Author Archive

CFP: Zone Moda Journal: Fashion and celebrity culture: Body spectacle and the enlarged sphere of show business

May 12, 2017

For more than a century, the fashion industry and fashion marketing have actively participated in the enormous and progressive expansion of show business’ sphere of action, expression, behavior, and texts (an expansion further stretched – in the new millennium – by you tube, social networks , video games, and the domestication of entertainment).The last two decades have been marked by the dissemination, availability, and spreading of information about fashion products, fashion sites and events, and, most of all, of fashion personalities (designers, models, art directors, publicists). This availability of fashion imagination and consumption has intermingled with other practices and pleasures of show business, from filmmaking to red carpets. Conflating with movie watching, awarding, publicity, and gossip, the viewers’ expanded attention to fashion items has had a great impact on the general notion of /what/ public personalities are and what they look like. It has contributed to inflate the interest in celebrities and to enlarge the number of celebrities. It has exploded the ambition and desire of the hitherto unknown  to increase their own public self-exposure, enlarging  spectators’ experience of leisure and spectacle and the spaces of entertainment.

At the same time, celebrities can be generated outside the world of the show business and instead turn a crime, a scientific discovery, a political statement into entertainment and spectacle. The artist-as-celebrity , going back to Oscar Wilde if not earlier , has been joined by the artist as /fashion /celebrity, a phenomenon that arguably started with Andy Warhol , while the past twenty years have seen the emergence of the /sporting /‘fashion celebrity ‘ ; musicians from every genre can be part of the new fashion spectacle, if they are suitably photogenic. The general attractiveness of a myriad kind of celebrities, hybrid, hardly definable, open to dispute, has inflated and rendered more /visible/ the sphere of entertainment. Similarly, fashion was born when /couture/ inhabited restricted, private, and aristocratic conclaves: now expertise about clothing, style and image creation has entered the sphere of spectacle and entertainment. Fashion creates images and codes through which celebrities are conceived and exposed, reproduced. Fashion forges the celebrity text. In the new millennium “Our lives, our intellect, our religion, our creativity, our sexuality are all the vocabulary of fashion and are open for renegotiation and representation. Yet we view fashion as suspect, insubstantial, the stuff of dreams not reality” (Changing Fashion: A Critical Introduction to Trend Analysis and Meaning’ Annette Lynch, Mitchell Strauss, p. 1 ). This could also be said of contemporary celebrity, which shares withbfashion an ambivalent status, halfway between materiality and insubstantiality, where narration plays a pivotal role.

The general public’s enjoyment, contempt, and denigration of celebrities is based on personal narratives: stories about celebrities’ private lives, about their bodies and apparatuses: aesthetic surgery, clothes, technologies… This journal issue devoted to celebrity and fashion investigates the modes of verbal and visual narrations revolving around attractive personalities. How does this narrative factor, which supports the celebrity system , operate within and  influence the world of fashion, and how have the stories about fashion (films, biographies, but also publicity, gossip, events, spaces, architecture) influenced the world of show business?

To tackle the intriguing relationship between fashion and celebrity culture, we suggest the following topics:

*Influence, masses, populism*: democratization of fashion,
democratization of celebrity: conflicts and ambivalences between notions of ordinariness vs. exceptionality. Discourse about audiences as agents in the making of meanings concerning celebrities. Fashion seen as a vehicle of the mass appropriation of the means of construction of the celebrity’s image.

*Success, achievement, publicity: *Fashion publicity, fashion
branding**and the**culture of the branded self. Public versus private life, aristocratic exclusiveness versus egalitarism.

*Sponsorship and Internet celebrities*: Wide access to celebrity information through the social media: how does this generate new kinds of sponsorship on part of fashion brands? How do Internet personalities negotiate between their performance of authenticity and their fashion endorsement?

*Historical roots and new celebrities: *How is 20th century prototypes, i.e. the rock-star or the classical Hollywood star, influencing the culture of celebrity? Do new forms of celebrity (micro-celebrity,
anti-celebrity, subcultural-celebrity…) correspond to new styles and new circulation of fashion trends? Old and new atypical star bodies: their impact on fashion bodily stylizations. Fashion professionals turning into celebrities.

*Character versus Film Persona*. Film and television characters’ fashion styles interact with actors/actresses’ public personas. Are there celebrity icons who have become style icons due to their fictional characterizations more than their public appearance?

*Taste, disgust, anti-celebrity*. Celebrities as models of good or bad taste. Bad taste condemnation influencing the aesthetic canon. Anti-canon and celebrities’ social connotation (celebrity chav, rich
kids…). Anti-celebrity as a result of anti-fashion styles. How does a celebrity’s repudiation of a luxury style affect critical consumption? Style icons turning into celebrities: how does taste capital” isvtransformed into “celebrity capital”?

*Cumbersome celebrities and fashion fails*: celebrities might become detrimental to fashion brands: scandals can induce both rejection and employment of a testimonial. How do fashion brands react to celebrities’ lapses of style and fashion fails? Do these fall downs contribute to the construction of a celebrity?

Abstracts of no more than 1000 words + 5 bibliographical references (word-, doc format), written either in Italian or English, are be sent
to: zonemodajournal@unibo.it <mailto:zonemodajournal@unibo.it>

Abstract acceptance does not guarantee publication of the article, which will be submitted to a double-blind peer-review process. The length of the article should be comprised between 6000 / 7000 words.

Important dates:

– abstract submission deadline: June 15, 2017

– notification of acceptance/rejection: June, 30 2017 (notice of
acceptance might include comments and requests of explanations)

– full-lenght paper submission deadline: September 20,

– comments of the reviewers will be conveyed together with the
reviewers’ decision (approval with no changes, approval with major/minor changes, rejection) by October 16, 2017

– authors shall send the improved article to the editorial staff by
Novembre 6, 2017.

ZMJ7 is scheduled to be published at the end of 2017.

CFP: The 8th Biennial Slayage Conference on the WhedonversesFlorence, Alabama, US / Summer 2018

May 12, 2017

Slayage: The Journal of Whedon Studies, the Whedon Studies Association, and conveners Stacey Abbott and Cynthia Burkhead invite proposals for the eighth biennial Slayage Conference on the Whedonverses (SCW8). Devoted to Joss Whedon’s creative works, SCW8 will be held on the campus of the University of North Alabama, Florence, Alabama, June 21-24, 2018. The conference will be organized by Local Arrangements Chair Cynthia Burkhead, along with Slayage alumns Anissa Graham, Stephanie Graves, Jennifer Butler Keeton, and Brenna Wardell
We welcome proposals of 200-300 words (or an abstract of a completed paper) on any aspect of Whedon’s television and web texts (Buffy the Vampire SlayerAngelFireflyDr. Horrible’s Sing-Along BlogDollhouse,Marvel’s Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.); his films (SerenityThe Cabin in the WoodsMarvel’s The AvengersMuch Ado About Nothing, The Avengers: Age of Ultron, In Your Eyes); his comics (e.g. FrayAstonishing X-MenRunaways;Sugarshock!Buffy the Vampire Slayer Season EightNine, and TenAngel: After the FallAngel & Faith Season Nine and Ten); or any element of the work of Whedon and his collaborators. Additionally, a proposal may address paratexts, fandoms, or Whedon’s extracurricular—political and activist—activities, such as his involvement with Equality Now or the 2016 US elections.  Since Florence, Alabama is one of the four cities making up the Shoals, and the area is rich in music history (the Muscle Shoals Sound, W.C. Handy) as well as Native American History, we look forward to papers addressing these subjects as they relate to the Whedonverses. Multidisciplinary approaches (literature, philosophy, political science, history, communications, film and television studies, women’s studies, religion, linguistics, music, cultural studies, art, and others) are all welcome. A proposal/abstract should demonstrate familiarity with already-published scholarship in the field, which includes dozens of books, hundreds of articles, and over a fifteen years of the blind peer-reviewed journal Slayage. Proposers may wish to consult Whedonology: An Academic Whedon Studies Bibliography, housed with Slayage atwww.whedonstudies.tv.

An individual paper is strictly limited to a maximum reading time of 20 minutes, and we encourage, though do not require, self-organized panels of three presenters. Proposals for workshops, roundtables, or other types of sessions are also welcome. Submissions by graduate and undergraduate students are invited; undergraduates should provide the name, email, and phone number of a faculty member willing to consult with them (the faculty member does not need to attend). Proposals should be submitted online through this SCW8 webpage (see below) and will be reviewed by program chairs Stacey Abbott, Cynthia Burkhead, and Rhonda V. Wilcox. Submissions must be received by Monday, 8 January 2018. Decisions will be made by 5 March 2018. Questions regarding proposals can be directed to Rhonda V. Wilcox at the conference email address: slayage.conference@gmail.com.

Submit your proposal at http://www.whedonstudies.tv/scw8–2018.html

CFP: Sp​ecial  section: Marketing  and Music in  an Age  of Digital Reproduction

May 10, 2017

Special section Guest Editors Gary Sinclair, Michael Saren and Douglas Brownlie

Background
This special section of EJM will bring together the latest research and thinking about new questions for marketing that are highlighted by the revolution in the technologies of music reproduction and consumption. These may be based on various academic disciplines such as musicology, social marketing, marketing communications, consumer behaviour, management, cultural industries, sociology, psychology and others.

Music carries significance at individual, social, political, cultural and economic levels. The industries it has spawned as a recording and performance-based ‘product’ (among others) and its positon as an atmospheric in influencing consumer behaviour (Milliman, 1982) has long attracted the attentions of marketing academics and practitioners. Beyond the economic imperative, music has provided a context in which to explore broader issues concerning social class, subcultures and resistance (Hall and Jefferson, 1976), identity and the senses (Hesmondhalgh, 2008), gender (Goulding and Saren, 2009), commercial and artistic tension (Bradshaw et al., 2006) and materiality (Magaudda, 2011).

In particular, attention to issues of music production and consumption has intensified in recent years as a consequence of disruptive technologies (e.g. peer-to peer sharing) and the apparent economic ‘decline’ of the recording industry as a consequence. The influence of new digital technologies has been more pronounced in more ‘visible’ activities like the recording industry which may explain this focus by academics, practitioners and the mainstream media.

The ‘disarticulation’ of the marketplace status quo (Giesler, 2008) initially focused attention on the morality of consumers and strategies of technological containment whilst the industry tried to get to grips with the economic uncertainty of new music technologies. However, recent research is starting to broaden the discussion further and consider new questions for marketing that are highlighted by the revolution in the technologies of music reproduction and consumption that speak to individual, social, cultural and political issues rather than just economic-centred outcomes of disruptive music technologies.

Aims of the Special Section
It is the new questions for marketing that are central to the aims of this special section. For example, what can we learn from this context about contested issues such as ownership, the sharing economy, how our consumer data is tracked and used as a means of engagement? What about the strategic use of music by users in everyday life and producers in the marketplace? What can we add to our knowledge of consumer resistance, transformation and innovation from research on the ‘consumption’ and ‘production’ of music? How well do current fashionable marketing concepts and theories, such as value co-creation, consumer engagement and consumer tribes, apply to this new music techno-marketspace?

We welcome contributions that offer new ways of understanding how music is created, reproduced, stored, accessed and shared. EJM has actively published articles from a wide range of research traditions that develop novel approaches and intellectual developments across a variety of markets, including the arts, in a cutting-edge and contemporary fashion. In continuing this tradition we seek contributions that explore how traditional contexts of marketing and music research can be reviewed and critiqued in the context of evolving digital technologies of re/production

Potential Topics
Submissions should focus some important aspect(s) of the production, use and marketing of music and associated technologies. We encourage papers and commentaries that draw from a range of methodologies, stakeholders and inter-disciplinary frameworks to address issues and questions raised here. Topics may include, but are not limited to, those listed below:

  • Music and the post-ownership economy
  • The role of marketing in music practice
  • The role of music in shaping space and place
  • Innovation and transformation: This should focus on a variety of stakeholders (artists, promoters, consumers)
  • Music communities
  • Fandom and identity
  • DIY and co-creation of music, consumer empowerment
  • Music as a facilitator of the economy
  • Materiality and intangibility
  • Nostalgia and music generations
  • Piracy and ‘ethical’ consumption of music
  • Philosophy of technological change
  • Commercial and artistic tension
  • Big data and music

Any enquiries should be directed to the guest editors: Gary Sinclair: Gary.Sinclair@dcu.ie; Michael Saren: majs1@leicester.ac.uk or Douglas Brownlie: d.z.brownlie@dundee.ac.uk

Submitted papers must be a maximum of 10,000 words and comply with the guidelines for European Journal of Marketing. Instructions can be found at www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=ejm#11

Submissions are made online through the Scholar One system. Instructions are available on the author guidelines page. Please ensure you select this special section from the drop down menu provided as you go through the submission process.

The closing date for submissions is October 31st 2017

Illustrative Readings
Bradshaw, A., McDonagh, P., and Marshall, D. (2006). The alienated artists and the political economy of organised art. Consumption Markets & Culture, 9(2): 111–117.
Dennis, N. and Macaulay (2007). “Miles ahead” – using jazz to investigate improvisation and market orientation. European Journal of Marketing, 41(5-6): 608–623.
DeNora, T. (2000). Music in everyday life. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Gamble, J. and Gilmore, A. (2013). A new era of consumer marketing?: An application of cocreational marketing in the music industry. European Journal of Marketing, 47(11/12): 18591888.
Garcia-Barididia, R., Nau, J.P., Rémy, E. (2011). Consumer resistance and anti-consumption insights from the deviant careers of French illegal downloaders. European Journal of Marketing, 45(11/12): 1789–1798.
Giesler, M. (2008). Conflict and compromise: Drama in marketplace evolution. Journal of Consumer Research, 34: 739–753.
Goulding, C. and Saren, M. (2009). Performing identity: an analysis of gender expressions at the Whitby goth festival. Consumption Markets & Culture, 12(1): 27–46.
Hall, S. and Jefferson, T. (1976). Resistance through rituals: Youth subcultures in post-war Britain. London: Hutchison.
Heidegger, M. (1977). The question concerning technology, and other essays. New York: Harper & Row.
Hesmondhalgh, D. (2008). Towards a critical understanding of music, emotion and self-identity. Consumption Markets & Culture, 11(4): 329–343.
Magaudda, P. (2011).When materiality “bites back”: Digital music consumption practices in the age of dematerialization. Journal of Consumer Culture, 11(1): 15–36.
Milliman, R. E. (1982). Using background music to affect the behaviour of supermarket shoppers. The Journal of Marketing, 46(3): 86–91.
Saren, M. (2015). ‘Buy buy Miss American Pie’ The day the consumer died. Marketing Theory, 565– 569.
Sinclair, G. and Tinson, J. (2017). Psychological ownership and music streaming consumption. Journal of Business Research, 71: 1–9.

CFP: “Football, Politics and Popular Culture”: 2017 Annual Conference of The Football Collective 

May 9, 2017

‘The Football Collective’ is a dedicated International network of over 200 academics and practitioners across a range of disciplines (Sociology, Business Management, Economics and Finance, Political
Science, Gender Studies, History, Social Media and Fan Studies, Corporate Governance, Musicology etc). Through sharp analysis and research it has provided a platform for thought provoking critical debate in football studies. 



Football has always been political. For example, on 13th May 1990, just weeks after parties favouring Croatian independence had won the majority of votes in an election, a riot between the fans of
Dinamo Zagreb and Red Star Belgrade marked a game in the Maksimir Stadium. Zvonimir Boban, the Zagreb captain and future AC Milan star kicked a police officer who had allegedly been mistreating Croatian fans. Some argue that this moment marked the end of Yugoslavia,
with a devastating Civil War following soon afterwards and many of the protagonists on that day swapping the terraces for the front lines. 




The bodies of clubs, players and fans are enmeshed with politics. Clubs have been born as a result of population upheavals and migration; have been associated with ethno-national and religious communities,
and political ideologies and parties to name but a few. In the contemporary context, football continues to be tied to political events and symbols. The ongoing movement of people into Europe has witnessed voices raised by football supporters both in support
of and opposition to migration. Racism and anti-racism practices play out on and off the pitch. Broader contemporary international political controversies such as the prohibition of the flag of the Palestinian State, the wearing of symbols such as the British
poppy or the commemoration of Irish Independence continue to spark controversy among player and fan communities alike.




Football also manifests at times in artefacts of music and broader popular culture. Football chants for example are a sophisticated socio-political activity, which connect to early forms of communication
where humans used music, chant, and dance to bond as social groups. ‘Performance’ also has a unique ability to make difference visible and audible, and songs in particular have been shown to have powerful agency in the negotiation of ‘Self’ and ‘Other’. 




We invite you to join us at the University of Limerick, on Thursday and Friday 23rd – 24th November 2017 for the Annual Conference of The Football Collective which is organized in association with
the Popular Music and Popular Culture Research Cluster @UL. “Football, Politics and Popular Culture” will bring together interdisciplinary football researchers, academics and students to share research findings, interests, stories, and methods, in order to
develop better research and collaboration across the Collective. We will also host guests from outside of the academy. In this conference, we therefore particularly welcome papers that address (but are not limited to) football and the following: 




• Migration

• Racism

• Islamophobia/anti-Muslim racism

• Ethno-national formation

• Conflict (Ethno-national, Ideological, Sectarian etc.)

• Sectarianism

• Identities

• Class politics

• Gender and Sexualities

• Fan culture 

• Political songs / chants

• Its representation in popular culture (including film and literature)



The conference is designed to offer opportunities for all to present research, research ideas, potential projects, and innovative methods of data collection or public engagement. Thus it aims to discuss
research that (a) has been undertaken, to share findings and gain insight and feedback on data analysis, representation, and potential outputs (b) is being proposed as a potential option for the Collective group to understand an existing issue or (c) has been
published, to share findings and discuss future research needs. Please submit a Word document containing your paper title, a 250 word abstract, and author information including full name, institutional affiliation, email address, and a 50-word bio to footballconference2017@ul.ie
by 6th September 2017. A maximum of 20 minutes will be allocated to each conference paper. Panel proposals (three presenters – 60 minutes) should include a 150 word overview and 250 word individual abstracts (plus author information listed above). We also
welcome proposals for workshops, film screenings, performances etc. We particularly encourage submissions from PhD scholars and early career researchers. Notifications regarding acceptance will be sent by 15th September 2017.




Conference Conveners:

Dr. James Carr, Dept. of Sociology, University of Limerick.

Dr. Martin Power, Dept. of Sociology, University of Limerick.

Dr Stephen Millar, Popular Music & Popular Culture Research Cluster, University of Limerick.



For further information please contact: footballconference2017@ul.ie

CFP: Affective Politics of Social Media

May 9, 2017

University of Turku

12–13 October, 2017

Confirmed keynote speakers: Crystal Abidin (Jönköping University / Curtin University), Kath Albury (Swinburne University of Technology), Nancy Baym (Microsoft Research New England) and Ben Light (University of Salford)

From clickbaits to fake news, heated Facebook exchanges, viral Twitter messages and Tinder swipes, the landscape of social media is rife with affective intensities of varying speeds and lengths. Affect, as the capacity to relate, impress and be impressed, creates dynamic connections between human and nonhuman bodies. Zooming in on these connections, their intensities, rhythms, and trajectories in the context of networked communications,Affective Politics of Social Media asks how affect circulates, generates value, fuels political action, feeds conflict and reconfigures the categories of gender, sexuality and race through and across social media platforms.

Multiple analytical avenues have already been laid out for doing this, from Jodi Dean’s examination of affect and drive to Tarleton Gillespie’s analysis of the politics of platforms, Adi Kuntsman’s examination of “webs of hate” and Zizi Papacharissi’s discussion of affective publics as contagious articulations of feeling that bring forth more or less temporary sense of community and connection. Building on a growing body of work on “networked affect”, this two-day symposium features keynotes exploring the affective labour of social media influencers, the automation and quantification of the intimate, the netiquette of hook-up apps and the dynamics of music stardom and fandom, and invites contributions connected to affect and social media in relation to

  • collective action and political activism
  • sexual cultures and practices
  • harassment, hate and resistance
  • affective rhythms, intensities and investments
  • popular culture and everyday life

In order to facilitate participation, the symposium has no registration fee but pre-registrations are required. To propose a paper, please send a 300-word abstract and short bio (max. 100 words) toaffective@utu.fi by June 9, 2017. Registrations will be made available in August 2017.

Organized by Department of Media Studies, IIPC, the International Institute for Popular Culture & DIGIN, Research Network on Digital Interaction at University of Turku and the Department of Gender Studies at Åbo Akademi University.

Organizing group: Susanna Paasonen, Kaisu Hynnä, Katariina Kyrölä, Mari Lehto, Mari Pajala & Valo Vähäpassi

CFP: The Soundtrack Album: Listening to Media

May 7, 2017

We invite new work that will deepen and expand the discourse about soundtrack albums. The soundtrack album endures across decades, formats (vinyl, 8-track, cassette, compact disc), and delivery systems (radio, physical media, online, streaming services). Perhaps the most obvious, and yet under-examined, media paratexts, soundtrack albums have never simply promoted a Broadway show, film, television program, video game, comic book, or recording artist. Rather, they directly shape our understanding, enjoyment, and criticism of the media texts they accompany. Soundtrack albums are themselves complex media texts whose production and reception require careful analysis. Several academic presses have expressed strong interest this project.

We seek a global address of soundtrack albums and contributions from a multi-disciplinary slate of authors, including children’s media scholars, musicologists, sound studies scholars, and media industry scholars. Authors are invited to consider the history of soundtrack albums, and how artists, industries and listeners continue to use, define, and create such audio material. Suggested topics include (but are not limited to):

  • Albums for books, broadway shows, and media beyond film and TV
  • Soundtrack albums in global contexts such as Indian filmi records
  • Disney and other children’s media albums
  • Sequel soundtrack albums such as More Dirty Dancing
  • The history of soundtrack album sales and promotion
  • Works such as Judgment Night where the film “creates” new audio texts
  • Fan-made (“unofficial”) soundtrack albums
  • Albums featuring music “inspired” by the film
  • Audio material that invites audiences to re-interpret (re-hear) audio-visual media
  • Soundtrack albums whose critical and/or financial success surpasses the film’s success
  • Albums for “concert” films such as Woodstock and Wattstax
  • Playlists, streaming audio services and emerging (re-)definitions of the soundtrack album
  • Cult soundtrack albums for cult and non-cult films
  • Synergy and cross-promotion between audio-visual texts and albums
  • “Curated” soundtrack albums by artists such as RZA and Trent Reznor
  • Soundtrack albums for imaginary films such as Barry Adamson’s Moss Side Story
  • Audio compiliations that include music from more than one film or TV program

For consideration, please provide a brief bio and 400-600 word proposal
via this Google form: http://bit.ly/soundtrackalbumproposal no later than August 1, 2017. Please contact Paul N. Reinsch (paul.n.reinsch@ttu.edu) or Laurel Westrup (lwestrup@humnet.ucla.edu) with any questions.

CFP: Backward Glances 2017: Mediating Resistance

May 6, 2017

The Screen Cultures Graduate Student Conference

Department of Radio/Television/Film, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 

September 29 & 30, 2017

Keynote Speakers: Professors Mary Celeste Kearney and Kara Keeling

Submission Deadline: June 15, 2017

In our tumultuous political landscape of “fake news” and reality TV presidents, the urgency of critically engaged media scholarship has never been greater. At a time in which many are experiencing a sense of traumatic upheaval, such work has the potential not only to enlighten the workings of media in our present moment, but to trace the history of media’s relationship to movements of resistance, rebellion, and radical change.

To this end, the theme of this year’s Backward Glances, Northwestern’s biennial graduate student media and historiography conference, is Mediating Resistance. We invite scholars to explore the role of resistance in media as well as the role of media in resistance, in historical and contemporary contexts.

Resistance manifests in forms ranging from political and activist content to formal and aesthetic innovation. These multiple inflections of resistance inform a number of interrelated questions we aim to address: What role do media play in shifting norms, broadening access to discourse, or even overthrowing regimes? How have marginalized communities used media to resist violence or imagine alternative modes of being? Alternately, how have hegemonic institutions used media to instigate violence or impose constructions of reality? In what ways are media implicated in the deepening of cultural divisions and the forms of social or political resistance they engender? As scholars, how might we engage resistant methodologies? What constitutes a “resistant reading” of a media text? What types of formal or aesthetic innovations resist norms of media-making or media consumption?

Further topics may include, but are not limited to:

  • Alternative archives

  • Media literacy and pedagogy

  • (Re)appropriation of media texts

  • Resistant spectatorship practices

  • Feminist, queer, and transgender media

  • Racial difference, racialized identities, and racism

  • Avant-garde movements

  • Postcolonial, revolutionary, and state media

  • Protest music

  • Taste and respectability politics

  • Circuit-bending

  • Affect and embodiment

  • Conspiracy theories

  • Media activism/hacktivism/slacktivism

  • Political campaigns

  • Crowdfunding, crowdsourcing

We invite scholarship from a broad range of disciplinary approaches, such as gender and sexuality studies; critical race studies; game studies; new media studies; postcolonial studies; comparative literature; historiography; film and television studies; disability studies; communications; and performance studies. Northwestern faculty will serve as respondents for graduate student panels.

Our keynote speakers will be Mary Celeste Kearney and Kara Keeling. Professor Kearney is Associate Professor of Film, Television, and Theatre and Director of the Gender Studies Program at the University of Notre Dame. Her research focuses primarily on gender, youth, and media culture. She is the author of Girls Make Media, as well as editor of The Gender and Media Reader and Mediated Girlhoods: New Explorations of Girls’ Media Culture. Her most recent book, Gender and Rock, will be published in August 2017 by Oxford University Press. She is currently completing research for her second monograph, Making Their Debut: Teenage Girls and the Teen-Girl Entertainment Market, 1938-1966. Her essay, “Sparkle: Luminosity and Post-Girl Power Media,” (Continuum 29.2) won the 2016 Katherine Singer Kovács Essay Award from the Society for Cinema and Media Studies.

Professor Keeling is Associate Professor of Cinema and Media Studies in the School of Cinematic Arts and of American Studies and Ethnicity at the University of Southern California. Keeling works in the areas of Film and Media Studies, Black Studies, Women’s and Gender Studies, Critical Theory, and Cultural Studies. Keeling’s book, The Witch’s Flight: The Cinematic, the Black Femme, and the Image of Common Sense, explores the role of cinematic images in the construction and maintenance of hegemonic conceptions of the world and interrogates the complex relationships between cinematic visibility, exploitation, and the labor required to create and maintain alternative organizations of social life. Keeling is co-editor (with Josh Kun) of Sound Clash: Listening to American Studies and (with Colin MacCabe and Cornel West) of a selection of writings by the late James A. Snead entitled European Pedigrees/ African Contagions: Racist Traces and Other Writing. Keeling’s most recent book manuscript, tentatively entitled Queer Times, Black Futures, is under contract with New York University Press.

Please send an abstract (up to 300 words) to backwardglancesconference@gmail.com by June 15, 2017. Participants will be notified by mid-July. More information about the conference can be found at www.backwardglancesconference.wordpress.com.

CFP: UCLA’s Mediascape – On Technology and Media

May 6, 2017

Deadline for submissions: June 30, 2017

The last decade has witnessed a transformation in electronic visual media. Film, television, video games and user- generated- content (UGC) are increasingly commingling. This has facilitated significant changes in the traditional models of production and consumption, leading to new practices and relationships as divergent production communities operate together.

The META section of Mediascape is looking for essays and/or video essay submissions related to Film Technology. This may relate to topics of production or exhibition, with a focus upon how advances in technology have altered longstanding practices and philosophies related to media creation as well as introducing new capabilities. This might also include the effect that the introduction of new technologies has had on narrative and form. Cinema, Television, Video Games and other forms of digital media.

Possible topics include but are not limited to:

-The current age of the professionally produced fan film as well as its increasing convergence (and potential conflict) with commercial media.

-The increasing use of computer generated imagery in creating increasingly detailed and temporally transcendent works. An example of this would be the digital inclusion of Peter Cushing and a young Carrie Fisher in Star Wars: Rogue One (2016).

-There is an ever-increasing requirement for production personnel at all levels to document their professional creative work on social media. How has this new reality based upon the need for self- promotion through the conjunction of frequently marginal employment changed production practices from the standpoint of the practitioner?

-The strategies of streaming video services, such as algorithms and real time customer data for choosing projects for internal production as they seek to cultivate their own IP.  

-How the prevalence of increasingly high quality cameras in smartphones together with networked social media platforms has changed the documentary form towards a more egalitarian structure.

The META section encourages the use of video essay or other digital media, but this is not a requirement. Submissions should be in the range of 1,000 to 3,000 words.

If you have questions about META submissions, or wish to submit a paper or project for consideration, please contact Josias Troyer at Mediascape.Meta@gmail.com with the subject header “Mediascape” META” by June 30, 2017.

CFP: Violent Feelings: Affective Intensities in Literature, Film and Culture

May 6, 2017

Deadline for submissions: December 31, 2017

From the cruel optimism of neoliberalism to the rise of white nationalism to the almost daily reminders of the precariousness of life—especially the lives of those who are othered through race, class and gender—contemporary events show the necessity of studying representations of violent feelings. While “violence” is often evoked as a metaphor for affective exchange, theories of feeling as violence and of violence as feeling remain implicit in the criticism of both violence and feeling. This special issue of LIT: Literature Interpretation Theory seeks essays that examine the relationship between violence and feeling explicitly, in order to raise new questions about emotion, embodiment, and representation.

The essays sought for this special issue seize on violent feeling as a productive avenue for further propelling and complicating the “affective turn” in literary studies. We seek essays that position themselves at the intersection of prevailing understandings of affect and violence, and explore the undertheorized ground of violent feelings in ways that affect theory has not yet fully elucidated.

Essays may explore representations of violent feelings and:

– Race, class, gender, disability

– Theories of disgust, rage, shock

– Genre, narrative or discourse (e.g. terror, horror, pornography)

– Polyvalent intensities (agitation, mourning, hysteria, anger, outrage)

– Other forms of violence (structural violence, state violence, slow violence, sexual violence)

– Brexit, the 2016 US Presidential Election, or other current events of note

LIT: Literature Interpretation Theory publishes critical essays that employ engaging, coherent theoretical perspectives and provide original, close readings of texts. Submissions must use MLA citation style and should range in length from 5,000-9,000 words in length. Please direct any questions relating to this cfp to the guest co-editor, Douglas Dowland; d-dowland@onu.edu. Submissions should be emailed to litjourn@yahoo.com (please include your contact information and a 100-200 word abstract in the body of your email). LIT: Literature Interpretation Theory also welcomes submissions for general issues.

Guest Editors: Douglas Dowland, Ohio Northern University and Anna Ioanes, Georgia Institute of Technology

Editors: Dwight Codr and Tara Harney-Mahajan

CFP: The British Isles in the Mind’s Eye: Literary Tourism and “Real” History

May 6, 2017

Deadline for submissions: September 1, 2017

What are the relationships among history, fiction, and tourism? Contributions are solicited for a collection of essays that will map the boundaries of and intersections among these discourses of “place” and its significance, with an emphasis on literary tourism and the British Isles. Essays may be weighted towards the theoretical or may be focused on studies of individual historical sites or literary authors; they may approach the subject from the disciplinary perspectives of anthropology, cultural studies, literary history, or history. Potential subjects of interest include historicality, historicity, and historical fiction; the influence of popular fiction and film on British tourism or on the marketing of historical sites to the literary tourist; the (re)creation of history in fiction and film; and the impact of tourism on historical curation.

Lexington Books, an imprint of Rowman & Littlefield, is inviting a proposal for this project. Send 500-word abstracts and one-page CVs as Word documents to the editor, LuAnn McCracken Fletcher (lmfletch@cedarcrest.edu), by 1 September 2017. Accepted abstracts will be included in the proposal to the press, with completed manuscripts needed by 1 June 2018.