Posts Tagged ‘Publication’

Hunting the Dark Knight: Twenty-first Century Batman

April 24, 2012

(Information from the I.B. Tauris website)

Publishing alongside the world premiere of Christopher Nolan’s third Batman film The Dark Knight Rises, Will Brooker’s new book explores Batman’s twenty-first century incarnations. Brooker’s close analysis of Batman Begins and The Dark Knight offers a rigorous, accessible account of the complex relationship between popular films, audiences, and producers in our age of media convergence. By exploring themes of authorship, adaptation and intertextuality, he addresses a myriad of questions raised by these films: did Batman Begins end when The Dark Knight began? Does its story include the Gotham Knight DVD, or the ‘Why So Serious’ viral marketing campaign? Is it separate from the parallel narratives of the Arkham Asylum videogame, the monthly comic books, the animated series and the graphic novels? Can the brightly campy incarnations of the Batman ever be fully repressed by The Dark Knight, or are they an intrinsic part of the character? Do all of these various manifestations feed into a single Batman metanarrative? This will be a vital text for film students and academics, as well as legions of Batman fans.

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New issue of Transformative Works and Cultures

March 15, 2012

The new issue of TWC, Fan/Remix Video, is now available to view online. You can find it here: http://journal.transformativeworks.org/index.php/twc/issue/current

Love and Monsters: The “Doctor Who” Experience, 1979 to the Present

March 13, 2012

Scholar and Who fan Miles Booy has written the first historical account of the public interpretation of Doctor Who. Love and Monsters begins in 1979 with the publication of ‘Doctor Who Weekly’, the magazine that would start a chain of events that would see creative fans taking control of the merchandise and even of the programme’s massively successful twenty-first century reboot. From the twilight of Tom Baker’s years to the newest Doctor, Matt Smith, Miles Booy explores the shifting meaning of Doctor Who across the years – from the Third Doctor’s suggestion that we should read the Bible, via costumed fans on television, up to the 2010 general election in Britain. This is also the story of how the ambitious producer John Nathan-Turner, assigned to the programme in 1979, produced a visually-excessive programme for a tele-literate fanbase, and how this style changed the ways in which Doctor Who could be read. The Doctor’s world has never been bigger, inside or out!


For more information click here.

Morrissey: Fandom, Representations and Identities – now in paperback

March 13, 2012

Price £15.95/USD20 Paperback

ISBN 978-1-84150-596-1

Published: March 19th  2012
Imprint: Intellect Books

Edited by Eoin Devereux and Aileen Dillane and Martin J. Power

Morrissey is one of the most influential songwriters of our time. As leader of The Smiths and as a solo-artiste, he has remained an anti-establishment and outspoken figure who has fought to bring controversial social issues to the forefront of our minds. Morrissey has used his music and his fame as vehicles for social change, singing and speaking out on a variety of issues: including class discrimination, ethnicity, alternative sexualities, vegetarianism and animal rights, delivering his message in velvet sound-bytes and typically provocative performances.

Morrissey: Fandom, Representations and Identities focuses exclusively on Morrissey’s solo career and provides a diverse collection of 18 essays that highlight his creative contribution to music and culture.  Working across a range of academic disciplines and approaches, these essays seek to make sense of the many complexities and controversies surrounding this iconic performer. Together, these essays examine the often intense fan cultures associated with Morrissey and how his creative work represents and performs many facets of the social world in which we find ourselves. Contributors to this book range from established academics to exciting emerging scholars in a range of fields and geographical locations, each of whom bring different perspectives on Morrissey and his work as an artist, a champion of the proletariat, and an elusive and contradictory stage personae.