies of fandom, and their consequences for the media and cultural industries. 

·        The ethical implications of participation, whether through fan activism, dark fandom or other. 

·        The environmental impact of fandom, from NFTs to fan tourism. 

 
Please send an abstract of 300 words, along with a short author biography of 150 words to participatoryculturewars@gmail.com by 31 July 2021. Please also address any queries to this email address. 

CFP:  Nightmare Before Christmas (Key Films/Filmmakers in Animation series, Bloomsbury) 

January 28, 2021

This edited collection will consider Nightmare Before Christmas as a milestone in animation and film history as well as a key cultural object with lasting impact. The book will be inserted in Bloomsbury’s Key Film/Filmmakers in Animation series. 

In the thirty years since its release, Nightmare Before Christmas has drawn repeated academic attention. Many of these contributions have seen the film as an entry point to larger arguments about Tim Burton’s work, whether in terms of its animation (Cuthill 2017), representations of gender (Mitchell 2017), and use of fairy tales (Burger 2017). Less often, Nightmare Before Christmas has been considered in relation to other frameworks, such as its presence beyond the film industry, in theme parks (Williams 2020a, 2020b), and the way it negotiated changing cultural expectations of children’s media and horror (Antunes 2020). Though this literature has shed light on several aspects of the film’s significance, there is to date no sustained scholarly inquiry that brings these insights together and examines the historical and cultural significance specifically of Nightmare Before Christmas. This edited collection seeks to address this gap, considering the different layers of meanings and history of Nightmare Before Christmas from pre-production to the present day.  

Nightmare Before Christmas was released quietly in 1993 under Disney’s Touchstone banner and sold primarily on the art-house appeal of its animation technique, amid fears that a close association with child audiences would harm Disney’s reputation. But the film was an immediate success and has since been reclaimed by Disney as one of its most beloved family titles. Growing into a cult phenomenon, Nightmare Before Christmas still cultivates a dedicated fandom across the globe today with an array of merchandise, tie-in products, and other media. 

Nightmare Before Christmas marks an important moment of technological development in stop-motion animation, and the technique has continued to have a key presence in the industry, particularly associated with horror- and gothic-inspired narratives (Selick’s Coraline and ParaNoman, or Burton’s Corpse Bride and Frankenweenie), where it blurs questions of suitability for child audiences and continues to fuel debates about the art of animated films and its target audiences. Indeed, the specific combination of stop-motion and children’s horror in Nightmare Before Christmas is key to how the film has negotiated genre, suitability, and other cultural categories in its original and retrospective reception, questions which often become tangled with ideas of nostalgia. 

More recently, Nightmare Before Christmas continues to serve as a point of reference for negotiations of genre and of the boundaries between mainstream and niche cultures, both on screen and in spaces of fandom. Its many afterlives expand well beyond the film industry, occupying manga and comic books , board games, and other paraphernalia, as well as physical rooted localities through events such as the live-staged musical, theme parks, and in exhibits (Hicks 2013), as well as through the fan practices that the film has inspired, such as fan fashion (Cuthill 2017) and makeup, cosplay, textual production, and transcultural fandom. 

How can we best understand Nightmare Before Christmas and its significance in the history of film and animation? What is Nightmare Before Christmas’ legacy thirty years on, and how does it continue to challenge and delight audiences, scholars, and industry today?  

This book aims to collect diverse and original insights into the meanings and impacts of Nightmare Before Christmas from a range of disciplinary perspectives and methods. Some suggested topics include: 

  • Nightmare Before Christmas in animation and film history; 
  • animation and genre (musicals/fairy tales/horror/family/etc); 
  • narrative structure in Nightmare Before Christmas and the audience; 
  • stop-motion as animation technique and cultural object; 
  • animation and branding practices; 
  • Nightmare Before Christmas as seasonal media (Christmas/Halloween); 
  • suitability, animation, and young audiences; 
  • children’s horror animation before and after Nightmare Before Christmas;
  • animation and nostalgia; 
  • animation, technology, and art; 
  • the music of Nightmare Before Christmas (songs, covers, re-releases, etc.); 
  • the politics of representation in Nightmare Before Christmas
  • childhood in Nightmare Before Christmas and its associated texts and practices; 
  • authorship and associated debates (Burton/Selick/Elfman/Disney), including the links between Nightmare Before Christmas and other works; 
  • franchises and franchising relationships; 
  • live and experiential events linked to the film (live musicals, theme park attractions, the Beetle House restaurants in New York and Los Angeles, Tim Burton exhibitions, etc.); 
  • transmedia and merchandise (Funko figures, action figures, board games, clothing and make-up, cookbooks, etc.); 
  • transnational critical and audience/fan reception; 
  • fandom, subcultures (Goth/emo), and fan practices, including transformative works (fan animation, fanfiction, fan videos,…); 
  • cosplay and the body in Nightmare Before Christmas fandom. 

JQuestions and informal discussion can be directed at any of the three co-editors: Filipa Antunes (a.antunes@uea.ac.uk), Brittany Eldridge (brittany.eldridge.18@ucl.ac.uk), and Rebecca Williams (rebecca.williams@southwales.ac.uk). Formal proposals (under 300 words) and short bio should be emailed to Rebecca Williams by 3 May 2021. 

CFP: A Celebration of Slashers

November 28, 2017

A  Celebration  of  Slashers #DePaulSlashers (DePaul  University,  April  28,  2018)  
Now accepting  submissions  and  ideas  for  the  sixth  annual  Pop  Culture  Colloquium  at  DePaul  University in  Chicago!  

DePaul  University’s  College  of  Communication  is  hosting  a  one-day  celebratory  colloquium in  honor  of  the  Slasher  genre  on  Saturday,  April  28, from  9am-6pm.  More  details  can  be  found  at popcultureconference.com.  

This  event  will  feature  roundtable  discussions  from  scholars  and  fans  of  slasher  films  (topics  do  not  have to  focus  on  Halloween),  including  the  Friday  the  13th, Nightmare  on  Elm  Street,  and  other  franchises, films,  television  series,  video  games,  graphic  novels,  or  et  al.  

Our  keynote  speaker  is  Rachel  Talalay, director  of  Nightmare  on  Elm  Street 5  as  well  as  multiple  television  series  (Doctor  Who,  Sherlock, Riverdale,  Flash,  Supernatural,  Reign…the  list goes  on.)  

Participants  may  propose  panels  and  topics  about  a  broad  array  of  ideas  related  to  the  genre  and  its cultural  impact.  The  Pop  Culture  Conference  does  not  feature  formal  paper  presentations,  but  speakers  are invited  to  have  roundtable  discussions  themed  around  these  topics.  The  audience  for  this  event  is  both graduate  and  undergraduate  students,  both  fans  and  scholars.   If  you’re  interested  in  speaking  on  a  roundtable, or  want to  propose  a  panel with  3-5  people,  or  have  ideas for  other  events/lectures, please  send  a  300  word  abstract  that  proposes  a  significant  topic  of discussion  and  a  CV/resume  to  Pop  Culture  Conference  (popcultureconference@gmail.com)  by  Jan 15,  2018. Please  aim  your  abstracts  for  a  more  general audience  and  for  a  discussion  rather  than traditional scholarly  paper  presentation.  We  will  also  have  the  opportunity  to  publish  a  longer  version  of your  talk  in  an  update  to  our  Time  Lords  and  Tribbles  book. 

Potential  topics  include  (but  are  not  limited  to): 

Slashers  and  gender 

Slashers  and  race 

Narrative  and  genre  theories  of  slashers 

Changes  in  the  horror  genre 

Slasher/horror  fandom 

The  impact of  particular  directors, writers, or  actors  on  the  genre 

Teaching  horror/slashers 

Adaptation  within  the  slasher  canon 

Case  studies  of  slasher  films 

What  counts  as  a  slasher? 

For  more  information,  please  check  out  popcultureconference.com,  and  sign  up  for  updates  on  Facebook (search  “A  Celebration  of  Slashers”).  

We  hope  that  you  will  be  able  to  join  in  the  discussion  and celebration! 

CFP: Global TV Horror 

October 31, 2017

Global TV Horror – edited collection call for abstracts ed. Stacey Abbott and Lorna Jowett
When Stacey Abbott and Lorna Jowett hatched the idea for a book on TV Horror in the early 2000s, they had only a sense that by the time the book was published in 2012 there would be many more horror TV series to watch, write about, and discuss. In this follow up to TV Horror, the first full-length examination of horror on television, they take aim at global TV horror.

Television audiences and horror fans across the world may be most familiar with the latest big brands in TV horror such as The Walking Dead (US, 2010-), yet horror has always had a truly international reach. From anthology series to children’s drama, Belphegor [Phantom of the Louvre] (France, 1965), Historias para no dormir [Stories to Keep You Awake] (Spain, 1966–82), Children of the Stones (UK, 1977), Riget [The Kingdom] (Denmark, 1994-1997) and Goosebumps (Canada, 1995-98) terrified viewers, imprinted themselves on memories, and influenced the contemporary boom in horror on TV. With the expansion of TV channels, view on demand and streaming services, more and more content is needed, and niche productions with distinctive characteristics are more welcome than ever. The last five years have given us the moody and atmospheric Les Revenants [The Returned] (France, 2012-), adaptations of novel series like Bitten (Canada, 2014-16), contemporary reimaginings of queer horror classics in web series Carmilla (Canada, 2014), cross-genre Scandi series Fortitude (UK, 2015-) and Jordskott (Sweden, 2015-), films remade as TV, such as Wolf Creek (Australia, 2016-), original Amazon series like Tokyo Vampire Hotel (Japan, 2017-), one-off miniseries such as Au-delà des Murs [Beyond The Walls] (France/ Belgium, 2016), and American Netflix animated series Castlevania (US, 2017-) based on a series of Japanese video games. Horror on television shows no signs of abating, and more and more global productions are reaching audiences as national boundaries are eroded by digital technologies.

We seek proposals that address the full range and scope of ‘horror’ and ‘television’ in a global context, historical and contemporary. Chapters may engage with, though are not restricted to, the areas below.

• Global production and co-production, commissioning

• Distribution and global circulation via import/ export or illegal downloading

• Platforms and delivery: VoD, streaming, inter/national branding

• Translation, subbing, and dubbing

• Adaptations and remakes

• Forms and formats: serial drama, webisodes, webseries, miniseries, TV movies, long and short forms, non-fiction horror TV

• Aesthetics: visual and aural style, FX and make up; music and soundscapes

• Crossing over: international stars and creators

• Consumption and reception: global audiences and fandoms

• Cultural and national horrors: reimagining horror tropes in inter/national markets

• Inter/national representations and identities

• Horror v. terror

• Genre splicing and global TV trends

• Children’s international horror television

• Global transmedia horror: paratexts, overflow, narrative extensions

Proposals of 300 words, along with a short biography, should be submitted to both editors (s.abbott@roehampton.ac.uk and lorna.jowett@northampton.ac.uk) by 28 February 2018.

CFP: The Future of Fandom 

August 3, 2017

Transformative Works and Cultures CFP: The Future of Fandom (1/15/18; 9/15/18)


This special 10th anniversary issue of Transformative Works and Cultures seeks to explore the future of fandom while looking back to its past. How might scholarship on fandom’s past and present invite speculation about its future? And what might the
possible futures invoked by technological, ecological, and political discourses mean for fandom’s communities and practices? Science fiction in particular–the field whose strategies spawned fandom, and the genre in which much fan activity occurs–has used
imagined futures to shed new light on the present and the past. In turn, studying where we are and where we have been allows us to imagine where we may be heading.

We invite essays that seek to historicize and contextualize fans, fan works, and fandoms across past, present, and future. Scholarship on fandom’s futures can open connections between technology and interfaces, fannish discussions and trends, fictions of imagined
futures, and cultural and political changes in order to illustrate how fandoms may be understood in their historical contexts and cultural interactions.

This issue will feature a special section, “Predictions,” that will allow fans and academics to imagine fannish futures. We particularly invite personal and creative responses, including essays from the future, documenting trends that haven’t yet come to be.

Possible topics include but are not limited to:
 * How have interfaces affected fannish communities and production, and how may these change in the future?
 * How do demographic shifts in fandom and new voices change fan works and communities? How have new generations of fans changed fandom?
 * How have the intersection and interactions between industry and audiences changed, and how may they change in the future?
 * How do fannish futures look from different global locations, and what will transnational landscapes of fandom look like in the future?
 * How is the fannish future gendered and racialized? How have fans created or imagined different futures for queerness, transness, disability?
 * How have fandoms engaged with Afrofuturism, Chicanafuturism, Indigenous futurism, and other literary, cultural, and social movements challenging the whiteness of the imagined future?
 * How has the commercialization of fan works changed over time, and how will it play out in the future legally, economically, or socially? Is there still a clear distinction between fan and pro writers?
 * How have social and cultural changes affect the intersections between politics and fandom? How do these changes connect to fannish social activism?
 * What changes in the source material and media, in fannish social organization, platforms, and technology, in fannish access, culture, and demographics do we see emerging as we look ahead?
 * How does the increasing mainstreaming of fannish behavior affect fannish identities and behaviors? How does it alter mainstream audiences’ engagement with fannish subcultures and media industries.
 * What will fandom be 10 years from now, or 20? Are there some things that never change, that make us what we are––and if so, what?

Submission guidelines: Transformative Works and Cultures (TWC,
http://journal.transformativeworks.org/
) is an international peer-reviewed online Gold Open Access publication of the nonprofit Organization for Transformative Works copyrighted under a Creative Commons License. TWC aims to provide a publishing outlet that
welcomes fan-related topics and to promote dialogue between the academic community and the fan community. TWC accommodates academic articles of varying scope as well as other forms that embrace the technical possibilities of the Web and test the limits of
the genre of academic writing.

    Theory: Conceptual essays. Peer review, 6,000–8,000 words.
    Praxis: Case study essays. Peer review, 5,000–7,000 words.
    Symposium: Short commentary. Editorial review, 1,500–2,500 words.

Contact: Please visit TWC’s Web site (http://journal.transformativeworks.org/) for complete submission guidelines, or e-mail the TWC Editor (editor@transformativeworks.org).

Due date: January 15, 2018, for estimated September 15, 2018 publication.

CFP: Investigating Identities in Young Adult (YA) Narratives: Symposium

August 1, 2017

Investigating Identities in Young Adult (YA) Narratives

Symposium on the 13/12/2017 at The University of Northampton UK

From JK Rowling’s Harry Potter series to Stephenie Meyer’s Twilight, Young Adult (YA) narratives have grown exponentially over the past twenty years. Adopting a range of genres and platforms including the Bildungsroman and the coming of age teen drama, YA narratives represent a significant cultural means to explore the formation of identity in all its varied aspects. This one day symposium at the University of Northampton will investigate the representation of identity constructions in relation to narrative form in YA narratives both past and present.

Suggested topics may include, but are no means limited to:

–          Representations of racial/ethnic identity in YA narratives

–          Representations of gender and/or sexual identity in YA narratives

–          The representation of identity in YA narratives in relation to the notion of class

–          Interrogations of YA narrative’s treatment of LGBTQIA+ identities

–          The effect of trauma on identity in YA narratives

–          YA narratives and the notion of the outsider or other

–          The relationship between genre and the notion of identity in YA narratives

–          The representation of non-binary identities in YA narratives

–          The transition from childhood to adulthood in classic (children’s) literature

–          The representation of disability in relation to the notion of identity in YA narratives

–          The use and function of supernatural identities in YA narratives

Being an interdisciplinary symposium focused on narrative, papers from across the subject areas of literature, screen studies, history, popular culture and education studies are invited. The symposium welcomes papers on both YA literature and screen adaptations, and from scholars working on earlier periods as well as contemporary culture.

The symposium invites papers from academics, early career researchers and postgraduate research students alike.

Abstracts of no more than 250 words should be sent to both sonya.andermahr@northampton.ac.ukand anthony.stepniak2@northampton.ac.uk by the 8th October 2017.

CFP: FANS OF COLOR, FANDOMS OF COLOR 

July 26, 2017

Special Issue TWC CFP: FANS OF COLOR, FANDOMS OF COLOR (3/1/18; 3/15/19)

In a 2015 essay in Transformative Works and Cultures, Rebecca Wanzo calls for “a new genealogy of fan studies” to begin to remedy the systemic oversight of race in fan studies. Drawing mostly from scholars who may not claim or be claimed by fan studies, Wanzo
offers a genealogy of black popular culture theorists who have engaged in “black fan criticism and acafandom.” 

We welcome authors who wish to build on this genealogy of black fandom scholarship or to create parallel and intersectional genealogies of fan scholarship. Recent discussion of race and fandom has addressed issues of media representations of characters of
color (Warner 2015), fannish responses by and to fans of color and the conversations surrounding race in fan works (Pande 2017), and racebending and “racial revision” in fan productions (Thomas and Stornaiuolo 2016, carrington 2016). This issue seeks to
expand on these lines of investigation, and to promote new ones.
The editors invite the submission of short and long scholarly essays by and about people of color who self-identify as fans (“fans of color”), and about fan communities that have formed around media characters and texts that predominantly or prominently
feature characters of color (“fandoms of color”). The editors are particularly eager to review contributions that involve methodological innovation, and/or draw on sources from historical periods other than the contemporary.

As both the scholars and objects fan studies have, to date, been predominantly white, we seek work from fan scholars of every ethnicity about their own experiences, and the experiences of people of color, in and with fandom. Here are additional topics that
authors might wish to explore for this special issue:

  • The fannish and transformative practices of audience members of color.
  • How a community of color is fannish about performers of color or about media texts that primarily feature people of color.
  • How a predominantly white community is fannish about performers of color or about media texts that primarily feature people of color.
  • Fans, “stans,” and stanning.
  • Close readings of the performances or public personae of stars or characters of color, or of specific media texts about communities of color.
  • First-person essays: what it feels like to be a fan of color, or what it feels like to be in a fandom that is mostly comprised of fans of color, or what it feels like to be a fan of an ethnic performer/text who is not the same ethnicity of that performer/text.
  • Revisiting key concepts of fan studies or race/ethnicity studies in the context of fans of color/fandoms of color.
  • Being a fan (or non-fan or anti-fan) of racially problematic/racist texts.
* Actors of color who play white characters or other cases of actors portraying an ethnicity other than their own.
  • “White savior” texts or whitewashing in film/television casting.
  • Race/ethnicity in fan casting (“racebending”).
  • Diversity (or lack thereof) in awards shows.
  • Black Girl Nerds or “blerds” in general.
  • Fans of color in/and Diaspora, or other transnational audience communities.
  • Fansubs, or other transformative/interpretive practices, and language, nationality, race/ethnicity.
  • Mixed-race and racially ambiguous characters/actors.
  • Ships of color, slash, and other fan fiction/art featuring characters of color.
  • Interracial ships, brotps, BFFs.
  • Intersections between race/ethnicity and gender, sexuality, class, nationality, and/or religion in fan communities, fan practices, or the experiences of individual fans.
  • Transformative works, reception, and fandom in the scholarly fields of East Asian, South Asian, Pacific Islander, and Asian American Studies; Indigenous/First Nations Studies; Africana/Black Studies; Latinx Studies; Middle Eastern, Islamic Studies, and
    other fields.

Works cited
carrington, andré. 2016. Speculative Blackness: The Future of Race in Science Fiction. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press.
Pande, Rukmini. 2017. “Squee From the Margins: Investigating the Operations of Racial/Cultural/Ethnic Identity in Media Fandom.” Ph.D. Dissertation, The University of Western Australia.
Thomas, Ebony Elizabeth and Amy Stornaiuolo. 2016. “Restorying the Self: Bending Toward Textual Justice.” Harvard Educational Review, Vol. 86, No. 3, pp. 313-338.
Wanzo, Rebecca. 2015. “African American Acafandom and Other Strangers: New Genealogies of Fan Studies.” Transformative Works and Cultures, Vol. 20.

http://journal.transformativeworks.org/index.php/twc/article/view/699/538
.
Warner, Kristen. 2015. The Cultural Politics of Colorblind TV Casting. New York: Routledge.

SUBMISSION GUIDELINES

Transformative Works and Cultures (TWC,
http://journal.transformativeworks.org/
) is an international peer-reviewed online Gold Open Access publication of the nonprofit Organization for Transformative Works copyrighted under a Creative Commons License. TWC aims to provide a publishing outlet that
welcomes fan-related topics and to promote dialogue between the academic community and the fan community. TWC accommodates academic articles of varying scope as well as other forms that embrace the technical possibilities of the Web and test the limits of
the genre of academic writing.

Theory: Conceptual essays. Peer review, 6,000–8,000 words.

Praxis: Case study essays. Peer review, 5,000–7,000 words.

Symposium: Short commentary. Editorial review, 1,500–2,500 words.

Please visit TWC’s Web site (http://journal.transformativeworks.org/) for complete submission guidelines, or e-mail the TWC Editor (editor@transformativeworks.org).

CONTACT—Contact guest editors Abigail De Kosnik (adekosnik@berkeley.edu) and andré carrington (profcarrington@drexel.edu). 

DUE DATE—March 1, 2018, for estimated March 2019 publication.

CFP: The Routledge Companion to Media and Tourism 

July 15, 2017

The Routledge Companion to Media and Tourism – 1st Call for Expressions of Interest for Book Chapter

We warmly invite you to submit your book chapter abstract for consideration for our book proposal for the Routledge Companion to book series. The aim of the “Routledge Companion to” book series is to define the current state of theory and research in a specialised field, in this case media and tourism, and create a foundation for future scholarship and study. Thus this companion will provide a comprehensive, must-have survey of the media and tourism-field, and also map out the emerging critical terrain.

Submission of expressions of interest: 31st of August 2017

Editors:

Dr. Maria Månsson, Lund University, Sweden

Dr. Lena Eskilsson, Lund University, Sweden

Dr. Anne Buchman, University of Newcastle, Australia

The relationship of media and tourism continues to attract popular and academic interest. Lund University (Sweden) recently organised the 7th International Tourism and Media (ITAM) conference, and this call for proposals sprung from this event. The aim of the conference was to move tourism and media knowledge forward by including a broad range of interests and backgrounds within the field of tourism and media research. Themes presented at this conference were from different disciplines and included, for example, popular culture (especially film) and tourism; travel writing; media and the making of different tourism spaces; destination marketing; media, tourists and representation; sport, media and tourism; processes of mediatization and tourism; social media and tourism; smartphones and tourism; tourism information material and tourists searches for information and the film industry and tourism.

However, while there has been a growing interest for the interrelationship between media and tourism from different disciplinary perspectives, these discussions are often published in different forums. The Routledge Companion to Media and Tourism consequentially aims at providing a comprehensive state of the art concerning media and tourism research from a multidisciplinary approach. The aim is to have 40-50 authors from around the globe and with a range of disciplines and various stages of academic career contributing to this companion. Any such contributions will need to survey a specific topic and critically discuss the leading views in the area. This includes discursive and reflective pieces and also discussions of original empirical work (cases).
Contributions are welcomed that address (but are not limited to) the following broad areas:

  • Popular culture, fans and tourists

    The nexus between cultural heritage, media and tourism

    Film-induced tourism

    Media, tourism and spatial aspects

    Digitalisation, social media and tourism

    Smartphones and impact on tourism/tourists

    Travel writing, guide books

    Literary tourism

    Representation, media and tourism

    Destination marketing

    Tourists and Tourist Photography

    The impacts of popular culture on tourism organizations

    Mediatization, convergence and popular culture

    Media and tourist performances

    Media use and consumption

Submission information

Abstracts of 300 – 400 words in the form of a word-processed email attachment should be sent to Maria Månsson, maria.mansson@ism.lu.se, by 31st of August. Please include the details below with the abstract:

  • Proposed chapter title

    Author(s) and affiliation details

    Type of contribution (e.g., philosophical, conceptual, methodological, case study)

    Keywords (maximum of 5)

The approximate timeline, depending on the success of the proposal, is as follows:

Final submission deadline of abstract: 31st of August 2017
Notification of contribution: October 2017
Final submission deadline of full text (5000 words): January 2018
Target publication date: 2018

If you have any questions regarding this call for proposal don’t hesitate to get in touch.

Maria Månsson, Lund University, Sweden (maria.mansson@ism.lu.se)
Lena Eskilsson, Lund University, Sweden (lena.eskilsson@ism.lu.se)

Anne Buchmann, University of Newcastle, Australia (anne.buchmann@newcastle.edu.au

CFP: Bridging Gaps:National Identity in Persona, Branding, and Activism

June 27, 2017

University of Western Australia

Perth, Australia
December 8-10, 2017


CALL FOR PAPERS:

With the rise of Web 2.0, people brand themselves through social media as a singular person. The online visibility of their brand often takes precedence over social contributions. Their online presentation, however, is a reflection of how they want to be perceived in a collective setting. How does this kind of branding differ to a local business service or an international celebrity who also brands themselves online? What impact is persona branding having on society and the way people view themselves?

A focus on the persona of activists shows the particular impact of branding in society. An activist’s voice, like that of a political leader, is often heard if they have a strong brand. Yet, the perception is often specific to their national contexts. How are socialist actions in North Korea viewed in the Western world? How does having a female political leader change the perception of a country? How are immigrants seen around the world? What role does media play in creating theseconstructed views in national and transnational contexts?

We encourage scholars and industry practitioners to question, explore, and problematize the notion of national identity in persona, branding, and activism. We ask:how is a country reflected through its celebrities, popular history, stereotypes and myths? Often one individual can have global fame, which can result in branding a nation or city and develop a country’s cause as well. Their persona becomes the basis of how a place is perceived internationally. For example, American born icon Elvis Presley is used to represent Las Vegas and Memphis, while George Clooney has attached himself to Darfur through his activism. Similarly, Steve Irwin became a symbol of Australian culture through his philanthropy and his fame as “The Crocodile Hunter.” A decade since his death people still create the association between him and the nation’s identity, while overlooking how race, gender and class affect one’s overall brand identity.Myths surrounding national identity are also evident in beauty pageants and the Olympics. How do these stereotypes affect our understanding of culture?

The Centre for Media and Celebrity Studies (CMCS) Bridging Gaps conference, in association with sponsors Centre for Ecological, Social, and Informatics Cognitive Research (ESI.CORE) and WaterHill Publishing, invites papers and films that explore the relationship among four key themes – persona, branding, activism, and national identity. We invite academics, filmmakers, journalists, publicists, designers, advertisers, marketing specialists, charity organizers, and guests to explore and connect themes from a range of interdisciplinary fields and generate a valuable discussion and practice that will inspire change.

Attendees may present papers, take part in a workshop or create a roundtable discussion on the themes of persona, branding, activism and national identity. We recommend roundtables on Heath Ledger but open to discussions on other stars in national contexts of Australia and abroad.

Extended versions of selected papers will be published in an edited book by WaterHill Publishing, while others will be invited for the opportunity to publish work in the CrossBridge journal.

We also invite people to send in videos for the Celebrity Chat Award. The idea forCelebrity Chat was born in Melbourne and the first recording took place in Perth. We are proud to be bringing it back home. The best video/documentary will be selected based on its ability to draw attention to a significant matter, be relevant to the conference theme and/or inspire change.

Registration includes: Your printed conference package, catered lunch, coffee / tea breaks, evening drinks, professional development workshop, access to evening receptions, eligibility to publish in edited book, and consideration for the $100 best paper and screen awards.

Submission guidelines:

    • 250-word abstract or workshop / roundtable proposal
    • Include a title, your name, e-mail address, and affiliation if applicable
    • Submit to conference Chairs Dr Jackie Raphael and Dr Celia Lam at email address: celeb.studies@gmail.com
    • Deadline for abstract submission:July 28, 2017
    • Notification of acceptance: August 25, 2017
    • Full text dueNovember 1, 2017
    • Pre-Conference reception: December 8, 2017
    • Conference presentations:December 9-10, 2017
    • Publication of edited book: 2018

Celebrity Chat Video Submissions:

  • Video length should be 10-20 minutes
  • Include a title, your name, e-mail address, and affiliation if applicable
  • Submit to conference Chairs Dr Jackie Raphael and Dr Celia Lam at email address: celeb.studies@gmail.com
  • Deadline for submission: August 1, 2017
  • Notification of acceptance: September 15, 201
  • Conference screening: December 9-10, 2017

Topics include but are not limited to:

  • National Identity and Persona
  • Activism and Philanthropy
  • Fandom and Audiences
  • Endorsements and Advertising
  • Branding and Graphic Design
  • Tourism and Promotion
  • Politics and Leadership
  • Persona and Online Presence
  • Mass Media and Social Media
  • Public Relations and Publicity
  • Journalism and Newsworthy Topics
  • Fame and Fortune
  • Gender and Power
  • Icons and Status
  • Beauty Ideals, Pageants and Culture
  • Models as Role Models
  • Olympics and Representing Nations
  • Sporting Identities
  • Literature and Photography
  • Film and Television
  • Laws and Policies
  • Theory and Methods
  • Research Agenda and Business Models
  • Ethics and Morality
  • Cognition and Memory
  • Social Innovation and Change
  • Education and Advocacy
  • Community Building and Community Partnerships

Conference Chairs: Dr Jackie Raphael and Dr Celia Lam
Conference Committee: Dr Kirsty Fairclough, Dr Bertha Chin and Bethan Jones and
Conference URLhttp://cmc-centre.com/conferences/2017perth/

CFP: MeCCSA 2018

June 23, 2017

10—12 January 2018


London South Bank University
Theme: Creativity and Agency
Deadline for proposals: Monday 18 September 2017

We are pleased to invite you to submit abstracts, panel proposals and posters for the next Annual MeCCSA Conference, to be held on 10—12 January 2018 at the School of Arts and Creative Industries, London South Bank University.

The conference is the annual presentation of the best work across the whole range of MeCCSA interests, and is also an opportunity to hear about and discuss important topics in both media and HE policy relevant to MeCCSA members.

We welcome scholarly papers, panels, practice contributions, film screenings, and posters across the full range of interests represented by MeCCSA and its networks, including, but not limited to:

• Cultural and media policy
• Film and television studies and practice
• Radio studies and practice
• Representation, identity, ideology
• Social movements
• Digital games studies
• Women’s media studies
• Disability studies within media studies
• Approaches to media pedagogy
• Children, young people and media
• Diasporic and ethnic minority media
• Political communication
• Methodological approaches
• Media practice research and teaching

The theme of the MeCCSA 2018 conference is Creativity and Agency. ‘Creativity’ is a concept that is, at least implicitly, central to many courses in our subject area, which often entail analysis of ‘creative industries’ and include elements of ‘creative
practice’ as part of the curriculum. Yet it remains a highly contested concept, from the official promotion of the ‘creative economy’ through to more recent debates about the commodification of everyday ‘creative labour’ via social media. How has the concept
developed in the twenty-first century? How should we interpret today’s creative landscape?

Confirmed keynote speakers:

• Professor David Gauntlett (University of Westminster)
• Professor Angela McRobbie (Goldsmiths, University of London)
• Professor Andy Miah (University of Salford)

We invite proposals for papers, practice contributions, themed panels and other presentations which engage with the various artistic, organisational, social, political, economic, individual, collective and technological dimensions of creativity and agency.
Potential topics could include, but are not limited to:

• art and activism
• creativity and cultural policy
• everyday creativity
• public service media as a creative agent
• technology and creativity
• creative entrepreneurship and cultural industries
• individual and collective conceptions of creativity
• non-fiction and creativity
• creativity and pedagogy
• creative labour and social media
• creativity and practice research

Deadline for proposals: Monday 18 September

Individual abstracts should be up to 250 words. Panel proposals should include a short description and rationale (200 words) together with abstracts for each of the 3-4 papers (150-200 words each including details of the contributor), and the name and contact
details of the panel proposer. The panel proposer should co-ordinate the submissions for that panel as a single proposal.

Practice-based work

We actively support the presentation of practice-as-research and have a flexible approach to practice papers and presentations. This may include opportunities to present papers and screenings in the same sessions or as part of a separate screening strand. 
We also welcome shorter papers in association with short screenings/sharing. We have dedicated presentation spaces to display practice artefacts including screenings and computer-based work. For displaying practice work, please include specific technical data
(e.g. duration, format) and a URL pointing to any support material when submitting your abstract.

Direct link for proposals submission:
http://tinyurl.com/abstracts-2018

Conference website: http://www.meccsa2018.org
Email enquiries: MeCCSA2018@lsbu.ac.uk
Twitter: @MeCCSA2018