Archive for the ‘Uncategorized’ Category

CFP: STAR WARS, Expanded Universe, legend, canon? « I thought he was a myth! »

May 29, 2017

STAR WARS, Expanded Universe, legend, canon? « I thought he was a myth! »

Edited by Marc Joly-Corcoran (University of Montreal) and Laurent Jullier (New Sorbonne University)

Theme

Since Disney bought Lucasfilm in 2012, the Star Wars universe has never been so disrupted. George Lucas is no longer involved as a producer, for better or worse. In 2014, in what seems to be a marketing move that mainly serves to distinguish what would be now officially “canon”, the status of the Expanded Universe (the EU: novels, video games, comic books) was classified “legend”. Consequently, apart from the fan productions, and all the fanon, SW post-2014 stories are officially “canons”.

That being said, one can only speculate about the impact of this diegetic change for the fans and the future Lucasfilm productions. Indeed, the EU is becoming a fabulous paradigm from which new creators are free to draw any ideas they feel necessary, without any constraint nor pressure to use ‘this or that’ to respect a pre-established continuity set in the EU, which is no more canon. Nevertheless, many fans have invested a significant amount of time reading all the novels and comics, covering 20,000 years of history in “a galaxy far far away”. Now, we could push this ‘legend logic’ further: why could the infamous prequels, directed by George Lucas, not be classified “legend” too, intradiegetically acknowledged by the characters in SW? The same could apply for the original trilogy. Isn’t it Rey who says about Luke Skywalker: “I thought he was a myth!”

Exclusively devoted to Star Wars, this issue aims to analyze the impacts of the upheavals following this diegetic change:    

– On the official productions (two feature films, The Force Awakens and Rogue One, the animated Star Wars Rebels series, books, video games, etc.)

– On the fan creations: what impact these films had on their audiovisual works (fanfilm), fanart or fanfic, which they continue to produce since their release?

– On the reception side: how were the last two feature films received and appreciated according to the audience? – connoisseurs, fans of the original trilogy, newcomers, beginners, etc. How are the six original opus of the saga now “revised”? What consequences changing the status of the EU to “legend” really had on their “image” or “value”?

This issue seeks well-researched papers that address topics such as (but not exclusively):

  • Amnesia in SW screenplays and retroactive continuity
  • Revival, remake, reboot, soft reboot: why the fad?
  • Transmedia as a way for saving screenplays, and retcon
  • The relevance of the notions of legitimacy, “canon” or “non-canon”, “officiality” and authenticity in a fictional universe
  • Revisionism through the history of reception, specifically concerning Episode IV released in 1977
  • Case studies: The Force Unleashed, KOTOR
  • Case studies: Rogue One, marketing, trailers and reshoot
  • Should The Force Awakens be called New Hope 2.0?
  • Fans’ contributions to the Expanded Universe (Fan theories, fanfilm, fanfic, fanart, etc.)

How to submit?

Please send an abstract, between 300 and 500 words (excluding references), in English or French, by August 1st, 2017, to    marc.joly@umontreal.ca  AND laurent.jullier@sorbonne-nouvelle.fr

The abstract must specify the topic and the object(s) of study, along with the preferred methodology.  Don’t forget to indicate key bibliographical references, your name, email address, and your institutional affiliation.

Selected contributors will be advised by email by the end of June 2017. Full papers will be submitted by the end of september 2017 (anonymized). The issue will be released during the beginning of 2018.

Editorial rules

Kinephanos is a peer-reviewed journal. Each article is evaluated by double-blind peer review. Kinephanos does not retain exclusive rights of published texts. However, material submitted must not have been previously published elsewhere. Future versions of the texts published in other periodicals must reference Kinephanos as its original source.

For the editorial guidelines, refer to the section Editorial Guidelines.

http://www.kinephanos.ca/2017/star-wars-univers-etendu-legende-canon-i-thought-he-was-a-myth-star-wars-expanded-universe-legend-canon/

Kinephanos accepts papers in English and in French.

CFP: Breaking out of the Box: Critical Essays on the Cult TV Show Supernatural

May 29, 2017

Lisa Macklem and Dominick Grace seek proposals for a refereed collection of essays on the CW cult horror show Supernatural.

“What’s in the box?” Dean Winchester asks in “The Magnificent Seven,” episode one of the third season of Supernatural, to the befuddlement of his brother Sam and their avuncular mentor Bobby Singer, but to the delight of fans who revel in the show’s wry meta elements. Dean is of course quoting Detective Mills, Brad Pitt’s character in the thriller Se7en (1995), directed by David Fincher. Throughout its twelve-year run (to date), Supernatural has revelled in breaking out of the limitations usually implied by a television show, breaking out of the box in numerous ways. Acknowledging the popularity of the meta-play in the show, current showrunner Andrew Dabb promised the most meta-finale ever for the season twelve finale. One of the most noteworthy examples of this predilection is the extensively meta elements of the season five apocalypse plotline, which featured the character Carver Edlund (his name derived from series writers Jeremy Carver and Ben Edlund) in several episodes. Edlund is a novelist who has written supposed works of fiction that in fact document Sam and Dean Winchester’s lives, thoroughly breaking the fourth wall. Edlund is the pseudonym of Chuck Shurley—who turns out to be God, making one of his rare mainstream television appearances. However, this meta plot element represents only one of the myriad ways Supernatural has broken out of the box. Season five, episode eight (“Changing Channels”), transports Sam and Dean into the worlds of several television shows, while season six, episode fifteen, “The French Mistake,” carried the conceit further, having Sam and Dean visit the “real” world, in which they are characters in the TV show Supernatural. Season eight and nine feature as main villain the appropriately-named Metatron, the scribe of God trying to write himself into the position of God—in effect plotting in both senses of the word. Season eight also featured, in episode 8 (“Hunteri Heroici”), Warner Brothers style cartoon gimmickry, and the upcoming season thirteen promises an animated crossover episode with Scooby Doo. Season ten’s 200th episode is yet another recursive metanarrative, featuring a highschool student trying to mount a musical adaptation of the Carver Edlund novels. In short, despite its horror trappings, Supernatural has been decidedly postmodern in its liberal use of pastiche, meta, intertextuality, and generic slippage. This collection is interested in exploring the ways Supernatural breaks boundaries. Topics of potential interest include but are not limited to

 

  • Explicitly meta elements in Supernatural
  • Supernatural and fandom: interpenetrations
  • God, Metatron, and other Supernatural authors
  • Role and role-playing
  • Generic slippage (comedy; found footage; the musical episode)
  • Allusion and intertext in Supernatural
  • Canonicity
  • Non-Supernatural (e.g. the episodes with no fantasy elements)
  • Supernatural and genre TV
  • reality and retcon: how the show has shifted and redefined its own rules
  • casting and self-consciousness (e.g. the use of celebrity guest stars such as Linda Blair, Rick Springfield, etc.)
  • Importance of music throughout the show

 

Proposals of 300-500 words should be submitted to Lisa Macklem (lmacklem1@gmail.com) or Dominick Grace (dgrace2@uwo.ca) by October 1 2017. Final papers should be between 5,000 and 7,000 words long and written in conformity with MLA style and will be due by May 1 2018. McFarland has expressed interest in this collection, with a contract forthcoming.

Call for Papers – Otherness: Essays and Studies 6.1

May 29, 2017

The peer-reviewed, open-access e-journal Otherness: Essays and Studies is now accepting submissions for its special issue: Otherness and Transgression in Fan and Celebrity Studies, Autumn 2017.

Otherness: Essays and Studies publishes research articles from and across different scholarly disciplines that critically examine the concepts of otherness and alterity. We particularly appreciate dynamic cross-disciplinary study.

The notions of otherness and transgression play an essential part in the cultural work and practices celebrities and fandoms perform inasmuch as these concepts are inseparable from the celebrity and fan cultural processes of social in/exclusion, identification and dissociation, uniformity and diversification, and forces both drawing and disrupting demarcations between normalcy and deviance. Otherness and transgression constitute pertinent sites for critical exploration within the two overlapping fields of research, Fan and Celebrity Studies.

A complex and multivalent term, otherness is conventionally signaled by markers of “difference” and the unknown. As difference remains a condition for any determinate sense of identity, otherness is also inevitably implicit and complicit in considerations of subjectivity, identity, and sameness. Likewise, in the field of Fan and Celebrity culture – where categories such as class, gender, race, sexuality, and age dynamically intersect and interact in manifold ways – the identity work, social meanings, and cultural preferences informing both these cultures’ production and consumption of cultural and media texts are also constantly negotiated. Reflexive of the values, biases, and tensions of the social body, they are useful indicators of contemporary configurations and devices for othering; for example, the ways in which the discourses of immorality, pathology, monstrosity, impropriety, and cultism, among others, inform the construction of difference, and function as vehicles for othering that additionally cut diagonally across various imbricating “-isms,” such as racism, heterosexism, ageism, ableism, and lookism.

As difference often implies the perception of deviance, otherness is accompanied by the constant impending threat of transgression, to undo and redraw the differentiating limits determining the provisional identities of entities, behaviors, and bodies. While transgression refers to a violation and exceeding of bounds, it also ambiguously realizes and completes these boundaries as it helps define them and reaffirms a given social order by designating the illicit. This dialectic of the de/stabilizing effects of transgression summons further inquiry in relation to fandoms and celebrity cultures.

Fan and Celebrity Studies are in need of a reappraisal in which the new fickle and permeable boundaries between identities, cultural practices, private and public spheres, products and consumers, celebrity and fan bodies, intimacy and estrangement are investigated. Refracting otherness and transgression from overlapping prisms, the pleasures, representations, productions, and affects of celebrity and fan cultures opens up a fruitful and invigorating space for further research. We envision this special issue on Otherness and Transgression in Fan and Celebrity Studies to be one such place.

 

WELCOME TOPICS INCLUDE BUT ARE NOT LIMITED TO THE FOLLOWING:

The Intersection of Celebrity and Fan Studies

Sex, Gender, Sexual Differing, and Queering the Fan / Celebrity Body

Cross-Over Celebrities; Ethnicity, Hybridity, and Fandom in Transcultural Contexts

Celebrity Representations of Dis/ability and through Fan Works

The Intersectionalities of Social Categories in Celebrity and Fan Cultures

Notoriety, Infamy, Scandal, Deviance, and Excess Social Media and the Construction of Celebrity as Other

The Construction of Otherness in Fandom and Fan Works

Monstrosity, the Abject, and Uncanny in Fan Fiction, Fandoms, and Celebrityhood

Pathology, Addiction, Cultism, Confession, and Therapy

Mashing and Vidding: Viral and Violating

Authenticity, Secrecy, Intimacy, and Publicity

Post-feminist Celebrity Narratives and Cultural Forms

Power, Prosumerism, and Participatory Culture

New Modes of Self-Other Relations within Para-social Contexts

Fan and/or Celebrity Shaming

The (Im)Material Other Worlds of Fandoms and the Alternative Spaces of Fan Communities

 

Articles should be between 5,000 – 8,000 words. All electronic submissions should be sent via email with Word document attachment formatted to Chicago Manual of Style standards to the issue editor Dr. Matthias Stephan at otherness.research@gmail.com

 

Further information: http://www.otherness.dk/journal/

 

The deadline for submissions is Monday, September 15, 2017.

CFP: The 8th Biennial Slayage Conference on the WhedonversesFlorence, Alabama, US / Summer 2018

May 12, 2017

Slayage: The Journal of Whedon Studies, the Whedon Studies Association, and conveners Stacey Abbott and Cynthia Burkhead invite proposals for the eighth biennial Slayage Conference on the Whedonverses (SCW8). Devoted to Joss Whedon’s creative works, SCW8 will be held on the campus of the University of North Alabama, Florence, Alabama, June 21-24, 2018. The conference will be organized by Local Arrangements Chair Cynthia Burkhead, along with Slayage alumns Anissa Graham, Stephanie Graves, Jennifer Butler Keeton, and Brenna Wardell
We welcome proposals of 200-300 words (or an abstract of a completed paper) on any aspect of Whedon’s television and web texts (Buffy the Vampire SlayerAngelFireflyDr. Horrible’s Sing-Along BlogDollhouse,Marvel’s Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.); his films (SerenityThe Cabin in the WoodsMarvel’s The AvengersMuch Ado About Nothing, The Avengers: Age of Ultron, In Your Eyes); his comics (e.g. FrayAstonishing X-MenRunaways;Sugarshock!Buffy the Vampire Slayer Season EightNine, and TenAngel: After the FallAngel & Faith Season Nine and Ten); or any element of the work of Whedon and his collaborators. Additionally, a proposal may address paratexts, fandoms, or Whedon’s extracurricular—political and activist—activities, such as his involvement with Equality Now or the 2016 US elections.  Since Florence, Alabama is one of the four cities making up the Shoals, and the area is rich in music history (the Muscle Shoals Sound, W.C. Handy) as well as Native American History, we look forward to papers addressing these subjects as they relate to the Whedonverses. Multidisciplinary approaches (literature, philosophy, political science, history, communications, film and television studies, women’s studies, religion, linguistics, music, cultural studies, art, and others) are all welcome. A proposal/abstract should demonstrate familiarity with already-published scholarship in the field, which includes dozens of books, hundreds of articles, and over a fifteen years of the blind peer-reviewed journal Slayage. Proposers may wish to consult Whedonology: An Academic Whedon Studies Bibliography, housed with Slayage atwww.whedonstudies.tv.

An individual paper is strictly limited to a maximum reading time of 20 minutes, and we encourage, though do not require, self-organized panels of three presenters. Proposals for workshops, roundtables, or other types of sessions are also welcome. Submissions by graduate and undergraduate students are invited; undergraduates should provide the name, email, and phone number of a faculty member willing to consult with them (the faculty member does not need to attend). Proposals should be submitted online through this SCW8 webpage (see below) and will be reviewed by program chairs Stacey Abbott, Cynthia Burkhead, and Rhonda V. Wilcox. Submissions must be received by Monday, 8 January 2018. Decisions will be made by 5 March 2018. Questions regarding proposals can be directed to Rhonda V. Wilcox at the conference email address: slayage.conference@gmail.com.

Submit your proposal at http://www.whedonstudies.tv/scw8–2018.html

CFP: At home with horror? Terror on the small screen, University of Kent, UK, 27-28 Oct 2017

April 19, 2017

The Melodrama Research Group presents:

At home with horror? Terror on the small screen

27th-28th October 2017

University of Kent

Keynote speaker: Dr Helen Wheatley (University of Warwick)

CALL FOR PAPERS

The recent horror output on TV and the small screen challenges what Matt Hills found to be the overriding assumption ‘that film is the [horror] genre’s ‘natural’ home’ (Hills 2005, 111). Programmes such as American Horror StoryPenny Dreadful and The Walking Dead are aligned to ‘‘quality TV’, yet use horror imagery and ideas to present a form and style of television that is ‘not ordinary’’ (Johnston 2016, 11). Developments in industrial practices and production technology have resulted in a more spectacular horror in the medium, which Hills argues is the ‘making cinematic’ of television drama (Hills 2010, 23). The generic hybridity of television programmes such as Whitechapel, and Ripper Street allow conventions of the horror genre to be employed within the narrative and aesthetics, creating new possibilities for the animation of horror on the small screen. Series such as Bates Motel and Scream adapt cinematic horror to a serial format, positioning the small screen (including terrestrial, satellite and online formats) as the new home for horror.

The history of television and horror has often displayed a problematic relationship. As a medium that operates within a domestic setting, television has previously been viewed as incompatible with ‘authentic’ horror. Television has been approached as incapable of mobilizing the intense audience reactions associated with the genre and seen as a medium ‘restricted’ in its ability to scare and horrify audiences partly due to censorship constraints (Waller 1987) and scheduling arrangements. Such industrial practices have been seen as tempering the genre’s aesthetic agency resulting in inferior cinematic imitations or, ‘degraded made-for-TV sequels’ (Waller 1987, 146). For Waller, the technology of television compounded the medium’s ability to animate horror and directed its initial move towards a more ‘restrained’ form of the genre such as adapting literary ghost stories and screening RKO productions of the 1940s (Ibid 1987). Inferior quality of colour and resolution provided the opportunity to suggest rather than show. Horror, then, has presented a challenge for television: how can the genre be positioned in such a family orientated and domesticated medium? As Hills explains, ‘In such a context, horror is conceptualised as a genre that calls for non- prime-time scheduling… and [thus] automatically excluded from attracting a mass audience despite the popularity of the genre in other media’ (Hills 2005, 118).

Helen Wheatley’s monograph, Gothic Television (2006), challenges the approach of television as a limiting medium for horror, and instead focuses on how the domestic setting of the television set is key to its effectiveness.  Focusing on the female Gothic as a domestic genre, Wheatley draws a lineage from early literary works, to the 1940s cycle of Gothic women films and Gothic television of the 1950s onwards. Wheatley argues for the significance of the domestic setting in experiencing stories of domestic anxiety for, ‘the aims of the Gothic drama made for television [are] to suggest a congruence between the domestic spaces on the screen and the domestic reception context’ (Wheatley 2006, 191).

Developments in small screen horror are not restricted to contemporary output. In his work on the cultural history of horror, Mark Jancovich argues that it was on television in the 1990s where key developments in the genre were taking place (Jancovich 2002). Taking Jancovich’s work as a cue, Hills develops his own approach to the significance of horror television of the 1990s. Hills citesBuffy the Vampire Slayer and The X Files as examples of programmes striving to mobilise the genre’s more graphic elements while existing as a ‘high-end’ cultural product: ‘authored’ TV that targeted a niche fan audience (Hills 2005, 126).

Taking these recent developments into account, the aim of this conference is to engage with such advances. Can we say that it is on the small screen where critical and creative innovations in horror are now being made? How has the expansion of satellite television and online sites impacted the genre? How has the small screen format developed the possibilities of horror? Is the recent alignment with ‘quality TV’ evidence of horror’s new mainstream status? This conference will also reflect on seminal works on television horror and revisit the history of the genre. In addressing these questions the conference will underline the importance of the small screen for horror, within the study of the genre and of the medium, and ask: is the small screen now the home of horror?

Topics can include but are not limited to:

  • The seasons and horror on the small screen
  • Gothic television
  • Gender and horror
  • Historical figures and events in small screen horror
  • Small screen horror as an ‘event’
  • Adaptation from cinema to small screen ‘re-imaginings’
  • Production contexts
  • Censorship and the small screen
  • Serialisation and horror production
  • National television production of horror
  • The impact of Netflix and Amazon Prime
  • TV history and horror
  • Literary adaptations
  • Children’s TV and horror
  • Genre hybridity
  • Fandom
  • Teen horror
  • Stardom and horror

Please submit proposals of 400 words, along with a short biographical note (250 words) to horrorishome@gmail.com by Friday 30th June. We welcome 20 minute conference papers as well as submissions for creative work or practice-as-research including, but not limited to, short films and video essays.

Conference organisers: Katerina Flint-Nicol and Ann-Marie Fleming

https://tvhomeofhorror.wordpress.com/

https://twitter.com/Homewithhorror

 

CFP: Fan Studies 2017 Midwest Popular Culture Association Conference, Oct 18-22, 2017 St. Louis, MO, USA

April 19, 2017

FAN STUDIES

2017 Midwest Popular Culture Association Conference

Wednesday-Sunday, October 18-22, 2017

St. Louis, MO, USA

Hayatt Regenct St. Louis at the Arch

Deadline: April 30, 2017

Submissions.mpcaaca.org

Topics can include, but are not limited to fan fiction, multi-media fanproduction, fan communities, fandom of individual media texts, sports fandom, or the future of fandom.  Case studies are also welcome.

Special call for Fan Fiction writers willing to share their work or portions of their work.

Please upload 250 word abstract proposals on any aspect of Fan Studies to theFan Studies area, http://submissions.mpcaaca.org/.

More information about the conference can be found athttp://www.mpcaaca.org/

Please note the availability of graduate student travel grants:http://mpcaaca.org/conference/travel-grants/.

 

Please include name, affiliation, and e-mail address with the 250 word abstract. Also, please indicate in your submission whether your presentation will require an LCD Projector and/or Audio hookup.

Any questions? Please email Katie Wilson at KateMarieWilson@gmail.com

Audiences 2017: A Bournemouth University/ CSJCC Workshop, 3 May 2017, Bournemouth, UK

April 6, 2017

Audiences 2017: A Bournemouth University/ CSJCC Workshop

Wednesday May 3rd 2017, 09:00 – 17:30.

This event is free, but spaces are limited. Interested parties please email Dr. William Proctor to book places (bproctor@bournemouth.ac.uk).

Bournemouth University’s Centre for the Study of Journalism, Culture and Community (CSJCC) cordially invites you to Audiences 2017, a workshop including activities and presentations. I am pleased to announce the following scholars will be speaking at the event and sharing their experience of audience research, addressing key issues such as methodology, ethics and project design.

Professor Martin Barker (Aberystwyth University):

“Not just any old data”: the role of theories and methods in audience research.

 Dr. Ranjana Das (University of Leicester):

The Audiences of “Offensive” TV: Offence, Affect and Publicness in Front of Provocative Screens (drawn from research conducted by Ranjana Das and Ann Graefer, and forthcoming book, Provocative Screens, co-authored with Anne Graefer).

Dr. Jim Pope (Bournemouth University)

Reader response theory and practice, applied to readers of hypertext fiction

Dr. Richard McCulloch (Huddersfield University) & Dr. William Proctor (Bournemouth University):

The Force Re-Awakens: The World Star Wars Project

The morning will be dedicated to presentations, each focusing on individual research projects. Following lunch, we will then proceed to participatory workshop exercises designed to address the ‘whys’ and the ‘hows’ of audience research. The following overview provides a précis of workshop activity (with thanks to Professor Barker and Dr. Das).

Audience research is at least to a small extent the awkward cousin of much else in media and cultural studies: arriving on bad days, asking difficult questions, making life complicated for the ‘family’. Not accepting favoured ‘theories’. Demanding good empirical evidence for ‘obvious’ propositions. But audience research is also now well-established and practised with dedication by an increasing number of people in our field.  It has its dedicated Journals, its academic sections of major organisations, even occasional specialist conferences.  Understanding what we do, why, and how – and of course with what challenges and difficulties – is surely important.

The aim of this Workshop is to give you an opportunity to think through how and why you might design a piece of audience research on something pretty current and surely very important. In the first part of the day, you will have heard four presentations from people who, in different ways, have practised various kinds of audience research.  In the afternoon, we will hope to make this as concrete and exciting as we feel it to be, by taking you through some of the processes that we go through, as we plan and design our research.  The topic we’ve chosen to build this around is the nature and rise of the ‘new populism’.

A lot of important work (both journalistic and academic) has been done on this topic, looking at the rise of specific websites, Fox News and radio jock shows, and social media platforms that have played a part in this. There has also been valuable work on the sociology of the phenomenon: the rust belt in America, the former industrial towns in the UK, and so on.  And – more uncertainly – there has been work on the rise of new forms of racism, which is also part of the same phenomenon.  But a huge amount remains unknown.  So, what might be contributed if we were in a position to explore the media choices and involvements of those attracted to the ‘new populism’?

  • What specifically could ‘audience research’ contribute that other kinds of research could not – however hard we might think it will be to do it in practice?
  • What questions would we be aiming to ask – and how might we in theory go about answering them?
  • What would be the biggest barriers to doing the research – and how might those barriers be circumvented?
  • What might be our own assumptions as we approach the task, and what might we do to stop these blocking us and making us prejudge?

 

 

Call for Submissions: The Popular Culture Studies Journal

April 6, 2017

Call for Submissions: The Popular Culture Studies Journal

The Popular Culture Studies Journal is an academic, peer-reviewed, refereed journal for scholars, academics, and students from the many disciplines that study popular culture. The journal serves the MPCA/ACA membership, as well as scholars globally who recognize and support its mission based on expanding the way we view popular culture as a fundamental component within the contemporary world.

Aims and scope

Popular culture is at the heart of democratic citizenship. It serves as an engine driving technology, innovation, and information, as well as a methodological lens employed by the many fields that examine culture, often from an interdisciplinary perspective. Managed by The Midwest Popular Culture Association / American Culture Association (MPCA/ACA), The Popular Culture Studies Journal is an academic, refereed journal for scholars, academics, and students from the many disciplines that study America and American culture. The journal serves its membership and scholars globally who recognize and support its mission based on expanding the way we view popular culture as a fundamental component within the contemporary world.

Topics covered:

– Film

– Music

– Television

– Sports

– Celebrity Culture

– Technology

– Literature

– Comics/Cartoons/Graphic Novels

However, many scholars approach these topics from an interdisciplinary perspective, which adds significant value over single-issue or more focused/specialized journals.

All contributions to The Popular Culture Studies Journal will be forwarded to members of the Editorial Board or other reviewers for comment. Manuscripts must not be previously published, nor should they be submitted for publication elsewhere while being reviewed by The Popular Culture Studies Journal’s Editorial Board.

Please see http://mpcaaca.org/the-popular-culture-studies-journal/ for more details.

We are also planning special issues centered on topics such as Women of Color and Asian/Americans in popular culture. Bookmark http://mpcaaca.org/the-popular-culture-studies-journal/ for updates!

Call for Papers: Edited Collection on Race in Fandom

April 3, 2017

CALL FOR PAPERS: EDITED COLLECTION ON RACE IN FANDOM

Fan studies has consistently identified media or participatory fandom as an intertextual and selfreflexive communitarian space. Further, scholars have produced extremely important work concerning fan identity in these spaces, theorized mainly around the axes of gender and sexuality (Hellekson and Busse 2006; Stein 2015). However, a sustained examination of the effect of racial identity in these spaces has not yet occurred.

This edited collection takes its impulse from Rebecca Wanzo’s (2015) crucial intervention into the genealogy of fan studies that maintained that this glaring omission is not an oversight. Rather, race continues to be absent from broad-based theorizations about fan culture because it “troubles” foundational assumptions about its subversive and inclusive ethos. This collection therefore aims to investigate the ramifications of such trouble by highlighting the operations of race/racism within fandom spaces. It asks how our current conceptions of shared pleasure and intertextual communities interface with these dynamics. The collection aims to tackle these questions from a diverse array of theoretical standpoints and fan texts, also considering the complexity of the category of racial/cultural/ethnic/religious identity itself within a globalized fan-scape.

The collection will be published by a university press (proposal under negotiation) with the publication date of early 2018. Abstracts are solicited for essays of about 6000-7000 words from scholars working on any area of participatory/media fandom, with a broad approach to that term encouraged to include under-studied aspects of fan participation. Please send in 300 word abstracts and author bios to Rukmini Pande (rukmini.pande@gmail.com) by 30th May 2017.

Suggested topics include but are not limited to:
 Theoretical approaches to the category of race/racism in fandom.
 The differential operations of race/racism in transnational/transcultural fandoms.
 Approaches to racializing gender and sexuality in fanwork. Studies of non-white fanboys are especially encouraged.
 The operations of race/racism in offline spaces such fan conventions.
 The operations of race/racism in material fan practices such as cosplay, cult fan collectors, etc.
 The operations of race/racism in non-traditional participatory fandoms such as sports, music, theatre, video gaming, offline gaming, RPG’s etc.
 The issue of race/racism as both a disturbance to fan spaces and as an impulse to radical transformative work within them.
 Historical approaches to race/racism in fandom in order to expand the “canon” of participatory fandom.
 Pedagogical approaches to teaching race/racism in the fandom studies classroom.

Rukmini Pande has recently completed her PhD from the University of Western Australia. Her dissertation “Squee From The Margins: The Operations of Racial/Cultural/Ethnic Identity in Media Fandom” is currently under contract with the University of Iowa Press. She has also published on the topic of race/racism in fandom in numerous edited collection such as Seeing Fans (eds Paul Booth and Lucy Bennett) and the forthcoming Wiley Companion to Fan Studies (ed Paul Booth). She is also published in journals like Transformative Works and Cultures and The Journal of Feminist Studies.

UPDATED CFP: Sex, Subversion and Bodily Boundaries: The Darker Side of Slash Fan Fiction

February 15, 2017

 

UPDATED CFP: Sex, Subversion and Bodily Boundaries: The Darker Side of Slash Fan Fiction

 

Proposals are invited for essays exploring the depiction of (and engagement with) “non-normative” eroticism within online slash and femslash fan fiction.

 

Following the publication of Hellekson and Busse’s groundbreaking edited collection Fan Fiction and Fan Communities in the Age of the Internet (2006), academic interest in slash fiction has continued to document the evolution and development of the genre as a whole. It is generally proposed that slash fiction enjoys a simultaneous intertextual function – partly a subversive cultural dialogue and partly an unapologetically playful approach to literary convention – but a function which is ultimately more complex and nuanced than a traditional incorporation/resistance paradigm would suggest. 


This collection aims to engage directly and explicitly with some of slash fiction’s less gentle aspects in order to explore the following question: in a text which not only deliberately creates but
 maintains unstable, unequal and ungentle paradigms, can the same critical frameworks that depict slash fiction as a valorised form of egalitarian romance still be applied? If a text refuses to moving towards the gradual equality and intimacy inherent within Romantic convention, can the ending only be an unhappy one?
This collection of essays aims to supplement existing fan academia with a small insight into what is an underrepresented but no less prolific or popular facet of slash fiction. With this is mind, proposals are invited for essays of c.8500 words exploring the following in erotic slash fiction:

·         The exploration, portrayal and reception of BDSM encounters and relationships.

·         The portrayal of cisgender characters which challenge heteronormative patterns of behaviour, either by non-compliance or by excessive performativity. Particular interest in the dynamics generated by two ‘butch’ or ‘girly’ characters in sexual scenes and how violence is used to regulate and code ‘unacceptable’ behaviours and desires.

·         Xenofetishism and the treatment of alternative bodily configurations such as external breeding, hermaphroditic characters in slash fiction.

·         Fame and infamy within fan writing; the perks and perils of having a reputation for pushing the boundaries.

·         The treatment of trans* characters, non-binary gender, genderqueer and genderfluid characters in overtly sexual situations – both in canon and in fan texts.

·         The portrayal of abusive behaviours, rape scenes and toxic relationships and the appeal of the themes.

·         The treatment of and audience response to taboo relationships – incest, guardian/ward, underage characters and exploited characters.

·         Discussions and debates within fan communities regarding explicitly non-normative sexuality within slash fiction as a whole, particularly in regard to participation in kinkmemes, Shipping Olympics, Kink Bingo, fic requests -+etc.

·         Non-monogamy and non-monogamous characters and relationships, non-normative femininity/masculinity and any explorations thereof.

These lists are far from complete and should be taken only as a starting point, rather than definitive. 

 

Generally speaking, texts under discussion should have been produced, published and released within the last twenty years, although if a text beyond this timeframe is particularly significant this can be discussed – please do get in touch with your ideas. Source media includes but is not limited to: role-playing video games, webcomics, TV episodes and series, comics and graphic novels, novels and short stories, and films. Proposals are also welcome for essays exploring the unique deictic nature of slash fan fiction as an ongoing dialogue between canon, text and audience. Particular interest will be given to papers exploring how digital accessibility has contributed to its popularity as a genre, and the cultural impacts generated by the popularity of made-to-order fan fiction commissions, such as kinkmemes, Shipping Olympics, Kink Bingo, fic requests etc.

 

Final inclusion in the published volume will be subject to peer review.

 

Please send proposals of approximately 500 words plus a short biography to ashtonspacey@gmail.com by Wednesday 22nd February 2017.