Archive for the ‘Publications’ Category

CFP: Media Archaeologies Forum: Journal of Contemporary Archaeology

January 3, 2015
Media Archaeologies Forum: Journal of Contemporary Archaeology

The recent emergence of ‘media archaeologies’ is an exciting theoretical and methodological shift within media studies. In 2010, in The Routledge Companion to Film History (ed. William Guynn), Erkki Huhtamo defined ‘media archaeology’ as ‘a particular way of studying media as a historically attuned enterprise’ that involves researchers ‘”excavating” forgotten media-cultural phenomena that have been left outside the canonized narratives about media culture and history’ (203). In the same year, Jussi Parikka added that ‘media archaeology needs to insist both on the material nature of its enterprise – that media are always articulated in material, also in non-narrative frameworks whether technical media such as phonographs, or algorithmic such as databases and software networks – and that the work of assembling temporal mediations takes place in an increasingly varied and distributed network of institutions, practices and technological platforms’ (http://mediacartographies.blogspot.ca/2010/10/what-is-media-archaeology-beta.html). German media theorist and trained archaeologist, Wolfgang Ernst, describes media archaeology’s focus on the ‘nondiscursive infrastructure and (hidden) programs of media’ (2013, Digital Memory and the Archive, p. 59). If media archaeologists such as Thomas Elsaesser, Wolfgang Ernst, Lisa Gitelman, Erkki Huhtamo, Jussi Parikka, Cornelia Vismann and Siegfried Zielinski are interested in scalar change, material-discursive assemblages and deep time relations as they pertain to media technologies and networks, how might archaeologists with interests in the media actively contribute to the shaping of this field?

Alongside archaeology’s discursive travels across the humanities, most notoriously via Michel Foucault, archaeologists have long engaged with media. From Silicon Valley to Atari dumps, from the mobile phone to the media technologies of post-war astronomy and from telegraphy to the material-discursive actions of media as sensory prostheses, the global archaeological community has produced a large number of important studies of media techno-assemblages that both map specifically archaeological approaches and push at the limits of archaeology as a discipline. What are the archaeological specificities that mark out a distinct disciplinary approach to understanding media? How might the practices of media archaeologists such as Huhtamo, Parikka, et al challenge assumptions that archaeologists located within the discipline might have about their methodological and conceptual specificities? In short, where are the boundaries between media archaeologies and archaeologies of media? How are those boundaries drawn, performed and maintained? And how might we work together to ask new questions of media technologies and their relations?

This forum invites contributors to submit responses to the provocations contained in the first paragraph. The forum invites contributors to draw out key archaeological theories and practices to contribute to the rich field of media ecologies, archaeologies and ‘variatologies’ in order to explore the implications of distinct yet diverse archaeological approaches to media assemblages. Commentaries are welcomed in the form of short texts (1,000 – 3,000 words) or in any other genre suitable for print, including drawings and images. We welcome especially original thoughts and specific examples from around the world.

Commentaries will be selected in terms of originality, diversity and depth and will be published in a forthcoming Forum in Journal of Contemporary Archaeology (http://www.equinoxpub.com/journals/index.php/JCA). Deadline for submissions is 3 February 2015.

For submissions and questions, please contact Angela Piccini, a.a.piccini@bristol.ac.uk.

Advertisements

CFP: Essay Collection, “Supernatural” and the Gothic Tradition

December 30, 2014

CFP: Essay Collection, “Supernatural” and the Gothic Tradition (abstracts: 15 March 2015)

Essays are invited for an edited collection of essays focusing on the television series “Supernatural” and its relationship to the Gothic tradition. This study seeks to examine how the series is directly tied to Gothic concerns of anxiety, the monstrous, family/generational trauma, curses, and of course, the supernatural itself. In addition to these overarching themes, the series provides a rich framework with which to discuss major Gothic sub-genres such as the Comic Gothic, Suburban Gothic, Political Gothic, Female Gothic, and Postmodern/Meta Gothic. As a television show, “Supernatural” also allows connections between the Gothic and reception studies (such as comparisons of Gothic serialization on the page and screen). The collection is under contract with McFarland Press and will be part of their expanding Pop Culture series. Essays may examine any aspect of the representation of the Gothic/supernatural within the context of the series.

Themes might include:
American Gothic (particular characteristics)
Comic Gothic (the comedic episodes that recur on the show)
Religious Gothic (the involvement of angels and demons on the show)
Political Gothic (leviathans, vampires, demons, angels, world dominance, social control)
Contemporary/Postmodern Gothic (the fragmented self, shifting/multiple identities)
Gothic Television (how the series relates to this emerging field of study)
Meta Gothic and Fan Fiction

Other suggested topics:
Monsters; ghosts; vampires; revenants; shapeshifters; haunting/memories; familial anxiety; curses; cursed objects; the beast within; monstrous or victimized women; folklore, mythology and urban legends; monstrosity; hybridity; fairy tales; demons and angels; possession; identity; death and dying; the occult; mysticism; sexuality; class; race; gender.

Please send a 300-500 word abstract (or complete essay) and C.V. by 15 March 2015. All submissions will be acknowledged. If your abstract is accepted, the complete essay (5,000-6,000 words, including endnotes and bibliography) will be due 1 July 2015.

Submissions should be emailed to Melissa Makala at me.makala@gmail.com

CFP: Music and Fandom special issue, Journal of Fandom Studies

December 14, 2014

Music operates simultaneously as an object of, an accessory to, and a production of fandom. Though this phenomenon has been addressed by scholars such as Henry Jenkins, Solomon Davidoff, and Mark Duffett, the use and production of music remains a relatively ignored area of research within the field of fan studies. This leaves a wide variety of important fan practices unexplored, including music-making (filk, geek rock, wizard rock, fanvids, and cover bands), the hybridization of media in fan creations (i.e., music in fan fiction, music in fanvids, and music in LARPing and Cosplay), fan performance and recording practices, and music-making as a community-building exercise within fandom, to name a few.

The editors invite article proposals for a special issue of The Journal of Fandom Studies that critically investigate the intersections between music and fandom. As fan studies is an inherently interdisciplinary field, we welcome scholars from a variety of disciplines (musicology, ethnomusicology, media and communication studies, ethnography, social/subcultural theory, philosophy, etc.) to contribute. Possible topics include, but are not limited to, the following:
Adaptation and Labor
Amateur music-making and musical training within fandom
Fans as musical producers/fan-musicians
Music and anti-fandom
Music and convention culture
Music and cult media fandom (movies, television shows, web serials, video games, comics, novels, etc.)
Nonwestern, global, and transnational music fandoms
Popular music fandom
Music and sports fandom
Music and DIY Culture
Musical fan communities
Music as fan ritual
Music’s relationship to other fan-created media (fan fiction, fanvids, podcasts, etc.)
Music and historical (re)enactment
Music as a site for national, communal, and personal identity negotiation
Music tourism
Present and past music fandoms
To submit, please send proposals of no more than 500 words in PDF format to jfsmusicfandom@gmail.com by February 1, 2015. Up to two additional pages of musical examples and/or references may also be included, though this is not required. The proposal should include name of the author, institutional affiliation, and the title of the proposal. Accepted proposals will be notified by March 1, 2015, and completed articles will be expected by September 1, 2015, for publication in October 2016.

Jessica L. Getman
jgetman@umich.edu
University of Michigan, Ann Arbor

Aya Esther Hayashi
ahayashi@gc.cuny.edu
The Graduate Center, City University of New York

The Journal of Fandom Studies is an interdisciplinary peer-reviewed journal published by Intellect. The multi-disciplinary nature of fan studies makes the development of a community of scholars sometimes difficult to achieve. The Journal of Fandom Studies offers scholars a dedicated publication that promotes current scholarship in the fields of fan and audience studies across a variety of media. We focus on the critical exploration, within a wide range of disciplines and fan cultures, of issues surrounding production and consumption of popular media (including film, music, television, sports and gaming). The Journal of Fandom Studies aims to address key issues, while also fostering new areas of enquiry that take us beyond the bounds of current scholarship.

New issue of Journal of Fandom Studies published (Vol 2, Issue 2, October 2014)

November 7, 2014

The Journal of Fandom Studies has published a new issue – Volume 2, issue 2. The Table of Contents are as follows:

Fandom studies as I see it
Author: Henry Jenkins

Customized action figures: Multi-dimensional fandom and fannish fiction
Author: Victoria Godwin

Canon authors and fannish interaction
Author: Maria Lindgren Leavenworth

Negotiating meaning in the consumption of the past
Authors: Fiona Smith and Mary Brown

Writing with the Winchesters: Metatextual Wincest and the provisional practice of happy endings
Author: KT Torrey

Review of Doctor Who in Time and Space: Essays on Themes, Characters, History, History and Fandom, 1963–2012, Gillian I. Leitch (2013)
Author: Brandon Konecny

The webpage and article links can be found here:
http://www.intellectbooks.co.uk/journals/view-issue,id=2759/

CFP: Star Trek at 50 – special issue of Science Fiction Film and Television journal

September 24, 2014

Science Fiction Film and Television seeks submissions for a special issue on “Star Trek at 50.”

Since its premiere on September 8, 1966, Gene Roddenberry’s Star Trek has become shorthand for liberal optimism about the future, even as the franchise’s later entries have moved towards increasingly dark depictions of aging (ST II-VII), war (DS9), lifeboat ethics (VOY), and post-9/11 securitization (ENT). This internal tension has now culminated in the rebooted “Abramsverse” depiction that — while nominally directed towards reinvigorating the franchise by returning it to its youthful origins— has seen the Spock’s home planet of Vulcan destroyed by terrorists (ST) and the Federation itself corrupted by a coup from its black-ops intelligence wing (STID).

SFFTV invites fresh approaches to Star Trek media in the context of its amazing longevity and continued popularity, with possible emphases on:
* revivals, retcons, and reboots
* canon and canonicity
* Star Trek and/as “franchise”
* fan cultures, fan productions, and fan sequels
* Star Trek ephemera and paratexts
* lost episodes and unproduced scripts
* parody and pastiche (Galaxy Quest, Star Trek XXX, “The Wrath of Farrahkhan”)
* spinoff media like video games and comics
* Star Trek and politics
* Star Trek and science/technology/invention
* Star Trek and race
* Star Trek, sex, gender, and orientation
* Star Trek and disability
* Star Trek and aesthetics
* Star Trek and aging
* Star Trek’s influence on other works or on the culture at large
* Star Trek and other Roddenberry productions (The Questor Tapes, Earth: Final Conflict, Andromeda)

Articles of 6,000-9,000 words should be formatted using MLA style and according to the submission guidelines available on our website. Submissions should be made via our online system at http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com:80/lup-sfftv. Articles not selected for the special issue will be considered for future issues of SFFTV.Any question should be directed to the editors, Mark Bould (mark.bould@gmail.com), Sherryl Vint (sherryl.vint@gmail.com), and Gerry Canavan (gerrycanavan@marquette.edu). The deadline for submissions is September 1, 2015, with anticipated publication in Star Trek’s 50th anniversary year.

Science Fiction Film and Television is a peer-reviewed journal published three times a year by Liverpool University Press. Edited by Mark Bould (UWE), Gerry Canavan (Marquette) and Sherryl Vint (UC RIverside), with an international board of advisory editors, it encourages dialogue among the scholarly and intellectual communities of film studies, sf studies and television studies. We invite submissions on all areas of sf film and television, from Hollywood productions to Korean or Turkish sf film, from Sci-Fi Channel productions to the origins of SF TV in Rod Brown of the Rocket Rangers or The Quatermass Experiment. We encourage papers which consider neglected texts, propose innovative ways of looking at canonical texts, or explore the tensions and synergies that emerge from the interaction of genre and medium. We publish articles (6000-8000 words), book and DVD reviews (1000-2000 words) and review essays (up to 5000 words), as well as archive entries (up to 5000 words) on theorists (which introduce the work of key and emergent figures in sf studies, television studies or film studies) and texts (which describe and analyse little-known or unduly neglected films or television series).

New issue (Vol 17, Sept 2014) of Transformative Works and Cultures journal published

September 15, 2014

A new issue (Volume 17) of Transformative Works and Cultures journal has now been published. You can read it here:

http://journal.transformativeworks.org/index.php/twc/issue/view/18

The Table of Contents are as follows:

Theory
Redefining genderswap fan fiction: A Sherlock case study
Ann McClellan

How to do things with fan subs: Media engagement as subcultural capital in anime fan subbing
Douglas Schules

Bull in a china shop: Alternate reality games and transgressive fan play in social media franchises
Burcu S. Bakioglu

Praxis
Twinship, incest, and twincest in the Harry Potter universe
Vera Cuntz-Leng

Iron Man in Chinese boys’ love fandom: A story untold
John Wei

Fan edits and the legacy of The Phantom Edit
Joshua Wille

Fan fiction metadata creation and utilization within fan fiction archives: Three primary models
Shannon Fay Johnson

Symposium
Fan fiction and midrash: Making meaning
Rachel Barenblat

Wordplay, mindplay: Fan fiction and postclassical narratology
Veerle Van Steenhuyse

Why they won’t save us: Political dispositions in the conflicts of superheroes
Woody Evans

Preserving digital remix video
Rebecca Fraimow

Performances of innocence and deviance in Disney cosplaying
Maria Patrice Amon

Fandom and the fourth wall
Jenna Kathryn Ballinger

Interview
Exploring fandom, social media, and producer/fan interactions: An interview with Sleepy Hollow’s Orlando Jones
Lucy Bennett, Bertha Chin

Spreadable media: Creating value and meaning in a networked culture
Louisa Ellen Stein

Review
Fanged fan fiction: Variations on Twilight, True Blood, and The Vampire Diaries, by Maria Lindgren Leavenworth and Malin Isaksson
Anne Gilbert

Manga’s cultural crossroads, edited by Jaqueline Berndt and Bettina Kümmerling-Meibauer
Nicolle Lamerichs

Popular music fandom: Identities, roles, and practices, edited by Mark Duffett
Lucy Bennett

CFP: Joy Devotion: The Importance of Ian Curtis and fan culture

September 13, 2014

JOY DEVOTION:
The Importance of Ian Curtis and fan culture CFP
New book to be released exclusively on Headpress
Joy Devotion: The Importance of Ian Curtis and fan culture in a 2.0 Economy will explore the lasting legacy in the fan, post-punk and dot com economy of Joy Division lead singer Ian Curtis, and what such dedication says about the larger issues facing us in a modern world. Essays on Curtis, exploring ideas of memory, death, technology, fandom and secular religion will be complimented by photos taken at the Ian Curtis Memorial Stone every month for a year, beginning fall 2009 through 2010. Stakeholders in the Curtis legacy, from fans to artists, will also contribute their personal insights, allowing for intimate and never before allowed access to the very people who Curtis has continued to influence and inspire long past his untimely death in 1980.
We are looking for contributions in the following areas:
• The growing importance of Joy Division and Curtis since his death
• Bootlegs, bootleg culture and ideas of duplication, replication and distribution;
• On-line communities, social media and the evolution of fan connection via technology
• Joy Division tribute bands and or acts
•Ideas of Englishness as exported via Joy Division to the rest of the world
• How the images of Joy Division and Ian Curtis have played a role in memory, history and iconography
• Military and political messaging in the band’s name, ideals and legacy
• Films about and featuring Joy Division
• The non-touring band- how Joy Division became a global phenomena without international touring
•Memory, fandom and secular religion
Other ideas are welcome. Any questions or inquiries please send to jkomedia@gmail.com.
Please send a 500 word abstract of your ideas to jkomedia@gmail.com by November 1, 2014 for consideration. We will contact all interested parties by February 1, 2015, with a decision in regards to inclusion.
A full chapter will consist of 2,000-3,000 words, and will be due no later than May 1, 2015.

CFP: Fan Studies in the Classroom

September 4, 2014

Fan Studies in the Classroom strives to connect the popular with the scholarly, using popular and fan cultural artifacts to engage student interest, motivate student research, and cast a new light on learning objectives. Increasingly, teachers in all disciplines incorporate fan creations, remix concepts, and media studies approaches in the classroom. These exercises range from using fan materials as examples, to having students study remix works, to asking students to rewrite canon.
Instructors from all institutions and serving varieties of student populations are invited to submit abstracts for essays about using remix/fan studies approaches in the classroom, with a focus on practice and instruction. Fan Studies in the Classroom will be an interdisciplinary, edited collection.

University of Iowa Press has expressed interest in publishing the volume. Authors of selected abstracts will be asked to write a 5,000 word essay and invite a student to submit a response to the assignment described.

Abstracts of 250-500 words
Short biographical statement
Current MLA guidelines, please no endnotes.
Submit to Katherine Howell khowell@gwu.edu by December 18, 2014.

Call for Chapter Proposals: Public Relations and Participatory Culture: Fandom, Social Media and Community Engagement

August 12, 2014

CALL FOR CHAPTER PROPOSALS: PUBLIC RELATIONS AND PARTICIPATORY CULTURE: FANDOM, SOCIAL MEDIA, AND COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT.

We invite submissions of chapter proposals for Public Relations and Participatory Culture: Fandom, Social Media, and Community Engagement. This edited volume, to be published by Routledge in 2015, will examine the relationships and interactions between fans and organizational public relations efforts.

The purpose of this volume is to integrate stakeholder and publics theories with those of participatory cultures and media studies/fan perspectives, and to add new, fresh insight into the public relations discipline’s concept of publics and segmentation. The chapters selected for inclusion in this volume will explore challenges, opportunities, and the diversity of fan activity and relationships from a variety of perspectives, including international and intercultural. The situations analyzed will also reflect the diversity of PR situations that involve fan-publics, i.e. not limited to entertainment products. These chapters will help to answer the question: How, as practitioners, can we create meaningful, ethical, and mutually-beneficial relationships between brands/organizations and fans?

We welcome submissions from educators and practitioner on a variety of topics, including (but not limited to):
• Power, co-creation, messages, and fans
• Application of PR theories to audience studies
• Connecting fan research and fan studies theories to the segmentation of publics
• Participatory culture, transmedia, and engagement/active publics
• Community management, social media, and fan publics
• Brand community management
• Fan resistance
• New models for segmenting engaged publics
• Researching online fan-brand communities
• Circuit of culture and segmentation of fans and publics
• Crowdsourcing, crowd-funding, and activating publics

Scholars and practitioners interested in submitting chapter proposals should include a 250-word abstract and a one-page outline of your proposed chapter to co-editor Amber Hutchins at ahutch13@kennesaw.edu. Chapter proposals are due no later than September 1, 2014.

Questions can be directed to coeditors Amber L. Hutchins, Kennesaw State University (ahutch13@kennesaw.edu) or Natalie Tindall, Georgia State University (drnatalietjtindall@gmail.com)

CFP: Diffractions journal -special issue – Popping the Question: The Question of Popular Culture

August 8, 2014

Call for Articles

Diffractions – Graduate Journal for the Study of Culture

POPPING THE QUESTION: THE QUESTION OF POPULAR CULTURE

Deadline for article submissions: November 30, 2014​

As a concept, the popular – or popular culture for that matter – has never ceased to be debatable and ambivalent. Although it has come to occupy a particular place under the spotlight over the past decades within the broad study of culture, such apparently privileged position has not deprived it of the manifold ambiguities, complexities or misconceptions that have often involved its general understanding (John Storey, 2012; Angela McRobbie, 1994; Andrew Ross, 1989; John Fiske, 1989).

Following its emergence within the context of the processes of industrialization and the changes they brought about, namely in terms of cultural relations and the development of the capitalist market economy, the concept of popular culture was, for a considerable period of time, not only utterly rejected by intellectuals and scholars alike, but also denied any possibility of constituting a serious and valid topic for academic debate. Up until the mid twentieth-century, popular culture was often equated to a poor and simplistic form of entertainment and pleasure, and was even deemed morally and ethically questionable, not to mention aesthetically. However, and particularly after the 1950s, new perspectives would soon alter this perception in very significant ways, especially with the emergence of Cultural Studies and the influence their project had on both sides of the Atlantic (Lawrence Grossberg, 1997). From severe condemnation, popular culture quickly evolved into a discourse of positive reception and celebration, which resulted from critical work developed inside the academia, but also popular demand outside it.

The concept of the popular was then adopted both as an intrinsic feature, and as topic in its own right of artistic creation developed under the sign of pop. From pop art to pop music, a new understanding of culture has been put forth, building from what is embedded in the ambivalence of the popular and its many possibilities of intersection with new artistic forms of expression.

After the first decade of the twenty-first century, popular culture finds itself at a crossroads: has the concept been drained of its meaning because of its overwhelming popularity? After the euphoria around the popular, what afterlife can be expected from it? Should we still be discussing the popular as opposed to high and folk culture? And where and how do pop art forms intersect with the current notion of the popular?

Themes to be addressed by contributors may include but are not restricted to the following:
§ Popular Culture in Theory
§ Life and Afterlife of Popular Culture
§ Popular, Power and Politics
§ Popular Culture: Globalization, Centres and Peripheries
§ Material Culture
§ Popular music studies
§ Celebrity culture and Fandom: The Dynamics of Popularity
§ Contemporary Cinema and Digital Culture
§ 2.0 and Convergence practices§ Youth cultures, Subcultures, Scenes and Tribes
§ Retromania, Nostalgia and Authenticity
§ Pop and Popular: Overlap, Dissemblance and Divergence
§ Popular Culture and the Practices of Everyday Life
§ Folklore, Tradition and Preservation§ National Identities and Transnational Circulations
§ Cultural memory and popular culture
§ Fashion and luxury
§ Television and the Seriality of Popular Culture
§ Feminism, Postfeminism and Popular Culture
§ Popular Culture and Masculinities
§ Queering Popular Culture
§ Games Culture and New Media
§ Graffiti, Street Art and Urban Policies
§ Creative Industries and Cultural Economy

We look forward to receiving full articles of no more than 20 A4 pages (not including bibliography) and a short bio of about 150 words by November 30, 2014 at the following address: submissions@diffractions.net.
DIFFRACTIONS also accepts book reviews that may not be related to the issue’s topic. If you wish to write a book review, feel free to check the books available athttp://www.diffractions.net/books-for-review and contact us at reviews@diffractions.net.

Diffractions is the international, online and peer-reviewed journal of the doctoral program in Culture Studies at the Catholic University of Portugal. Find us online at http://www.diffractions.net and http://www.facebook.com/diffractionsjournal.